Ivan Eland

America’s Counter-Productive Pakistan Policy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_30_eland.mp3]

Ivan Eland, author of The Empire Has No Clothes, Antiwar.com columnist and Director of the Center on Peace and Liberty at the Independent Institute explains America’s policy toward Pakistan and how it has that country on the path to be taken over by religious types, the lack of a hunt for bin Laden and Zawahiri, the failures and fraud of American empire, why Ron Paul is right about the roots of anti-American terrorism, and hopes for a realignment among the Old Right and New Left in opposition to our country’s state of perpetual war.

MP3 here.

Ivan Eland is Senior Fellow and Director of the Center on Peace & Liberty at The Independent Institute in Oakland, Calif. Having received his Ph.D. in national security policy from George Washington University, Dr. Eland has served as Principal Defense Analyst at the Congressional Budget Office, Evaluator-in-Charge for the U.S. General Accounting Office (national security and intelligence), and Investigator for the House Foreign Affairs Committee. He has testified on NATO expansion before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and CIA oversight before the House Government Reform Committee.

Dr. Eland is the author of Putting “Defense” Back into U.S. Defense Policy: Rethinking U.S. Security in the Post-Cold War World and forty-five studies on national security issues. His articles have appeared in Arms Control Today, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Emory Law Journal, The Independent Review, Issues in Science and Technology, Mediterranean Quarterly, Middle East and International Review, Middle East Policy, Nexus, and Northwestern Journal of International Affairs. His popular writings have been published in the Los Angeles Times, USA Today, Houston Chronicle, Dallas Morning News, San Diego Union-Tribune, Washington Post, Miami Herald, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Newsday, Sacramento Bee, Orange County Register, and Chicago Sun-Times. He has appeared on ABC’s “World News Tonight,” CNN’s “Crossfire,” Fox News, CNBC, CNN-fn, MSNBC, NPR, PBS, CBC, BBC, and other national and international TV and radio programs.

His column appears Tuesdays on Antiwar.com.

Charles Pena

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_29_pena.mp3]

Independent Institute senior fellow and Antiwar.com columnist Charles Peña discusses the most-likely false terrorist threat in the case of the Ft. Dix six, and how America ought to handle the real terrorist threat.

MP3 here. (40:58)

Charles V. Peña is a senior fellow at the Independent Institute, a senior fellow with the Coalition for a Realistic Foreign Policy, a senior fellow with the George Washington University Homeland Security Policy Institute, an adviser to the Straus Military Reform Project, and an analyst for MSNBC television. He has also appeared on CNN, Fox News, NBC Nightly News, ABC World News Tonight, CBS Evening News, and The McLaughlin Group, as well as international television and radio. Peña is the co-author of Exiting Iraq: Why the U.S. Must End the Military Occupation and Renew the War Against al-Qaeda, and author of Winning the Un-War: A New Strategy for the War on Terrorism.

His articles have been published by Reason; The American Conservative; The National Interest; Mediterranean Quarterly; Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics, & Public Policy; Journal of Law & Social Change (University of San Francisco); Nexus (Chapman University); and Issues in Science & Technology (National Academy of Sciences).

His exclusive column appears every other Wednesday on Antiwar.com.

Dahr Jamail

Iraqis Are People, It is Wrong to Kill Them

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_28_jamail.mp3]

Dahr Jamail explains the Earthly Hell that the U.S. government has created for the people of Iraq.

MP3 here. (40:30)

In late 2003, Weary of the overall failure of the US media to accurately report on the realities of the war in Iraq for the Iraqi people and US soldiers, Dahr Jamail went to Iraq to report on the war himself.

His dispatches were quickly recognized as an important media resource. He is now writing for the Inter Press Service, The Asia Times and many other outlets. His reports have also been published with The Nation, The Sunday Herald, Islam Online, the Guardian, Foreign Policy in Focus, and the Independent to name just a few. Dahr’s dispatches and hard news stories have been translated into French, Polish, German, Dutch, Spanish, Japanese, Portuguese, Chinese, Arabic and Turkish. On radio as well as television, Dahr reports for Democracy Now!, the BBC, and numerous other stations around the globe. Dahr is also special correspondent for Flashpoints.

Dahr has spent a total of 8 months in occupied Iraq as one of only a few independent US journalists in the country. In the MidEast, Dahr has also has reported from Syria, Lebanon and Jordan. Dahr uses the DahrJamailIraq.com website and his popular mailing list to disseminate his dispatches.

Anthony Romero

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/aw052507anthonyromero.mp3]

Executive Director of the ACLU In Defense of Our America: The Fight for Civil Liberties in the Age of Terror discusses Congress’ destruction of the “Great Writ,” habeas corpus with the Military Commissions Act, which he identifies as the single greatest threat to America’s heritage of liberty and limited government power, widespread electronic spying on American citizens, how even John Ashcroft opposed the program.

MP3 here.

Anthony D. Romero is the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, the nation’s premier defender of liberty and individual freedom. He took the helm of the 87-year-old organization just four days before the September 11, 2001 attacks. Shortly after, the ACLU launched its national Safe and Free campaign to protect basic freedoms during a time of crisis. Under Romero’s leadership, the ACLU gained court victories on the Patriot Act and filed landmark litigation on the torture and abuse of detainees in U.S. custody. Most recently, the ACLU successfully challenged the Bush administration’s illegal spying program.

Romero, an attorney with a history of public-interest activism, has presided over the most successful membership growth in the ACLU’s history and more than doubled the budget and national staff of the organization since he began his tenure. This unprecedented growth has allowed the ACLU to expand its litigation, lobbying and public education efforts, including new initiatives focused on racial justice, religious freedom, privacy, reproductive freedom and lesbian and gay rights.

Romero is the ACLU’s sixth executive director, and the first Latino and openly gay man to serve in that capacity. In 2005, Romero was named one of Time Magazine’s 25 Most Influential Hispanics in America, and has received dozens of public service awards and an honorary doctorate from the City University of New York School of Law.

Born in New York City to parents who hailed from Puerto Rico, Romero was the first in his family to graduate from high school. He is a graduate of Stanford University Law School and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy and International Affairs. He is a member of the New York Bar Association and has sat on numerous nonprofit boards.

Steve Clemons

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awsteveclemons052107.mp3]

Steve Clemons of The Washington Note blog and the New America Foundation discusses his contribution to the final destruction of the career of Paul Wolfowitz.

MP3 here. (9:38)

Steven Clemons directs the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, which aims to promote a new American internationalism that combines a tough-minded realism about America’s interests in the world with a pragmatic idealism about the kind of world order best suited to America’s democratic way of life. He is also a Senior Fellow at New America, and previously served as Executive Vice President.

Publisher of the popular political blog The Washington Note, Mr. Clemons is a long-term policy practitioner and entrepreneur in Washington, D.C. He has served as Executive Vice President of the Economic Strategy Institute, Senior Policy Advisor on Economic and International Affairs to Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) and was the first Executive Director of the Nixon Center.

Prior to moving to Washington, Mr. Clemons served for seven years as Executive Director of the Japan America Society of Southern California, and co-founded with Chalmers Johnson the Japan Policy Research Institute, of which he is still Director. He is a Member of the Board of the Clarke Center at Dickinson College, a liberal arts college in Carlisle, Pa., as well as an Advisory Board Member of the C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College in Chestertown, Md. He is also a Board Member of the Global Policy Innovations Program at the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs and a member of the board of the Citizens for Global Solutions Education Fund.

Mr. Clemons writes frequently on matters of foreign policy, defense, and international economic policy. His work has appeared in many of the major leading op-ed pages, journal, and magazines around the world.

Roger Morris

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awrogermorris052507.mp3]

Former NSC staffer Roger Morris discusses the pathetic American media, U.S. covert action in Iran, the sad state of 9/10 of the Republican candidates, and 7/8 of the Democrats, the growth of terrorism, why the 9/11 hijackers did it, the ignorance of the U.S. population, and the overthrow of Mossedeq.

MP3 here. (15:07)

Roger Morris, who served in the State Department and on the Senior Staff of the National Security Council under Presidents Johnson and Nixon, resigned in protest at the invasion of Cambodia. He then worked as a legislative advisor in the U.S. Senate and a director of policy studies at the Carnegie Endowment, and writes this Rumsfeldian history from intimate firsthand knowledge as well as extensive research. A Visiting Honors professor at the University of Washington and Research Fellow of the Green Institute, where his work originally appears. He is an award-winning historian and investigative journalist, including a National Book Award Silver Medal winner, and the author of books on Nixon, Kissinger, Haig, and the Clintons. More recently, he co-authored with Sally Denton The Money and the Power, a history of Las Vegas as the paradigm of national corruption. His latest work, Shadows of the Eagle, a history of U.S. covert interventions and policy in the Middle East and South Asia over the past half-century, will be published in 2007 by Knopf.

Scott Ritter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awscottritter052507.mp3]

Scott Ritter, author of Target Iran and Waging Peace: The Art of War for the Antiwar Movement, discusses the irrationality of Bush’s Iraq policy, the Democrats betrayal of the Antiwar Left, Mitt Romney’s fit over ABC News’ reporting Cheney’s leak of the finding authorizing CIA action against Iran, the pretext of Iran’s nuclear program as the excuse to bomb them, Pelosi and Reid’s complicity in that upcoming war and John Boehner’s blubbering crocodile tears.

MP3 here. (19:18)

As a chief weapons inspector for the United Nations Special Commission in Iraq, Scott Ritter was labeled a hero by some, a maverick by others, and a spy by the Iraqi government. In charge of searching out weapons of mass destruction within Iraq, Ritter was on the front lines of the ongoing battle against arms proliferation. His experience in Iraq served as the basis for his book Endgame, which explored the shortcomings of American foreign policy in the Persian Gulf region and alternative approaches to handling the Iraqi crisis, and for Iraq Confidential, which detailed his seven year experience as a weapons inspector.

Scott Ritter has had an extensive and distinguished career in government service. He is an intelligence specialist with a 12-year career in the U.S. Marine Corps including assignments in the former Soviet Union and the Middle East. Rising to the rank of Major, Ritter spent several months of the Gulf War serving under General Norman Schwarzkopf with US Central Command headquarters in Saudi Arabia, where he played an instrumental role in formulating and implementing combat operations targeting Iraqi mobile missile launchers which threatened Israel.

In 1991, Ritter joined the United Nations weapons inspections team, or UNSCOM. He participated in 34 inspection missions, 14 of them as chief inspector. Ritter resigned from UNSCOM in August 1998, citing US interference in the work of the inspections.

He is the author of many books, including “Iraq Confidential: The Untold Story of the Intelligence Conspiracy to Undermine the UN and Overthrow Saddam Hussein” and most recently “Target Iran: The Truth About the White House’s Plans for Regime Change.” He lives in New York State. Ritter was born in Florida, and raised all over the world in a career military family. He is a graduate of Franklin and Marshall College, with a B.A. in Soviet History.

Gareth Porter

Bush Refuses to Allow Iraqi Civil War to End

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_25_porter.mp3]

Historian and journalist Gareth Porter discusses Moqtada al Sadr’s outreach to the Sunnis and the Bush administrations insistence in backing the Iran factions instead and Dick Cheney’s determination to have a war with Iran whether Bush wants one or not.

MP3 here.

Gareth Porter is a historian. His latest book is Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam (University of California Press).

Chalmers Johnson

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awchalmersjohnson051707.mp3]

Chalmers Johnson, author of Blowback, Sorrows of Empire and Nemesis: The Last Days of the American Republic, explains that Dr. Ron Paul is right about blowback: the unintended consequences of policies that were kept secret from the American people so they – including Rudy Giuliani – are taken by surprise.

He also lays out a plan to repeal the empire and return our nation to a limited constitutional republic.

MP3 here. (19:48)

Chalmers Johnson is president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, a non-profit research and public affairs organization devoted to public education concerning Japan and international relations in the Pacific. He taught for thirty years, 1962-1992, at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California and held endowed chairs in Asian politics at both of them. At Berkeley he served as chairman of the Center for Chinese Studies and as chairman of the Department of Political Science. His B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics and political science are all from the University of California, Berkeley. He first visited Japan in 1953 as a U.S. Navy officer and has lived and worked there with his wife, the anthropologist Sheila K. Johnson, every year between 1961 and 1998.

Johnson has been honored with fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Guggenheim Foundation; and in 1976 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has written numerous articles and reviews and some sixteen books, including Peasant Nationalism and Communist Power on the Chinese revolution, An Instance of Treason on Japan’s most famous spy, Revolutionary Change on the theory of violent protest movements, and MITI and the Japanese Miracle on Japanese economic development. This last-named book laid the foundation for the “revisionist” school of writers on Japan, and because of it the Japanese press dubbed him the “Godfather of revisionism.”

He was chairman of the academic advisory committee for the PBS television series “The Pacific Century,” and he played a prominent role in the PBS “Frontline” documentary “Losing the War with Japan.” Both won Emmy awards. His most recent books are Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2000) and The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic, which was published by Metropolitan in January 2004. Blowback won the 2001 American Book Award of the Before Columbus Foundation.

Ray McGovern

3rd CIA Officer Confirms Ron Paul On Roots of Terrorism

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_25_mcgovern.mp3]

For the third time this week, a retired CIA officer has told Antiwar Radio that U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East is the driving force in al Qaeda’s recruitment and motivation for attacking America on September 11th.

Ray McGovern, a 27 year veteran of the Central Intelligence Agency, when asked Friday afternoon what he thought of the exchange between Congressman Ron Paul and Rudy Giuliani said (at 23:45 out of 43:23)

MP3 here.

“I’m really edified by Ron Paul stepping up and stating what he believes to be the case.

“If you believe that they hate us for our democracy or for our freedoms, well I’ve got a bridge in Brooklyn that I’d really like to sell you at a cut rate.

“They hate us for our policies and that’s what Ron Paul was saying. …

“Giuliani … really showed his true colors there as a demagogue.”

Earlier this week Michael Scheuer, the former chief of the CIA’s bin Laden unit and Philip Giraldi, another former CIA counter-terrorism officer, made much the same statements to Antiwar Radio.

McGovern then made the common analogy of terrorists and mosquitos and why the policy should be to “drain the swamp.” But rather than advising more invasions in the name of swamp draining as the Bush administration has maintained is their policy, McGovern says you want to remove the circumstances which create terrorism, by “find[ing] out where these terrorists are breeding.”

“[There is a] swamp of grievances dating back decades: Three generations of people living in the equivalent of concentration camps in the West Bank and Gaza, dictatorial regimes in Saudi Arabia, Egypt and other places.

“If you look at those grievances and instead of trying to shoot those terrorists as they leave that swamp, you drain that swamp by addressing those grievances and giving these people some reason to hope for a better future. …

“People will come back and say, ‘Now Ray, for God’s sake, Osama bin Laden doesn’t give a darn about the Palestinians.’ Well, that doesn’t matter whether he does or he doesn’t. He knows the kind of resonance that kind of appeal has.”

McGovern then quoted the 9/11 Commission Report regarding the motivation of Kahlid Sheik Mohammad, the ringleader of the September 11th attacks:

“Kahlid Sheik Mohammad was motivated not by any antipathy resulting from his stay in the United States [where he had attended college years before], but by his profound hatred for U.S. policy toward Israel – favoring Israel one-sidedly.”

McGovern then summarized a footnote in the back of the 9/11 Commission Report as saying:

“These are practically the exact words of what Ramzi Yousef – Kahlid Sheik Mohammad’s nephew – used in bragging about his pride in being condemned to 140 years in a federal penitentiary for trying to knock down one of the Twin Towers back in 1993.”

That is indeed what Yousef said.

Also discussed: How the 9/11 Commission whitewashed the role of U.S. Israel policy in their report, How the Dick Cheney-neoconservative cabal lied us into war in Iraq and Tenet’s failure to stop them, the history of the “crazies in the basement,” Bush Jr.’s relationship with Cheney in light of Steve Clemons’ scoop about Dick Cheney’s efforts to force a war with Iran in an end run around the President, Brent Scowcroft’s statement that Ariel Sharon had Bush wrapped around his little finger and why he made it, Cheney’s twisted motivations for the exercise of his power, the interest which put Cheney firmly in the camp of the Israel Lobby over most of the rest of the establishment and why he hasn’t completely given up on the Democrats.

Hasan Askari Rizvi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awHasanAskariRizvi052307.mp3]

Hasan Askari Rizvi, Visiting Pakistan Sudies Professor at Johns Hopkins University, discusses the various purposes to which American aid to Pakistan is spent, various social and political elements there, the recent riots over Musharraf’s removal of the Chief Justice of their supreme court and how much danger the dictator is in.

MP3 here. (15:05)

Prof. Rizvi is one of the leading political science scholars in Pakistan, with over 30 years of teaching and research experience at the post-graduate level. He served on the Faculty of Political Science at Punjab University from 1971 to 2001. From 1995 to 1999, he was the Quaid-i-Azam Distinguished Professor of Pakistan Studies at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, where he taught classes on South Asia. In 2002, he was also a Visiting Research Scholar at the Cooperative Monitoring Centre at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, where he co-authored a paper on “Nuclear Terrorism and South Asia.” He has published numerous books and articles on Pakistan’s politics, society and foreign policy, as well as over 500 newspaper articles in both English-language and Urdu-language publications.

Philip Giraldi

Rudy Giuliani “not serious” about terrorism

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_23_giraldi.mp3]

A former CIA officer said Wednesday that former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani is “not serious” about terrorism and “ignorant” about the Middle East.

Former CIA counter-terrorism officer Philip Giraldi, in an interview with Antiwar Radio on Wednesday, said Giuliani “indicated that he was not only not serious about [al Qaeda terrorism], but seem[s] to be ignorant of both the 9/11 [Commission] report and political realities in the Middle East.”

MP3 here. (50:14)

This answer came in response to a question about the controversy caused by Congressman Ron Paul at the second Republican Presidential debate.

Dr. Paul said that the the attacks on the United States on September 11th were “blowback” from the American government’s interventionist foreign policy. Giuliani, insisting that they hate us for our “freedom,” demanded Paul retract his statement – which Paul refused to do.

When asked for a comment about the controversy, Giraldi said,

“I think anybody who knows anything about what’s been going on for the last 10 years would realize that cause and effect are operating here – that, essentially, al Qaeda has an agenda which very specifically says what its grievances are. And its grievances are basically that ‘we’re over there.’

“So all Ron Paul was basically saying was that – even as the 9/11 commission report indicated – there were consequences for our presence in the Middle East and if we seriously want to address the terrorism problem we have to be serious about that issue.

“Giuliani indicated that he was not only not serious about that issue, but seemed to be ignorant of both the 9/11 [Commission] report and political realities in the Middle East.”

(Giraldi also disdained both Giuliani and Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney’s embrace of torture and the Guantanamo prison and explained how it only helps al Qaeda, particularly in their propaganda efforts.)

When asked how Osama bin Laden is able to attract followers in the Islamic World, Giraldi explained,

“Well, he taps into reservoirs of resentment in the Muslim world, there’s no question about it. He’s a charismatic leader and he has been successful. He was a key figure in driving the Russians out of Afghanistan. He has certainly bloodied the nose of the United States more than once, so he has a certain appeal. This is not to say that he’s a good man or that he’s a man we would want to copy in any way, but the fact is that the slights and resentments many Muslims see in their relationship with the West are a resource for Osama bin Laden, and that we have reinforced that with things that he can exploit – like invading Iraq.

“As has been made very clear, Osama bin Laden had no connection with Saddam Hussein and to the contrary, they were kind of sworn enemies, and when the United States went into Iraq, Osama bin Laden saw this as an opportunity and he immediately created an al Qaeda organization inside Iraq. There had been no al Qaeda organization inside Iraq prior to that and this was a huge opportunity for him. And as the war has gotten worse and we’ve had incidents like Abu Ghraib, we’ve had repeated civilian casualties – that Lancet report from the British that says as many as 650,000 Iraqis have been killed as a result of the war – things like that just add fuel to the fire. And basically the main beneficiary of all this is not the United States. It may not even be Israel. It’s probably al Qaeda and Osama bin Laden.”

When asked specifically what had caused Osama bin Laden, who fought in the U.S.-backed jihad against the Russians in the 1980s, to become an enemy of the United States, Giraldi replied,

“In the wake of the Afghan war, the United States – actually during the first Gulf War – established a major military presence in Saudi Arabia itself. And that was, I believe, the trigger for Osama to become a front-line opponent of the United States. He has repeatedly said in his writings and speeches that the United States’ presence in the ‘holy lands’ of Saudi Arabia were a major element in his political philosophy.”

Giraldi also commented on the Bush administration refrain – literally pitched again by the President as the interview was being recorded – that “if we don’t fight them over there, we’ll have to fight them here,” saying that such an assertion is “totally ridiculous.”

“The premise that if we’re not fighting them over there, we’ll be fighting them over here is totally ridiculous. We’re fighting them over there because we’re over there, and because we’re over there, we have a problem here. And if you eliminate that nexus, if you take us out of our being in their faces, then the reality is that they are not going to be over here because they basically don’t have that agenda.”

When pressed on the question of whether bin Laden would want to send al Qaeda guys to “follow us home” from the Middle East should we withdraw, if only to try to keep us there for al Qaeda’s benefit (such as providing them with increased numbers of recruits and targets for them to train on), Giraldi replied,

“I don’t see that. I think he has a constituency and he has an agenda and he’s very focused on both. His agenda is not to pursue the United States to the United States after we leave the Middle East. … If we were to basically get out of Iraq and get out of the region – in the intrusive way that we’re there right now – that would take a lot of the fuel out of Osama bin Laden’s fire. I don’t see that there’s any agenda to follow us to the United States to destroy our way of life or whatever the explanation would be.”

When asked about the administration’s assertions that al Qaeda will take over Iraq’s al Anbar province if the U.S. military leaves, Giraldi said,

“No. I think the reality is that if the United States leaves it will be a very bad thing for al Qaeda because the Sunnis don’t particularly want them around and would get rid of them.”

He then said that the only reason al Qaeda is tolerated by Iraqi Sunnis is to help fight the American occupation and that,

“There have already been reports that the Sunnis are already kind of tired of them because when they stage a major provocation or attack, it’s the local Sunni population that has to take the grief when the U.S. Army descends. … It’s a marriage of convenience with al Qaeda insofar as it’s a marriage at all. So I think it would be fallacious to assume – In fact, let me [say it] stronger than that: I think it would be ridiculous to assume that al Qaeda could establish some kind of serious presence in Iraq similar to what it did in Afghanistan because the dynamic is completely different.”

When asked how dangerous of a threat to the U.S. al Qaeda really represents, Giraldi said they remain a serious problem and explained the lack of terrorist attacks in the U.S. since September 11th as the result, not of the valiant efforts of the FBI, but of the moderate temper of American Muslims. Regarding the list of terrorism prosecution in the United States since September 11th, Giraldi says,

“[E]very arrest of so-called “radical Islamists” in the United States have been kind of jokes in that, in many cases, these people are not capable of carrying out any acts. In a number of cases, like the most recent one in New Jersey, there was an FBI informant in the middle of the group, and it seems to me, from what I’ve read about it, that the FBI informant may well have been the motivator for these people planning what they were planning.”

Comparing America to Britain, Giraldi said he suspects the main reason there haven’t been more attacks here since 9/11 is that,

“We don’t have that fifth column in the United States of people who are really actively out to betray their country. …

“American Muslims just are not wired that way, and I don’t think that many American Muslims would support the kind of radical action that you see in Great Britain, for example among its own Muslim community – or in France. I think this is a question of – this is a different kind of country, with a different kind of Muslim immigrant that came here. And the expectation and the way these people do things are somewhat different.”

And that’s just the first part of the interview.

Click here to open or download the MP3 and hear all this plus Philip Giraldi on the intelligent way to fight al Qaeda (low-key: cops, intelligence and only rarely military force), the the ongoing covert war against Iran by the CIA and the military, the possibility of overt war – including the use of nuclear weapons, the likely consequences of such folly – including the possible loss of our army in Iraq and destruction of our economy, Admiral Fallon’s reluctance to participate and America and Lebanon’s backing of the Fatah al-Islam terrorist group in Southern Lebanon and how it has already blown back in their face…

“The nuclear option is still on the table in two ways…”

Scott Horton

Revolution Within the Form

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_21_horton.mp3]

International human rights attorney and author of the blog No Comment at Harpers.org, The Other Scott Horton (no relation), discusses the revolution within the form of American government that has occurred in the last six years in the name of the all powerful “Unitary Executive”: Kidnapping, torture, massive domestic wiretapping, the replacement of U.S. attorneys who don’t do a good enough job prosecuting Democrats, and why George Washington’s system was better.

MP3 here. (40:31)

Scott Horton is a contributor to Harper’s magazine and writes the blog No Comment.

A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union. He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Gareth Porter

Historian and journalist Gareth Porter explains why the “permanent government” – the State Department, the CIA and the military – have decided that there is not going to be a bombing of Iran. The latest is that the new head of Centcom, Admiral Fallon, has refused to allow a third carrier battle group to overlap the two already there as Dick Cheney wanted. Also where Iran fits in the neocon plan for world domination, bogus accusations against them in terms of their nuclear program and “EFPs” in Iraq, covert support for terrorists in Iran, and the time they offered everything including recognition of Israel.

MP3 here.

Gareth Porter is a historian and journalist for IPS News . His latest book is Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam (University of California Press).

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_17_porter.mp3]

Chalmers Johnson

Chalmers Johnson, author of Nemesis: The Last Days of the American Republic discusses America’s descent down the path of militarism, secrecy, empire, authoritarianism and destruction, the role of the military industrial complex and the mass media and hope for a mass movement to restore the constitution.

MP3 here. (37:19)

Chalmers Johnson is president of the Japan Policy Research Institute, a non-profit research and public affairs organization devoted to public education concerning Japan and international relations in the Pacific. He taught for thirty years, 1962-1992, at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California and held endowed chairs in Asian politics at both of them. At Berkeley he served as chairman of the Center for Chinese Studies and as chairman of the Department of Political Science. His B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in economics and political science are all from the University of California, Berkeley. He first visited Japan in 1953 as a U.S. Navy officer and has lived and worked there with his wife, the anthropologist Sheila K. Johnson, every year between 1961 and 1998.

Johnson has been honored with fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Guggenheim Foundation; and in 1976 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has written numerous articles and reviews and some sixteen books, including Peasant Nationalism and Communist Power on the Chinese revolution, An Instance of Treason on Japan’s most famous spy, Revolutionary Change on the theory of violent protest movements, and MITI and the Japanese Miracle on Japanese economic development. This last-named book laid the foundation for the “revisionist” school of writers on Japan, and because of it the Japanese press dubbed him the “Godfather of revisionism.”

He was chairman of the academic advisory committee for the PBS television series “The Pacific Century,” and he played a prominent role in the PBS “Frontline” documentary “Losing the War with Japan.” Both won Emmy awards. His most recent books are Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2000) and The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic, which was published by Metropolitan in January 2004. Blowback won the 2001 American Book Award of the Before Columbus Foundation.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_17_chjohnson.mp3]

Michael Scheuer

Ron Paul “Exactly Correct”

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_18_scheuer.mp3]

Michael Scheuer, the former head analyst at the CIA’s bin Laden unit, has weighed in on the controversy surrounding the Republican Presidential debate held Tuesday May 15, when Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) stated that American foreign policy was a “contributing factor” in the 9/11 attacks.

“They attack us because we’ve been over there; we’ve been bombing Iraq for 10 years.” Paul said. He was then denounced by former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani who said it was “absurd” and that he’d “never” heard such a thing before demanding a retraction.

In an interview with Antiwar.com’s Antiwar Radio on May 18, Scheuer, who was the head analyst at the CIA’s bin Laden unit, Alec Station and authored the books Through Our Enemies Eyes and Imperial Hubris, said “I thought Mr. Paul captured it the other night exactly correctly. This war is dangerous to America because it’s based, not on gender equality, as Mr. Giuliani suggested, or any other kind of freedom, but simply because of what we do in the Islamic World – because ‘we’re over there,’ basically, as Mr. Paul said in the debate.”

Scheuer also agreed with Dr. Paul’s statement in the debate that the war in Iraq was a diversion from capturing or killing Osama bin Laden and that bin Laden was “delighted” that the U.S. is occupying Iraq as it has become a training ground and recruiting tool for new jihadists joining the movement.

MP3 here.

Michael Scheuer is a 22-year veteran of the CIA and the author ofThrough Our Enemies Eyes: Osama bin Laden, Radical Islam, and the Future of America and Imperial Hubris: Why the West Is Losing the War on Terror.

Patrick Foy

Patrick Foy, author of The Unauthorized World Situation Report, discusses his article for Taki’s Top Drawer, “The Kissinger Connection,” and the foreign policy consensus that led to the invasion of Iraq.

MP3 here.

Patrick Foy is an essayist, short story writer and photographer. He lives in Florida.

[audio:http://www.dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_15_foy.mp3]

Hendrick Smith

Pulitzer Prize and Emmy Award winning reporter and documentary filmmaker Hendrick Smith talks about his PBS special “Spying on the Homefront,” about the National Security Agency and FBI’s spying on the American people – far beyond the so-called “terrorist surveillance program” that the administration claims, the fact that the feds now have almost total access to private firms’ records, why innocent people do have something to worry about, the suitably of the FISA court in handling warrants for national security threats, the unanimity of the people involved in the program that the American people’s liberty is threatened, jerking tappers around for sport and how it’s only getting worse.

MP3 here. (16:55)

Hedrick Smith is Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of several best-selling books. He has created and hosted twelve award-winning PBS prime-time specials and series on topics including Washington’s power game, Soviet perestroika, the global economy, education, and teen violence. For 26 years, Smith served as a correspondent for The New York Times in Washington, Moscow, Cairo, Saigon, Paris and the Pulitzer Prize-winning team that produced the Pentagon Papers series. In 1974, he won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting from Russia and Eastern Europe. Hedrick Smith has published several national best-selling books, including The Russians (1976), The Power Game: How Washington Works (1988), The New Russians (1990) and Rethinking America (1995). Smith’s books and documentaries are frequently used for college and high school courses on government, sociology, and economics.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awhedricksmith051407.mp3]

Justin Raimondo

Antiwar.com’s Justin Raimondo discusses Dr. Ron Paul’s performance in the second GOP presidential debate May 15th, what it reveals about the corruption of the Republican Party and the American people, Homeland Security, the totalitarian impulse of Rudolph Giuliani, and the vile Washington Post’s ulterior motive in trashing the antiwar candidates.

MP3 here.

Justin Raimondo is the editorial director of Antiwar.com. He is the author of An Enemy of the State: The Life of Murray N. Rothbard (Prometheus Books, 2000). He is also the author of Reclaiming the American Right: The Lost Legacy of the Conservative Movement (with an Introduction by Patrick J. Buchanan), (Center for Libertarian Studies, 1993), and Into the Bosnian Quagmire: The Case Against U.S. Intervention in the Balkans (1996).

He is a contributing editor for The American Conservative, a Senior Fellow at the Randolph Bourne Institute, and an Adjunct Scholar with the Ludwig von Mises Institute, and writes frequently for Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_16_raimondo.mp3]

Richard Forno

Security expert Richard Forno discusses the Un-American “Real ID” card, the states’ reactions to it, how citizens of non-compliant states will be marginalized, why more liberty creates better security, and the myth of cyber-terrorism.

MP3 here.

Richard Forno’s career includes helping build the first incident response and computer crimes investigation program for the United States House of Representatives and serving as the first Chief Security Officer at Network Solutions (the InterNIC) where he designed and managed the global information assurance program for one of the Internet’s most critical infrastructures.

Since then, he has consulted with military and commercial clients on assorted critical infrastructure protection and information operations projects. He has advised technology startups and in addition to his current activities as a Principal Consultant for KRvW Associates, is a Visiting Scientist at the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, where he is a course instructor for the CERT Coordination Center.

In 2001, Richard developed (and delivered) American University’s first modern course on information security and conducted regular guest lectures at the National Defense University in Washington, DC from 2001-2003. He is a founding member of the Academic Advisory Board for Northern Virginia Community College’s Information Security Program and also participated in the 2000 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Information Security Education Research Project. In 2006 he co-founded the Senior Information Operations Advisory Council that brings together senior thought leaders from across the IO community to support the evolution of sound IO doctrine, analysis and application.

Richard continues to speak at government, industry, and academic symposia. Along with several articles and columns written over the years, he is the author of The Art of Information Warfare (1999), Incident Response (2001), and the curmudgeonly Weapons of Mass Delusion: America’s Real National Emergency (2003). Additionally, he contributed chapters to the books Cyberwar 2.0: Myths, Mysteries and Realities (1998) and Inventing Arguments (2005).

Both a technologist and student of national security studies, Richard holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in international relations from American University and Salve Regina University, and is a graduate of Valley Forge Military College and the United States Naval War College. Aside from information operations, his current academic and professional research centers on the influence of technology on national security, particularly the issue of security informatics and disclosure.

[audio:http://www.dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_15_forno.mp3]

Steve Vladeck

Associate law professor Steve Vladeck explains the various legal applications and implications of the U.S. government’s war against, and now prosecution of, Jose Padilla.

MP3 here.

Stephen I. Vladeck, Associate Professor of Law, graduated in June 2004 from Yale Law School, where he was awarded the Potter Stewart Prize for Best Team Performance in Moot Court and the Harlan Fiske Stone Prize for Outstanding Moot Court Oralist. He earned a B.A. summa cum laude at Amherst College, where he wrote his senior thesis on “Leipzig’s Shadow: The War Crimes Trials of the First World War and Their Implications from Nuremberg to the Present.”

While a law student, Professor Vladeck served as Executive Editor of The Yale Law Journal and was Student Director of the Balancing Civil Liberties & National Security Post-9/11 Litigation Project. Working with Professor (now Dean) Harold Koh, he participated in litigation challenging the President’s assertion of power after September 11 to detain individuals without trial. Professor Vladeck is also part of the legal team headed by Professor Neal K. Katyal of the Georgetown University Law Center that successfully challenged the Bush Administration’s use of military tribunals at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld.

Vladeck, whose teaching and research interests include civil procedure, federal courts, national security law, constitutional law, and legal history, has clerked for the Honorable Marsha S. Berzon on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and the Honorable Rosemary Barkett on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. A member of the Executive Board of the AALS Section on New Law Professors and a regular contributor to PrawfsBlawg, Vladeck is admitted to practice in the State of New York, Third Department.

[audio:http://www.dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_16_vladeck.mp3]

Patrick Cockburn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awpatrickcockburn051407.mp3]

Patrick Cockburn, intrepid Iraq-based investigative reporter, discusses the daily slaughter in Iraq, the Iraqi parliament’s vote for the U.S. to leave, recent attacks in the Green Zone, the factional differences and the “surge.”

MP3 here.

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent of The Independent, has been visiting Iraq since 1978. He was awarded the 2005 Martha Gellhorn prize for war reporting in recognition of his writing on Iraq. He is the author of, his memoir, The Broken Boy (Jonathan Cape, 2005), and with Andrew Cockburn, Saddam Hussein: An American Obsession (Verso, 2000). His latest book, The Occupation: War, Resistance and Daily Life in Iraq is published by Verso in October 2006.

Will Grigg

Will Grigg, editor of The Right Source and author of the blog Pro-Libertate, discusses the claims of the president’s pet Straussians that it is perfectly constitutional for the President to do anything he likes including take over the world and turn America into a nightmarish police state.

MP3 here.

William Norman Grigg writes the Pro Libertate blog and is the founder and editor of The Right Source.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_10_grigg.mp3]

Tony Benn

Former British MP Tony Benn discusses the departure of Tony Blair, what a liar he is, the antiwar movement and whether it’s a good idea to prosecute leaders or follow the peace and reconciliation commissions model of getting justice for war criminals and Blair’s likely successor.

MP3 here.

He was a Cabinet minister in the Wilson and Callaghan governments from 1964 – 79, as Minister of Technology, Secretary of State for both Industry and Energy and President of the Council of European Energy ministers in 1977.

An elected member of the National Executive Committee of the Labour party from 1959 – 1994, he was Chairman of the Party in 1971/2.

He is a member of the Transport and General Workers Union and the National Union of Journalists, and an honorary member of the National Union of Mineworkers.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/aw051107tonybenn.mp3]:

Sen. Mike Gravel

Former Alaska Senator Mike Gravel discusses the reasons behind his campaign for president, his legacy as prime mover in ending the draft in the 1970s and publisher of the Pentagon Papers, why the Washington Post is so frightened

about the idea of allowing the American people to see real dissenters on the Televised debates, the tremendous response he received from the first debate, Edwards, Hillary and Obama’s promise that “all options are on the table” for dealing with Iran, his plan to make it a felony for Bush to continue the war, to have the power of petition on the national level, AIPAC’s role in the war and the Israel-Palestine conflict.

MP3 here. (38:51)

Senator Gravel enlisted in the U.S. Army (1951-54) and served as special adjutant in the Communication Intelligence Services and as a Special Agent in the Counter Intelligence Corps. He received a B.S. in Economics from Columbia University, New York City, and holds four honorary degrees in law and public affairs.

Mike Gravel served in the Alaska House of Representatives from 1963-66, and as Speaker from 1965-66. He then represented Alaska in the U.S. Senate from 1969-81. He served on the Finance, Interior, and Environmental and Public Works committees, chairing the Energy, Water Resources, Buildings and Grounds, and Environmental Pollution subcommittees.

In 1971, he waged a successful one-man filibuster for five months that forced the Nixon administration to cut a deal, effectively ending the draft in the United States. He is most prominently known for his release of the Pentagon Papers, the secret official study that revealed the lies and manipulations of successive U.S. administrations that misled the country into the Vietnam War. After the New York Times published portions of the leaked study, the Nixon administration moved to block any further publication of information and to punish any newspaper publisher who revealed the contents.

From the floor of the senate, Gravel (a junior senator at the time) insisted that his constituents had a right to know the truth behind the war and proceeded to read 4,100 pages of the 7,000 page document into the senate record. The Supreme Court ultimately ruled that Senator Gravel did not have the right and responsibility to share official documents with his constituents.

He then published The Senator Gravel Edition, The Pentagon Papers, Beacon Press (1971). This publication resulted in litigation, Gravel v. U.S., resulting in a landmark Supreme Court decision (No. 71-1017-1026) relative to the Speech and Debate Clause (Article 1, Section 6) of the United States Constitution.

He has worked as a cab driver in New York City, a clerk on Wall Street and as a brakeman on the Alaska Railroad. He founded and served as president of The Democracy Foundation, Philadelphia II, and Direct Democracy, nonprofit corporations dedicated to the establishment of direct democracy in the United States through the enactment of the National Initiative for Democracy by American voters.

Books authored by Senator Gravel are Jobs and More Jobs, and Citizen Power. He lectures and writes about governance, foreign affairs, economics, Social Security, tax reform, energy, environmental issues and democracy.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awmikegravel050907.mp3]

Robert Parry

Robert Parry of ConsortiumNews.com discusses the need he found to create a new home for investigative reporting back in the 1990s, explains the role of the old Iran-Contra criminals in running the war party today, evidence of George Bush Sr.’s role, the narrative of the “crazy” Iranian regime which was apparently plenty sane enough when this same crew sold them weapons to use against Iraq who the U.S. was also backing in the 1980s, the October Surprise, how Bush claims to follow the advice of his generals as he replaces them with ones sure to “agree” with him that the answer in Iraq is to escalate, why al Qaeda wants the U.S. to stay in Iraq, why they did 9/11 in the first place, the crazy theory that the President has unlimited power over an unlimited area forever, and the media narrative that Bush is some great decisive leader even though he is an idiot and a coward and their suppression of the story of the Florida recount in the election of the year 2000.

MP3 here. (43:00)

Robert Parry, who broke many of the Iran-Contra stories in the 1980s for the Associated Press and Newsweek, has written a new book, Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_11_parry.mp3]

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awphillipgiraldi050807.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi explains why he signed the joint letter with other former CIA officers demanding that former DCI Tenet give his book money to wounded soldiers and give up him medal of freedom, that lying a country into war is a war crime, Condoleeza Rice’s trip to Australia in the summer of 2006 and what it reveals about her abject ignorance of the world, whether Iraq’s WMDs were secreted away to Syria before the invasion, Dick Cheney’s trip to the Middle East to disrupt any chance of negotiation between Saudi Arabia and Iran and Israel and Syria, and whether there’s any chance the War Party will ever be held accountable.

MP3 here. (17:22)

Philip Giraldi is a former CIA agent, a partner in Cannistraro Associates, contributing editor to the American Conservative magazine and columnist for Antiwar.com.

Ellen Barfield

Ellen Barfield, of Veterans for Peace and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom Julia Ward Howe abolitionist mothers’ day calling for women to rise up to abolish war in the 1870, how Howe evolved from the author of the Battle Hymn of the Republic to antiwar leader, Barfield’s upcoming court appearance for harassing John McCain’s office in February and the upcoming “10,000 Mom March” against the war.

MP3 here. (15:13)

Ellen Barfield is the National Vice President of Veterans for Peace and a full-time peace and justice activist. She served in the U.S. Army from 1977-1981. She is also a member of the national boards of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), the War Resister’s League, and the School of the Americas Watch.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awellenbarfield051007.mp3]

Nir Rosen

Nir Rosen discuss his article “The Flight from Iraq,” about how that country doesn’t really exist anymore, Iraq’s refugee crisis, how many million they are, Riverbend’s exile, the complete destruction of Iraq’s middle and professional classes, the sad state of the refugees in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Iran and beyond, how the U.S. invasion and collaboration with the Iran parties is responsible for the new sectarian hatred between Sunnis and Shia Arabs in Iraq, the ethnic cleansing among those who remain, the growth of sectarianism and the civil war, John Bolton’s crass dismissal of his own responsibility, the massive new American “Embassy” in the green zone.

MP3 here. (18:02)

Nir Rosen is a journalist who has written extensively on American policy toward Afghanistan and Iraq. He spent more than two years in Iraq reporting on the American occupation, the relationship between Americans and Iraqis, the development of postwar Iraqi religious and political movements, interethnic and sectarian relations, and the Iraqi civil war. His reporting and research also focused on the origins and development of Islamist resistance, insurgency, and terrorist organizations. Mr. Rosen covered the elections in Afghanistan and the differences between the American presence in Afghanistan and Iraq. He has also reported from Somalia, where he investigated Islamist movements; Jordan, where he investigated the origins and future of the Zarqawi movement; and Pakistan, where he investigated the madrassas and pro-Taliban movements. Mr. Rosen’s book on postwar Iraq, In the Belly of the Green Bird: The Triumph of the Martyrs in Iraq, was published by Free Press in 2006. He has written for The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, The New Republic, Boston Review, Time, Mother Jones, and World Policy Journal.

As a Fellow at the New America Foundation, Mr. Rosen is working on a book about his travels in the post-9/11 Muslim world during the global war on terror. Mr. Rosen’s personal Website can be accessed at: NirRosen.com.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awnirrosen051007.mp3]

Edward Peck

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awedpeck061207.mp3]

Former ambassador Edward Peck discusses the Israeli attack on the USS Liberty in 1967 and the cover-up.

MP3 here. (16:56)

Peck, a former U.S. chief of mission in Iraq and former ambassador to Mauritania, was deputy director of the White House Task Force on Terrorism in the Reagan administration.

David Henderson

The Wartime Economist David R. Henderson explains the capitalist peace theory, Iran and opportunity cost, America’s relationship with China and the rising left-right-libertarian alliance against empire.

MP3 here.

David R. Henderson is a research fellow with the Hoover Institution and an associate professor of economics in the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy at the Naval Postgraduate School. He is author of The Joy of Freedom: An Economist’s Odyssey and editor of The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics, available online. His latest book, co-authored with Charles L. Hooper, is Making Great Decisions in Business and Life.

He has appeared on The O’Reilly Factor, the Jim Lehrer Newshour, CNN, and C-SPAN. He has had over 100 articles published in Fortune, the Wall Street Journal, Red Herring, Barron’s, National Review, Reason, the Los Angeles Times, USA Today, and the Christian Science Monitor. He has also testified before the House Ways and Means Committee, the Senate Armed Services Committee, and the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Visit his website.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_09_henderson.mp3]

Robert Dreyfuss

Robert Dreyfuss, investigative journalist and author of Devil’s Game: How the United States Helped Unleash Fundamentalist Islam discusses the situation on the ground now in Iraq due to Bush’s policy of refusing to support any faction that actually want to form a multi-ethnic coalition due simply to the fact that the leaders who want to hold Iraq together are the same ones who want the U.S. out (Sadr and the Sunni insurgency) while supporting the Iran-backed factions (the Da’wa Party and the Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq) who have no interest in making concessions to the Sunnis at all as more and more American troops keep showing up to do their job for them.

Also a bit of the history of American support for Islamic fundamentalism since World War II.

MP3 here.

For nearly fifteen years Robert Dreyfuss has worked as an independent journalist who specializes in magazine features, profiles, and investigative stories in the areas of politics and national security. In 2001, he was profiled as a leading investigative journalist by the Columbia Journalism Review, and two of his articles have won awards from The Washington Monthly. In 2003, Dreyfuss was awarded Project Censored’s first prize for a story on the role of oil in U.S. policy toward Iraq.He has appeared on scores of radio and television talk shows, including Hannity and Colmes on Fox News, C-Span, CNBC, MSNBC, Court TV, and, on National Public Radio, The Diane Rehm Show and Public Interest with Kojo Nnamdi, and Pacifica’s Democracy Now! with Amy Goodman.

Based in Alexandria, Va., Dreyfuss been writing for Rolling Stone for at least a decade, and currently covers national security for Rolling Stone’s National Affairs section. He’s a contributing editor at The Nation, a contributing writer at Mother Jones, and a senior correspondent for The American Prospect. His articles have also appeared in The Washington Monthly, The New Republic, Newsday, Worth, California Lawyer, The Texas Observer, E, In These Times, The Detroit Metro Times, Public Citizen, Extra!, and, in Japan, in Esquire, Foresight and Nikkei Business. On line, he writes frequently for TomPaine.com, and produced a popular blog for Tom Paine called The Dreyfuss Report.

Dreyfuss is best known for ground-breaking stories about the war in Iraq, the war on terrorism, and post-9/11 U.S. foreign policy. In 2002, he wrote the first significant profile of Ahmed Chalabi by a journalist, for The American Prospect. Also in 2002, he wrote the first analysis of the war between the Pentagon and the CIA over policy toward Iraq, which included the first important account of the Pentagon’s Office of Special Plans. Other stories in The American Prospect included detailed accounts of neoconservative war plans for the broader Middle East. In 2004, he co-authored what is still the most complete account of the work of the Office of Special Plans in manufacturing misleading or false intelligence about Iraq, for Mother Jones, entitled “The Lie Factory.”

Before 9/11, Dreyfuss wrote extensively about intelligence issues, including pieces about post-Cold War excursions by the CIA into economic espionage, about the CIA’s nonofficial cover (NOC) program, and about lobbying by U.S. defense and intelligence contractors over the annual secret intelligence budget.

Among his many other pieces, Dreyfuss has profiled organizations, including the Democratic Leadership Council, the Center for American Progress, the National Rifle Association, the NAACP, the Human Rights Campaign, and Handgun Control. He has also profiled Vermont Governor Howard Dean, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, House Majority Whip Tom DeLay, conservative activist Grover Norquist, House Ways & Means Committee Chairman Bill Thomas, Senator John McCain, and, in 1999, Texas Governor George W. Bush. One of his most important pieces was the result of a weeks-long visit to Vietnam in 1999, where he wrote about the effects of Agent Orange dioxin in Vietnam since the 1970s. His stories on the privatization of Social Security and the politics of Medicare and Medical Savings Accounts have been widely cited.

Dreyfuss is a member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA) and Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE). He graduated from Columbia University.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_11_dreyfuss.mp3]

Michael Scheuer

Former CIA analyst Michael Scheuer discusses the open letter [.pdf] he and other former CIA officials wrote to George Tenet, the responsibility Tenet bears for the war and for failing to kill Osama bin Laden in the 1990’s, his excuse(?) that the “slam dunk” referred to lying us into war rather than the presence of WMD, Dick Durbin’s recent admission that he knew the war was based on lies and his responsibility for staying quiet, the Constitution’s requirement that Congress hold responsibility for declaring war, his belief that Osama is still alive, al Qaeda’s ability to quickly replace their leadership, Bush’s renewed invocation of Osama to justify the war in Iraq and threats against Iran and the fact that there was no pre-war link between Iraq and al Qaeda.

MP3 here. (17: 10)

Michael Scheuer is a 22-year veteran of the CIA and the author of Imperial Hubris: Why the West Is Losing the War on Terror.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awmichaelsheurer050307.mp3]

Gen. William Odom

Gen. William Odom discusses the “worst strategic disaster in American history,” the war in Iraq: the view of most generals that the war is wrong, the failure of the politicians to see the consequences of their actions, the centrality of the neoconservatives and the Israel lobby in pushing for the Iraq invasion, the “surge,” Bush’s siding with the Iran factions even though the Iraqi Shia don’t want them, the crisis of Iraq’s four million refugees and it’s possible consequences, the tenuous alliance between Iraq’s Sunnis and al Qaeda, the fact that a September 11th worth of Iraqis die every month in that country, his view of George Tenet and Colin Powell’s failure to resign before the war and the possibility of war with Iran.

MP3 here. (18:47)

Lieutenant General William E. Odom, U.S. Army (Ret.), is a Senior Fellow with Hudson Institute and a professor at Yale University. As Director of the National Security Agency from 1985 to 1988, he was responsible for the nation’s signals intelligence and communications security. From 1981 to 1985, he served as Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence, the Army’s senior intelligence officer.

From 1977 to 1981, General Odom was Military Assistant to the President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs, Zbigniew Brzezinski. As a member of the National Security Council staff, he worked upon strategic planning, Soviet affairs, nuclear weapons policy, telecommunications policy, and Persian Gulf security issues. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1954, and received a Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1970.

General Odom’s latest book, America’s Inadvertent Empire, co-authored with Robert Dujarric, was published in early 2004 by Yale University Press. His previous book, Fixing Intelligence For a More Secure America, was published in January 2003 (Yale University Press). His book, The Collapse of the Soviet Military (Yale University Press, 1998), won the Marshall Shulman Prize. General Odom has also written (American University Press, 1993); America’s Military Revolution: Strategy and Structure After the Cold WarTrial After Triumph: East Asia After the Cold War (Hudson Institute, 1992); On Internal War: American and Soviet Approaches to Third World Clients and Insurgents (Duke University Press, 1992); and The Soviet Volunteers (Princeton University Press, 1973). He coauthored Commonwealth or Empire? Russia, Central Asia, and the Transcaucasus with Robert Dujarric (Hudson Institute, 1995).

General Odom has published articles in Foreign Affairs, World Politics, Foreign Policy, Orbis, Problems of Communism, The National Interest, The Washington Quarterly, Military Review, and many other publications. A frequent radio and television commentator, he has appeared on programs such as “The PBS News Hour,” CNN, ABC’s “Nightline”, NBC News, C-Span, and BBC’s “The World Tonight.” He also is a periodic contributor to the op-ed pages of The NewYork Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and others.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awgenodom051007.mp3]

Liam Madden

Liam Madden, co-founder of the Appeal for Redress explains how and why he and thousands of other soldiers are protesting the Iraq war through their communication with Congress.

MP3 here. (8:02)

Liam Madden is a Veteran of a four-year tour of service in the U.S. Marine Corps, including seven months in Iraq. After returning to the United States, Sergeant Madden seized the opportunity to mobilize his fellow service members to speak out against the illegal, unjustified, and never-ending occupation of Iraq.

Liam is a co-founder of the Appeal for Redress, a campaign of active service members who are appealing to congress to remove all American military forces and bases from Iraq. From within the ranks of the military Sergeant Madden has been propelled to the forefront of the anti-war movement. In building the Appeal for Redress Liam has dedicated the last few months to being a leading activist and acting as a media spokesperson for the 1,200 service men and women who have signed the Appeal.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awliammadden.mp3]

Michael Klare

Michael Klare discusses his article his TomsDispatch.com piece, “Warships, Warships Everywhere, and Many a Bomb to Drop” counts the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier strike forces building up within striking range of Iran.

MP3 here. (16:22)

Michael T. Klare is the Five College Professor of Peace and World Security Studies (a joint appointment at Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst), and Director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies (PAWSS), a position he has held since 1985. Before assuming his present post, he served as Director of the Program on Militarism and Disarmament at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, D.C. (1977-84).

Michael Klare serves on the board of directors of the Arms Control Association, the National Council of the Federation of American Scientists, and the advisory board of the Arms Division of Human Rights Watch; he is also a member of the Committee on International Security Studies of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awmichaelklare.mp3]

Geoffrey Perret

Geoffrey Perret discusses his new book Commander In Chief: How Truman, Johnson, and Bush Turned a Presidential Power into a Threat to America’s Future and how the wars in Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq and the consequences for Americans.

MP3 here. (16:57)

Geoffrey Perret was educated at Harvard University and the University of California at Berkeley. He was enlisted in the U.S. Army for three years and is the author of the acclaimed books Ulysses S. Grant and Eisenhower. He lives in England with his wife.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awgeoffreyperret.mp3]

Senator Mike Gravel

On my radio show May 7th, I spoke with former Alaska Senator Mike Gravel, who made a big splash April 26th at the first debate among Democrats seeking the nomination for president when he said that the “top tier” candidates all “frighten” him with their “all options must remain on the table for dealing with Iran” rhetoric and with his proposal to make it a felony for the president to continue the occupation of Iraq.

“Some of these people [the other candidates] frighten me. When you have mainline candidates that turn around and say “there’s nothing off the table with respect to Iran. That’s code for using nukes, nuclear devices. I’ve got to tell you, if I’m President of the United States, there will be no preemptive wars with nuclear devices. In my mind, it’s immoral, and it’s been immoral for the last 50 years as part of American foreign policy. …

“How do you get out? You pass the law, not a resolution, a law making it a felony to stay there.”

You can watch the debate on the Web or you can read the transcript here. Just Senator Gravel here.

I gave him an hour to elaborate on these ideas and others, including how the Iraq war has strengthened Iran’s position in the Middle East, their nuclear program, his proposal for opening friendly relations rather than threatening them, the neoconservatives’ doctrine of global hegemony, his plan for direct democracy and the U.S. military’s war against their veterans.

You can listen by clicking here. (58:54)

Senator Gravel enlisted in the U.S. Army (1951-54) and served as special adjutant in the Communication Intelligence Services and as a Special Agent in the Counter Intelligence Corps. He received a B.S. in Economics from Columbia University, New York City, and holds four honorary degrees in law and public affairs.

Mike Gravel served in the Alaska House of Representatives from 1963-66, and as Speaker from 1965-66. He then represented Alaska in the U.S. Senate from 1969-81. He served on the Finance, Interior, and Environmental and Public Works committees, chairing the Energy, Water Resources, Buildings and Grounds, and Environmental Pollution subcommittees.

In 1971, he waged a successful one-man filibuster for five months that forced the Nixon administration to cut a deal, effectively ending the draft in the United States. He is most prominently known for his release of the Pentagon Papers, the secret official study that revealed the lies and manipulations of successive U.S. administrations that misled the country into the Vietnam War. After the New York Times published portions of the leaked study, the Nixon administration moved to block any further publication of information and to punish any newspaper publisher who revealed the contents.

From the floor of the senate, Gravel (a junior senator at the time) insisted that his constituents had a right to know the truth behind the war and proceeded to read 4,100 pages of the 7,000 page document into the senate record. The Supreme Court ultimately ruled that Senator Gravel did not have the right and responsibility to share official documents with his constituents.

He then published The Senator Gravel Edition, The Pentagon Papers, Beacon Press (1971). This publication resulted in litigation, Gravel v. U.S., resulting in a landmark Supreme Court decision (No. 71-1017-1026) relative to the Speech and Debate Clause (Article 1, Section 6) of the United States Constitution.

He has worked as a cab driver in New York City, a clerk on Wall Street and as a brakeman on the Alaska Railroad. He founded and served as president of The Democracy Foundation, Philadelphia II, and Direct Democracy, nonprofit corporations dedicated to the establishment of direct democracy in the United States through the enactment of the National Initiative for Democracy by American voters.

Other books authored by Senator Gravel are Jobs and More Jobs, and Citizen Power. He lectures and writes about governance, foreign affairs, economics, Social Security, tax reform, energy, environmental issues and democracy.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_07_gravel.mp3]

Greg Palast

Greg Palast, investigative reporter for the BBC, Guardian newspapers and Harper’s, and author of Armed Madhouse, discusses GOP efforts to prevent soldiers from voting and the international oil politics surrounding America’s relationships with Venezuela, Iraq, Iran and Saudi Arabia.

MP3 here. (46:56)

Greg Palast is the author of the New York Times bestseller, Armed Madhouse (Penguin 2006). His first reports appeared on BBC television and in the Guardian newspapers. Author of another New York Times bestseller, The Best Democracy Money Can Buy, Palast is best known in his native USA as the journalist who, for the Observer (UK), broke the story of how Jeb Bush purged thousands of Black Florida citizens from voter rolls before the 2000 election, thereby handing the White House to his brother George. His reports on the theft of election 2004, the spike of the FBI investigations of the bin Ladens before September 11, the secret State Department documents planning the seizure of Iraq’s oil fields have won him a record six “Project Censored” for reporting the news American media doesn’t want you to hear. He returned to America to report for Harper’s magazine.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_03_palast.mp3]

Chris Floyd

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_04_30_floyd.mp3]

Chris Floyd, author of Empire Burlesque: High Crimes and Low Comedy in the Bush Imperium, explains America’s proxy war in Somalia and some of the liars in the mass media who aid and abet this mass murder.

MP3 here. (48:42)

Chris Floyd is an award-winning American journalist, and author of the book, Empire Burlesque: High Crimes and Low Comedy in the Bush Regime. For more than 11 years he wrote the featured political column, Global Eye, for The Moscow Times and the St. Petersburg Times in Russia. He also served as UK correspondent for Truthout.org, and was an editorial writer for three years for The Bergen Record. His work appears regularly CounterPunch, The Baltimore Chronicle and in translation in the Italian paper, Il Manifesto, and has also been published in such venues as The Nation, the Christian Science Monitor, Columbia Journalism Review, The Ecologist and many others. His articles are also featured regularly on such websites as Information Clearing House, Buzzflash, Bushwatch, LewRockwell.com, Antiwar.com, and many others. His work has been cited in The New York Times, USA Today, the Guardian, the Independent and other major newspapers.

Floyd co-founded the blog Empire Burlesque with webmaster Richard Kastelein, who created the site using open-source software. Floyd is also chief editor of Atlantic Free Press, which was founded and designed by Kastelein. Floyd has been a writer and editor for more than 25 years, working in the United States, Great Britain and Russia for various newspapers, magazines, the U.S. government and Oxford University.

Joshua Kors

Joshua Kors follows up on his Nation article “How Specialist Town Lost His Benefits” about how the U.S. army uses made-up psychological jargon to deny those wounded in their wars the benefits they’ve been promised.

MP3 here. (13:41)

Joshua Kors is a freelance journalist based in New York. Research support was provided by the Investigative Fund of The Nation Institute.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/050207joshuakors.mp3]

Jonathan Schwarz

Jonathan Schwarz, author of Our Kampf and the blog A Tiny Revolution, reviews former Director of Central Intelligence George Tenet’s book At the Center of the Storm.

MP3 here. (58:22)

Jonathan Schwarz has written for many publications, including the New Yorker, New York Times, Atlantic, Wall Street Journal, Slate, Esquire and Village Voice. He’s also contributed material to Saturday Night Live and National Public Radio.

His website is named after something George Orwell once said: “Every joke is a tiny revolution.”

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/07_05_02_schwarz.mp3]