Scott Horton Interviews Chris Deliso

Scott Horton, September 08, 2008

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Chris Deliso, author of The Coming Balkan Caliphate and director of Balkanalysis.com, discusses the recent attack on South Ossetia by Georgia, the historic relationships between Georgians, Ossetians, Abkhazians, and Russians, the Rose revolution, the role of control over oil pipelines plays in the crisis, the potential conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia, the danger in our war guarantees of countries surrounding Russia and the American war party’s ever increasing belligerence.

MP3 here. (42:47)

Balkanalysis.com director Christopher Deliso has lived and traveled widely in SE Europe and has a master’s degree with distinction in Byzantine Studies from Oxford University (1999). His two new books, The Coming Balkan Caliphate: The Threat of Radical Islam to Europe and the West and Hidden Macedonia: The Mystic Lakes of Ohrid and Prespa will appeal to readers interested in, respectively, the major security issues involving the region today, and travel in one of Europe’s most fascinating but least visited areas.

Since 2001, he has published many articles on Balkan politics, economics, security issues, travel, history and culture in US and world newspapers, analysis firms such as the Economist Intelligence Unit, and in numerous magazines and websites. He is also a travel writer for Lonely Planet, covering SE Europe.

One Response to “Chris Deliso”

  1. This interview was conducted a few days after Turkish president Abdullah Gul made a visit to Armenia (September 6) and a few days before Gul went to Azerbaijan (September 10 or so–don’t remember the exact date now). Turkey had closed its border with Armenia in 1993 in support of Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh.

    I don’t think that there is any danger of a flare-up of the Nagorno-Karabakh issue at the moment because it appears that Turkey has an interest in settling so-called “separatist” issues in the region because of events in Georgia.

    Turkey sees Georgia as a critical area for energy transport as well as an entryway into Central Asia, however Russia is Turkey’s number one trading partner so it will be very interesting to see how the new changes in regional hegemony will play out.

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