Scott Horton Interviews Dahr Jamail

Scott Horton, August 07, 2008

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Dahr Jamail, reporter for IPS News and author of Beyond the Green Zone, discusses the new effort by the Maliki government to allow the former Sunni insurgency – now known at the “Sons of Iraq” or “Concerned Local Citizens” – into the police forces in Baquba in order to fight “al Qaeda in Iraq,” the various militias’ within the government and their primary loyalties, precarious politics in Kirkuk, Maliki’s statements in favor of American withdrawal, the irony of the U.S. backing the also-Iranian-backed Dawa Party and Supreme Islamic Council since the elections of ’05 and danger to U.S. troops in the event of war with Iran.

MP3 here. (37:48)

In late 2003, Weary of the overall failure of the US media to accurately report on the realities of the war in Iraq for the Iraqi people and US soldiers, Dahr Jamail went to Iraq to report on the war himself.

His dispatches were quickly recognized as an important media resource. He is now writing for the Inter Press Service, The Asia Times and many other outlets. His reports have also been published with The Nation, The Sunday Herald, Islam Online, the Guardian, Foreign Policy in Focus, and the Independent to name just a few. Dahr’s dispatches and hard news stories have been translated into French, Polish, German, Dutch, Spanish, Japanese, Portuguese, Chinese, Arabic and Turkish. On radio as well as television, Dahr reports for Democracy Now!, the BBC, and numerous other stations around the globe. Dahr is also special correspondent for Flashpoints.

Dahr has spent a total of 8 months in occupied Iraq as one of only a few independent US journalists in the country. In the MidEast, Dahr has also has reported from Syria, Lebanon and Jordan. Dahr uses the DahrJamailIraq.com website and his popular mailing list to disseminate his dispatches.

3 Responses to “Dahr Jamail”

  1. Are the shia not Iraquis? Is it strictly correct to talk about the majority population as an enemy within? During 8 years of iran iraq war, did the shia population not fight? Is Iran, currently threatened, sanctioned, a great beneficiary? Really? Who improvises these half-baked stories?

  2. I think you misunderstand. The Dawa Party and Supreme Islamic Council – who spent the Iran-Iraq war in Iran – the Shia who are being propped up in power by the US and Iran, are not “the Shia” at all, simply the ones given the power. For example, super majorities of Iraqi Shia (like the Sunni) want the US to leave. The SIIC’s Badr Corps (aka: the “Iraqi Army”) does not.
    http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2008/08/11/iraqi_specialforces/

    Other experts such as Patrick Cockburn (archive of today’s show forthcoming) agree that the Iranian government has the best possible government in Iraq that they could hope for. The US has marginalized all nationalist factions in favor of the pro-Iran factions simply because they are the minority among the majority Shia and so need US support and provide the excuse to stay forever.

  3. ‘Too unstable to leave.’

    ‘Too stable to leave.’

    Indeed. Well, let’s face it. ‘Leaving’ is not on the agenda. Those super-bases and the mega-embassy aren’t tents.

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