Scott Horton Interviews Tim Cavanaugh

Scott Horton, November 18, 2008

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Tim Cavanaugh, columnist for Reason magazine, discusses the efforts of activist Lira Tskhovrebova to tell the South Ossetian side of the Georgian invasion, the numerous accounts of Georgian soldiers deliberately killing civilians, the U.S. media failure to accurately portray the conflict and the mixed signals Saakashvili received from U.S. neocon agitators and the State Department.

MP3 here. (34:08)

Tim Cavanaugh represents Lira Tskhoverbova, chairwoman of the Association of South Ossetian Women for Democracy and Human Rights. He is a columnist for Reason magazine and former web editor for the Los Angeles Times.

2 Responses to “Tim Cavanaugh”

  1. Population of South Ossetia is 70,000. Population of North Ossetia is 700,000. Naturaly South Ossetians would prefer to hook up with Russia, not just for protection, but because it would mean they would be united with their kin in North Ossetia.

    Russia was always going to aid South Ossetia, not just because of geopolitics, but because a Russian president can not ignore his North Ossetian constituency. Esspecialy since Ossetians are seen as traditional Russian friend and allies.

    Scott, why do you always ask about wether South Ossetia has been historicaly under the control of a Georgian state or not? What does it matter to an anarchist? South Ossetians are not immigrants, they have lived on this land for a fair bit of time, surely they have the right to break free of Georgia if that is their will.

    And anyways before the Bolsheviks it was all part of the Russian Empire so it is a moot question. Interestingly enough though Russian Empire annexed Georgia after an expressed request by Georgians to do so. They sent a letter to the Tsar asking if they can be annexed. Infact there is more to the irony, because just as today Russia protects South Ossetians from Georgia, back then Russia protected Georgians from Persia and the Ottoman Empire. So historicaly Russian-Georgian relations have actualy been pretty good. Not at all any worse than Russian-Ossetian relations. This rivalry is a relativley new thing. A 1990s thing.

  2. [...] Death and Deception in South Ossetia Tim Cavanaugh interviewed by Scott Horton [...]

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