Glenn Greenwald

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_29_greenwald.mp3]

Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald discusses the Justice Department’s proposal to keep 50 Guantanamo inmates imprisoned forever without trial, the current 3-tiered justice system that provides the most generous legal forum that still guarantees a conviction, the problem with conferring “prisoner of war” status on Guantanamo detainees and the unaccountable “presidential assassinations” authorized by the Bush and Obama administrations.

MP3 here. (17:06)

Glenn Greenwald was a constitutional lawyer in New York City, first at the Manhattan firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, and then at the litigation firm he founded, Greenwald, Christoph. Greenwald litigated numerous high-profile and significant constitutional cases in federal and state courts around the country, including multiple First Amendment challenges. He has a J.D. from New York University School of Law (1994) and a B.A. from George Washington University (1990). In October of 2005, Greenwald started a political and legal blog, Unclaimed Territory, which quickly became one of the most popular and highest-trafficked in the blogosphere.

Upon disclosure by the New York Times in December 2005 of President Bush’s warrantless eavesdropping program, Greenwald became one of the leading and most cited experts on that controversy. In early 2006, he broke a story on his blog regarding the NSA scandal that served as the basis for front-page articles in the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers, all of which credited his blog for the story. Several months later, Sen. Russ Feingold read from one of Greenwald’s posts during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Feingold’s resolution to censure the president for violating FISA. In 2008, Sen. Chris Dodd read from Greenwald’s Salon blog during floor debate over FISA. Greenwald’s blog was also cited as one of the sources for the comprehensive report issued by Rep. John Conyers titled “The Constitution in Crisis.” In 2006, he won the Koufax Award for best new blog.

Greenwald is the author of A Tragic Legacy: How a Good vs. Evil Mentality Destroyed the Bush Presidency, How Would a Patriot Act? Defending American Values from a President Run Amok and Great American Hypocrites: Toppling the Big Myths of Republican Politics.

Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_29_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the journalists attempting to rebut his Guantanamo “suicides” expose, the strong resemblance of Joe Carter‘s critiques to those of a Department of Defense public affairs officer, the hassle of dealing with straw man arguments, more evidence that Camp “No” does indeed exist, the ease of controlling the flow of information within a secure military installation and how government “conspiracies” are often nothing more than staying “on message.”

MP3 here. (37:15)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

David Bromwich

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_28_bromwich.mp3]

David Bromwich, professor of literature at Yale University, discusses American ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry’s recommendation against a troop surge that Obama ignored, Eikenberry’s concern that continued US assistance will indefinitely delay Afghan independence and self sufficiency, Obama’s decision to forgo an Iraq Study Group-type reevaluation of policy on Afghanistan, the odd NYT note (end of article) that Robert Gates watched the military-coup movie Seven Days in May, Obama’s odd and infuriating contradictions between his speech-making and policy choices and why US resources would be better spent preventing a failed state in Mexico rather than Afghanistan.

MP3 here. (48:00)

David Bromwich teaches literature at Yale. He has written on politics and culture for The New Republic, The Nation, The New York Review of Books, and other magazines. He is editor of Edmund Burke’s selected writings On Empire, Liberty, and Reform and co-editor of the Yale University Press edition of On Liberty.

Maj. Todd E. Pierce

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_27_pierce.mp3]

Major Todd E. Pierce, a Judge Advocate General representing Guantanamo inmate Ali al-Bahlul, discusses the appeal of his client’s conviction for – among other things – making al Qaeda propaganda videos, how Congress exceeding its authority by passing the Military Commissions Act (MCA), pertinent First Amendment and court precedent issues, the misuse of the “define and punish” clause in Article 1, Section 8, of the Constitution, the effective worldwide criminalization of any expression of dissent against the US government and how existing laws and courts were perfectly capable of handling terrorism cases.

MP3 here. (30:29)

Major Todd E. Pierce is a Judge Advocate General in the US Army Reserve.

Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_27_vlahos.mp3]

Kelley B. Vlahos, contributing editor at The American Conservative magazine, discusses the latest attempt by anti-Hugo Chavez members of Congress to get Venezuela on the “State Sponsors of Terrorism” list, unlikely allegations of collusion between al Qaeda and the FARC in drug smuggling operations, Israel’s promotion of a Hamas/Hezbollah/S. America link, the terrible New Yorker articles of Jeffrey Goldberg and the big logical leap of inferring government sponsorship of terrorism from the donations of individuals.

MP3 here. (28:00)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos, a Washington, D.C.-based freelance writer, is a longtime political reporter for FoxNews.com and a contributing editor at The American Conservative. She is a featured Antiwar.com columnist and Washington correspondent for Homeland Security Today magazine.

Gene Jones

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_26_jones.mp3]

This interview was conducted by Antiwar Radio producer Angela Keaton.

Gene Jones, president of Florida Veterans for Common Sense, discusses his organization’s resolution opposing the Afghan War escalation, the (literally) incalculable cost of national defense, the strain on the military from too many deployments and the ridiculous plan to have 100,000 troops in Afghanistan to fight 100 members of al Qaeda.

MP3 here. (12:24)

Gene Jones is president of Florida Veterans for Common Sense.

Mark Ames

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_26_ames.mp3]

Mark Ames, regular writer for The eXiled, discusses Russia’s transition from neoliberal Yeltsin to nationalist Putin, the US “economic hit men” advisers to Yeltsin who facilitated the rise of the oligarchs, the huge decline in Russian life-expectancy rates in the 1990s, the trail of economic disasters left in Larry Summers‘ wake, how the “cakewalk” victory of Gulf War I increased American bravado and militarism, the end of US meritocracy and why a more vigorous opposition is needed to stop the War Party.

MP3 here. (54:57)

Mark Ames is the author of Going Postal: Rage, Murder and Rebellion From Reagan’s Workplaces to Clinton’s Columbine and Beyond and The eXile: Sex, Drugs and Libel in the New Russia. He is a regular contributor to eXiled Online and The Nation magazine.

Robert Dreyfuss

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_26_dreyfuss.mp3]

Robert Dreyfuss, author of The Dreyfuss Report blog for The Nation, discusses the conflict between Obama and Gen. Petraeus over an Afghanistan withdrawal timetable, why a left-right alliance is unlikely because of intransigence on domestic issues and disinterest in foreign policy, the shifting Iraqi political coalitions that may indicate another poor electoral showing for Shiite religious parties and why the shut-out of US oil companies vying for Iraqi oil contracts lessens the incentive for military occupation.

MP3 here. (29:40)

Robert Dreyfuss, a Nation contributing editor, is an investigative journalist in Alexandria, Virginia, specializing in politics and national security. He is the author of Devil’s Game: How the United States Helped Unleash Fundamentalist Islam and is a frequent contributor to Rolling Stone, The American Prospect, and Mother Jones.

Jonathan Williams

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_20_williams.mp3]

This interview is conducted by Antiwar Radio producer Angela Keaton.

Jonathan Williams, coordinator of the Student Peace Action Network, discusses his anti-recruitment presentations that focus on educating kids on the realities of – and alternatives to – military service, the Army Experience Center (AEC) near Philadelphia that uses military props and video games to recruit and why new benefits in the revised GI Bill should not be counted on.

MP3 here. (12:13)

Part 2

Jonathan Williams is the Student Peace Action Network coordinator. He is also involved in the campaign to shut down the AEC.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_22_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses the two-party conspiracy against justice since the Independent Counsel‘s expiration in 1999, the thousands of illegal FBI wiretaps excused as mere “technical violations” by apologists, the dumbing down of the Bill of Rights and the barriers to enforcing a police state in the US.

MP3 here. (37:30)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

Daphne Eviatar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_22_eviatar.mp3]

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the Brookings Institution study that recommends codifying indefinite detention without trial, the government’s refusal to release some Guantanamo detainees who won their habeas corpus hearings and how the never ending “war on terror” complicates the traditional practice of holding prisoners “for the duration.”

MP3 here. (15:54)

Daphne Eviatar is a lawyer and freelance journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, The Nation, Legal Affairs, Mother Jones, the Washington Independent and many others. She is a Senior Reporter at The American Lawyer and was an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow in 2005 and a Pew International Journalism fellow in 2002.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_21_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses his disinterest in political parties, the slippery slope from indefinitely detaining foreign terrorism suspects to designating domestic criminals “enemy combatants,” why the US empire is more likely to end from the dollar’s collapse than a reasoned decision to return to a republic, the diminishing returns from intelligence spending and why reestablishing gold and silver as currency is a good idea.

MP3 here. (29:49)

Part 2, Part 3

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and Freedom Under Siege. His archived columns for Antiwar.com appear at http://original.antiwar.com/paul

Christopher Manion

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_21_manion.mp3]

Christopher Manion, columnist for the weekly Catholic newspaper The Wanderer, discusses the two conflicting currents within the Conservative momement, the marked difference between Sarah Palin’s carefully crafted image and her actual policy positions, the rotten core of the GOP that is best left to the next generation to fix, the public’s misguided reliance on symbolism to categorize political figures and why neoconservatives are more correctly called neoliberals.

MP3 here. (22:46)

Christopher Manion writes regularly at LewRockwell.com and is a columnist for The Wanderer, America’s oldest independent Catholic newspaper, founded in 1868. He has taught politics, political theory and international relations at Boston University, Catholic University and the University of Dallas.

Michael Hastings

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_21_hastings.mp3]

Michael Hastings, author of the article “The Day Democracy Died in Iraq,” discusses US withdrawal plans that are hinged on an orderly Iraqi election in March, the surge’s failure to effect Sunni/Shia political reconciliation, Ahmed Chalabi’s involvement in banning Sunni and secular candidates and why the promise of military aid will likely guarantee Iraqi acceptance of US forces remaining beyond 2011.

MP3 here. (39:41)

Michael Hastings is the author of I Lost My Love in Baghdad: A Modern War Story. In 2008, he covered the U.S. presidential elections for Newsweek, and before that he was the magazine’s Baghdad correspondent. His articles have appeared in GQ, Slate, Salon, Foreign Policy, the LA Times, and other publications. His blog The Hastings Report focuses on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and other foreign policy topics.

Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_19_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the evidence in his article that the June 2006 Guantanamo inmate suicides were in fact homicides, the Seton Hall report that debunks the government cover-up story, Gitmo prison guards who saw the three inmates removed from their cells and transported toward infamous Camp “No” on the night they supposed hung themselves, the Camp America commander’s threatening reminder to Guantanamo servicemen to adhere to the official narrative and the involvement of the DOJ and FBI in the cover-up and in stifling Congressional investigations.

MP3 here. (39:28)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.


Brandon Neely

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_20_neely.mp3]

Former Guantanamo prison guard Brandon Neely discusses his recent reunion and reconciliation with two former Gitmo inmates now living in England, his regret for violently restraining a prisoner in an incident that better communication would have prevented, the total discretion of officers in deciding on the treatment of prisoners and the frequent use of Initial Reaction Force (IRF) teams for prisoner beatings rather than control and restraint.

MP3 here. (26:50)

Part 2, Part 3

Brandon Neely is a former Guantanamo prison guard and current Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW) member.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_19_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the “supermax” modernization program for Bagram prison in Afghanistan, the Bush administration’s dismantling of proper and longstanding military tribunals for determining a war prisoner’s status (used extensively in the first Gulf War), the Justice Department’s fight to preserve Bagram’s extralegal status, the secrecy still surrounding “ghost prisoners” held worldwide under US auspices and why the US refuses to release Gitmo prisoner Shaker Aamer.

MP3 here. (51:18)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and blogs at AndyWorthington.co.uk. His documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo is available on DVD.

Nathaniel Raymond

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_15_raymond.mp3]

Nathaniel Raymond, Director of the Campaign Against Torture at Physicians for Human Rights, discusses his organization’s investigation into the alleged massacre of Taliban prisoners in 2001, suspected war criminal Abdul Rashid Dostum’s connections with the CIA and Hamid Karzai’s government that shield him from accountability, three US government investigations into the alleged massacre that were impeded by Bush officials and why Obama needs to be pressured into hastening the massacre study he initiated.

MP3 here. (20:05)

Nathaniel Raymond is the Director of the Campaign Against Torture at Physicians for Human Rights. He currently leads PHR’s inquiry into the alleged 2001 Dasht-e-Leili massacre in northern Afghanistan and worked with the PHR team that discovered the mass grave site in 2002. Raymond has coordinated PHR’s work with investigative reporters probing the Dasht-e-Leili case and led the analysis of once-secret documents that PHR’s Freedom of Information Act lawsuit forced the government to divulge. He has interviewed former senior Bush administration officials about the Dasht-e-Leili case and has coordinated the collection of data and analysis from experts on international law, satellite imagery, and military affairs.

Raymond helped write the 2008 report, Broken Laws, Broken Lives: Medical Evidence of Torture by US Personnel and Its Impact. This report contains the first comprehensive, independent medical evaluations of former detainees held at Guantánamo Bay, Abu Ghraib, and Bagram Airbase in Afghanistan. The preface to the report was written by Major General Antonio Taguba (US Army—Retired).

Since 2006, Raymond has been PHR’s lead investigator of the role of health professionals—particularly psychologists—in the design, supervision and implementation of the Bush Administration’s regime of physical and psychological torture of detainees in US custody.

Raymond has served overseas with Oxfam America in Afghanistan, the Middle East, Ethiopia and Sri Lanka. In 2005, he was one of the coordinators of the Oxfam International response to the tsunami in South Asia and also worked on the ground in Mississippi as part of Oxfam’s response to Katrina. He has published several articles on international law and mass atrocities, and contributed to the NPR programs The Connection, The Story, and This American Life.

Dahr Jamail

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_14_jamail.mp3]

Independent journalist Dahr Jamail discusses the Army’s imprisonment of a stop-lossed soldier who expressed his frustration through music composition, military family problems and low morale caused by repeated deployments, the “psychological implosion” of many shell-shocked soldiers and the unprecedented military suicide rates that threaten to climb even higher.

MP3 here. (27:23)

Dahr Jamail, an independent journalist, is the author of The Will to Resist: Soldiers Who Refuse to Fight in Iraq and Afghanistan, and Beyond the Green Zone: Dispatches From an Unembedded Journalist in Occupied Iraq. Jamail reported from occupied Iraq for nine months as well as from Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Turkey over the last five years.

Stewart Rhodes

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_13_rhodes.mp3]

This interview is conducted by Antiwar Radio producer Angela Keaton.

Stewart Rhodes, founder and Director of Oath Keepers, discusses his organization’s focus on educating those in the military and law enforcement on their oath to defend the Constitution, the ten orders that oath keepers must not obey, preventing “tripwire” domestic events that may lead to insurrection or revolution and how executors of the law can use selective enforcement to keep both their oaths and their jobs.

MP3 here. (27:52)

Stewart Rhodes is the founder and Director of Oath Keepers. He is a U.S. Army veteran, Yale Law School graduate and former member of Rep. Ron Paul’s DC staff. He assisted teaching U.S. military history at Yale, was a Yale Research Scholar, and is writing a book on the dangers of applying the laws of war to the American people. He is a staff attorney with Jefferson Legal Foundation and has assisted in constitutional litigation in state and federal courts.

Stewart currently writes the monthly Enemy at the Gates column for S.W.A.T. Magazine, and has written for The Warrior, the journal of Gerry Spence’s Trial Lawyer’s College; for www.moreliberty.org; and for JPFO. Stewart has appeared on several radio shows, was invited to speak at Stanford University on unlawful enemy combatant status, and teaches classes on the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

John Feffer

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_13_feffer.mp3]

John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, discusses the US influence in remaking the Japanese government after WWII, the enduring popularity of Japan’s Peace Constitution, the Pentagon’s recognition that US military bases eventually overstay their welcome even in allied countries, the continued symbolic significance of US gestures of regret for Hiroshima and Nagasaki and how Japanese foreign policy is influenced by antipathy toward N. Korea.

MP3 here. (25:04)

John Feffer is co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author of several books and numerous articles. He has been a Writing Fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC and a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University. He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia. He has taught a graduate level course on international conflict at Sungkonghoe University in Seoul in July 2001 and delivered lectures at a variety of academic institutions including New York University, Hofstra, Union College, Cornell University, and Sofia University (Tokyo).

John has been widely interviewed in print and on radio. He serves on the advisory committees of the Alliance of Scholars Concerned about Korea. He is a recipient of the Herbert W. Scoville fellowship and has been a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation. He currently lives with his partner Karin Lee in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_12_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses the rare outspoken exception to the subdued White House press corps, the Obama administration’s refusal to explain the motivations of terrorists, the lack of contextual explanation in US media where history begins anew with each terrorist attack and how the US is fighting battles that Israel started.

MP3 here. (31:37)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Elaine Brower

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_12_brower.mp3]

Elaine Brower, military mom and member of the National Steering Committee of World Can’t Wait, discusses the popular reverence for the military that continues unabated, sanitized recruitment ads that give the impression military service is just paid job training, the debate over whether video game violence inspires real life violent acts and how military enlistment is portrayed as the only way to escape inner city poverty and unemployment.

MP3 here. (26:25)

Elaine Brower is a military mom, activist with Military Families Speak Out and Drive Out the Bush Regime and a member of the National Steering Committee of World Can’t Wait.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_12_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses the current generation of physically and emotionally damaged veterans churned out by the war machine, why “patriotism” no longer means adherence to the principles of the Declaration of Independence, the “cannibalism” stage of US empire, lessons to be learned from illegal immigrants who survive in the informal economy, a vision of an alternate history without Woodrow Wilson and 20th century warfare and why the US “synchronization” of previously separate government functions is a harbinger of totalitarianism.

MP3 here. (32:07)

Will Grigg writes the Pro Libertate blog and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_07_kpfk_margolis.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from Scott Horton’s January 7th guest host appearance on KPFK‘s Daily Briefing radio show. The full show is here.

Internationally syndicated columnist Eric Margolis discusses the infighting between intelligence agencies trying to deflect blame for the Detroit “underbomber,” the inordinate number of innocent civilians killed in predator drone missile strikes, the resonance of Osama bin Laden’s message with opponents of US imperialism and why the US would be wise to remember the phrase “He who defends everything defends nothing.”

MP3 here. (18:01)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular columnist with the Quebecor Media Company and a contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Juan Cole

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_07_kpfk_cole.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from Scott Horton’s January 7th guest host appearance on KPFK’s Daily Briefing radio show. The full show is here.

Juan Cole, author of Engaging the Muslim World, discusses the vulnerability of Iran’s Natanz uranium enrichment facility, the IAEA’s perfect record of preventing the production of nuclear weapons at continuously inspected sites, the bogus “leaks” published by sympathetic newspapers that generate support for military actions and how economic sanctions punish Iran for legally enriching uranium.

MP3 here. (19:27)

Juan Cole is the author of Engaging the Muslim World. He is a Professor of History at the University of Michigan and writes the “Informed Comment” blog at Juancole.com.

Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_07_kpfk_vlahos.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from Scott Horton’s January 7th guest host appearance on KPFK’s Daily Briefing radio show. The full show is here.

Kelley B. Vlahos, contributing editor at The American Conservative magazine, discusses the recent history of US intervention in Somalia, US military strikes made without regard for borders or national sovereignty in the “global war on terror” and how Bush administration policies gave rise to al Shabab and al Qaeda in Somalia.

MP3 here. (17:09)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos, a Washington, D.C.-based freelance writer, is a longtime political reporter for FoxNews.com and a contributing editor at The American Conservative. She is a featured Antiwar.com columnist and Washington correspondent for Homeland Security Today magazine.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_07_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for Inter Press Service, discusses the Iran “nuclear trigger” documents published in the Times of London that are only remade excerpts of an unknown original, how Iranian scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh went from university lecturer to purported head of Iran’s nuclear weapons program, loss of US interest in diplomacy with Iran while internal strife makes regime change possible and how Iran is purposefully creating uncertainty about its nuclear facilities to deter airstrikes against them.

MP3 here. (52:07)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Juan Cole

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_07_cole.mp3]

Juan Cole, author of Engaging the Muslim World, discusses the civil war in the Mandate for Palestine after the British Empire’s dissolution in the late 1940s, Gaza’s transformation into a blockaded prison, Israeli officials implicated in Gaza war crimes who risk arrest if they travel abroad, Egypt’s complicity in detaining human rights activists bringing aid to the occupied territories, the lingering effects of WWII devastation that are evident in the geopolitical passivity of European countries and why Obama deserves credit for an improved US image abroad and positive policy changes.

MP3 here. (33:44)

Juan Cole is the author of Engaging the Muslim World. He is a Professor of History at the University of Michigan and writes the “Informed Comment” blog at Juancole.com.

Matthew Harwood

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_06_harwood.mp3]

Matthew Harwood, author of the article  “New Year’s resolution for Guantanamo,” discusses some of the positive steps Obama has taken to restore constitutional government, the US public’s simultaneous distrust of the government and adoration of the military, the seldom discussed Military Commissions Act of 2009 and how the US culture of fear and paranoia is stoked by politicians and the media.

MP3 here. (29:33)

Matthew Harwood is a writer in Washington DC. His work has appeared in The Washington Monthly, The Huffington Post, The Columbia Journalism Review and elsewhere. He is currently working on a book about evangelical Christian rhetoric and aggressive US foreign policy.

Karen Kwiatkowski

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_06_kwiatkowski.mp3]

Karen Kwiatkowski, columnist at LewRockwell.com and retired USAF lieutenant colonel, discusses the dogged determination of Bush supporters who still believe the Iraq war lies, the laser-like neoconservative focus on Middle East policy, how several well-placed neocons hijacked the US government and started the war in Iraq, Donald Rumsfeld’s ultimate success at establishing military outpost “lily pads” and how George W. Bush let loose the neocon “crazies in the basement” his father warned about.

Background articles on Karen Kwiatkowski’s interaction with Douglas Feith’s Office of Special Plans:

The new Pentagon papers

2006 CSPAN interview by Brian Lamb

Career Officer Does Eye-Opening Stint Inside Pentagon

The Lie Factory

MP3 here. (26:32)

Karen Kwiatkowski is a retired USAF lieutenant colonel, who spent her final four and a half years in uniform working at the Pentagon. She is a columnist for LewRockwell.com and for militaryweek.com. She hosts the call-in radio show American Forum and blogs occasionally for Huffingtonpost.com and Liberty and Power.

Michael Scheuer

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_06_scheuer.mp3]

Michael Scheuer, author of Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq, discusses why he thinks the al Qaeda threat will continue to grow while the US occupies Muslim countries, why the Israel/Palestine dispute isn’t worth sacrificing American blood or treasure for, how US disengagement from the Middle East will allow Muslims to concentrate on their own considerable internal problems, humanitarian warmongers on the Left who are pushing for intervention in Africa, al Qaeda’s thorough infiltration of Yemen and why the US practice of torturing terrorism suspects should continue until more effective methods can be found.

MP3 here. (32:02)

Michael Scheuer is a 22-year veteran of the CIA and former head analyst at the CIA’s bin Laden unit. He is the author of Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq and Imperial Hubris: Why the West is Losing the War on Terror.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_05_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA and DIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the likely circumstances that allowed a Jordanian triple-agent to kill seven CIA operatives in Afghanistan, how the CIA’s limited ability to overcome cultural and language barriers forces a dangerous reliance on foreign intelligence services, Hillary Clinton’s declaration that Yemen is now a threat to the whole world, growing foreign and domestic opposition to the 2007 National Intelligence Estimate on Iran, newly discovered problems with the Iranian documents published by the Times of London, the massive disinformation campaign to provoke wars in Iran and Yemen and why Iran’s perfectly reasonable proposal to swap low-enriched uranium for nuclear fuel rods will probably be rejected by the US.

MP3 here. (44:40)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative, fellow at the American Conservative Defense Alliance and a regular columnist for Antiwar.com.

Sibel Edmonds

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_04_edmonds.mp3]

Former FBI contract translator-turned-whistleblower Sibel Edmonds discusses the corruption of “political termite” former Republican Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert, the systemic rot indicated by the disappearance of accountability and oversight in all levels of US government, pervasive political self-dealing and foreign espionage based in Chicago, bribes and lucrative salaries given to current and former US politicians by Turkish operatives, ignorant or apathetic voters that keep voting for incumbents, the special set of ethical and legal exceptions given to Israel and the bribery and espionage investigations that have targeted Dan Burton, Bob Livingston, Jane Harman and others in Congress.

MP3 here. (41:40)

Sibel Edmonds is the founder and president of the National Security Whistleblowers Coalition (NSWBC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to aiding national security whistleblowers. She has appeared on national radio and TV as a commentator on matters related to whistleblowers, national security, and excessive secrecy & classification, and has been featured on CBS 60 Minutes, CNN, MSNBC,  NPR, and in the New York Times, Washington Post, Vanity Fair, The American Conservative, and others. Her book, Shooting the Messenger, co-authored with Professor William Weaver, is forthcoming from Kansas University Press in the fall of 2010.

PEN American Center awarded Ms. Edmonds the 2006 PEN/Newman’s Own First Amendment Award for her “commitment to preserving the free flow of information in the United States in a time of growing international isolation and increasing government secrecy”. She is also the recipient of the 2004 Sam Adams Foundation Award.

Ms. Edmonds worked as a language specialist for the FBI’s Washington Field Office. During her work with the bureau, she discovered and reported serious acts of security breaches, cover-ups, and intentional blocking of intelligence that had national security implications. After she reported these acts to FBI management, she was retaliated against and ultimately fired in March 2002. Since that time, court proceedings on her issues have been blocked by the assertion of “State Secrets Privilege”, and the Congress of the United States has been gagged and prevented from any discussion of her case through retroactive re-classification issued by the Department of Justice.

Ms. Edmonds began her career in 1993 as Project Director for the Rostropovich Foundation, a non-profit humanitarian organization providing medical and food aid to children of the former Soviet Union. She re-located to St. Petersburg, Russia and managed correspondence, shipments, inventory and security precautions in the largest children’s hospital in St. Petersburg. Later, she worked as the Executive Director & Co-Founder of Edmonds Industries, a Consulting and Holding Company, investing in international business and residential real estate development. Ms. Edmonds also worked as a volunteer for the Alexandria CASA program (Court Appointed Special Advocate) for abused children, and as an instructor for the Alexandria Office on Women’s Domestic Violence Program.

Ms. Edmonds has a MA in Public Policy and International Commerce from George Mason University, a BA in Criminal Justice and Psychology from George Washington University, and AA degree in Science from NVCC. She is certified as a Court Appointed Special Advocate and as an instructor for the Women’s Domestic Violence Program. She is fluent in Turkish, Farsi and Azerbaijani.

Cindy Sheehan

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_12_30_sheehan.mp3]

Peace activist Cindy Sheehan discusses the Peace of the Action anti-empire protests beginning in March in Washington, DC, how current US wars are outlasting the public’s attention span and the need for focused antiwar goals to prevent division among allies and derision in the media.

MP3 here. (20:23)

Cindy Sheehan became a leader of the antiwar movement after her son, Casey, was killed in Iraq. Her efforts to get answers from President Bush, including a vigil in Crawford, Texas, have received national media attention. She has a website and radio show, is the author of Peace Mom: A Mother’s Journey through Heartache to Activism and wrote the introduction to 10 Excellent Reasons Not to Join the Military.

Becky Akers

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_12_30_akers.mp3]

Becky Akers, columnist at Lewrockwell.com, discusses her article “Christmas Kamikaze,” why blowing up a plane is not as easy as Hollywood makes it seem, boom-times for producers of millimeter wave scanner machines, foreign military adventures that beget terrorism at home and the fallacy of judicious and limited state-sponsored torture.

MP3 here. (28:20)

Becky Akers, an expert on the American Revolution, writes frequently about issues related to security and privacy. Her articles and columns have been published by LewRockwell.com, The Freeman, Military History Magazine, American History Magazine, the Christian Science Monitor, the New York Post, and other publications.

Daniel Ellsberg

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_01_ellsberg.mp3]

Daniel Ellsberg, the man who leaked the Pentagon Papers, discusses the losing battle of Robert Byrd and Edward Kennedy (who both presided as senators over the Tonkin Gulf Resolution in 1964) to defeat the Iraq War Resolution in 2002, LBJ’s decision to escalate the Vietnam War despite the prescient predictions of disaster by advisor Clark Clifford, the doublethink prospect of destabilizing Pakistan in order to stabilize it, how “effective” counterinsurgencies often provoke civil war, the re-arrest of Israeli whistleblower Mordechai Vanunu, the underestimation of Israel’s nuclear arsenal and the inadequacy of currently proposed treaties on nuclear weapons.

MP3 here. (1:00:14)

Daniel Ellsberg is the author of Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers and the articles “U.S. Nuclear War Planning for a Hundred Holocausts” and “Hiroshima Day: America Has Been Asleep at the Wheel for 64 Years.”

In 1959 Daniel Ellsberg worked as a strategic analyst at the RAND Corporation, and consultant to the Defense Department and the White House, specializing in problems of the command and control of nuclear weapons, nuclear war plans, and crisis decision-making. He joined the Defense Department in 1964 as Special Assistant to Assistant Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs), John McNaughton, working on Vietnam. He transferred to the State Department in 1965 to serve two years at the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, evaluating pacification on the front lines.

On return to the RAND Corporation in 1967, he worked on the Top Secret McNamara study of U.S. Decision-making in Vietnam, 1945-68, which later came to be known as the Pentagon Papers. In 1969, he photocopied the 7,000 page study and gave it to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee; in 1971 he gave it to the New York Times, the Washington Post and 17 other newspapers. His trial, on twelve felony counts posing a possible sentence of 115 years, was dismissed in 1973 on grounds of governmental misconduct against him, which led to the convictions of several White House aides and figured in the impeachment proceedings against President Nixon.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/09_12_31_margolis.mp3]

Internationally syndicated columnist Eric Margolis discusses the structure of a thoroughly propagandized populace, the al Qaeda moniker’s usefulness as the media’s lazy shorthand for “evildoers,” Yemen’s emergence as the “Afghanistan of the Arabian Peninsula,” the sovereign state of British intelligence otherwise known as the Sultanate of Oman, why Pakistan is wary of attacks on its nuclear installations, how Iranian protests are indicative of some level of political freedom – as compared to regional US allies, the current ill-repute of formerly respectable British newspapers and the daunting challenges for the US in the new year.

MP3 here. (48:32)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular columnist with the Quebecor Media Company and a contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

George Maschke

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/09_12_30_maschke.mp3]

George Maschke, professional Persian/English legal translator and co-founder of Antipolygraph.org, discusses the evidence that the Iranian nuclear documents disclosed by the London Times are forgeries, the lack of dates, signatures or classification stamps on a purportedly top-secret governmental document, how the bombshell accusation against Iran is based on the suspicious juxtaposition of two seemingly unrelated memos and why “lie detector” tests continue to be used for security screenings in the US despite their flawed methodology.

MP3 here. (27:13)

George Maschke works as a Persian linguist and legal translator for the Iran-US Claims Tribunal at the Hague. He is co-founder of the website Antipolygraph.org.