Scott Horton Interviews Elaine Brower

Scott Horton, January 14, 2010

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Elaine Brower, military mom and member of the National Steering Committee of World Can’t Wait, discusses the popular reverence for the military that continues unabated, sanitized recruitment ads that give the impression military service is just paid job training, the debate over whether video game violence inspires real life violent acts and how military enlistment is portrayed as the only way to escape inner city poverty and unemployment.

MP3 here. (26:25)

Elaine Brower is a military mom, activist with Military Families Speak Out and Drive Out the Bush Regime and a member of the National Steering Committee of World Can’t Wait.

10 Responses to “Elaine Brower”

  1. The thing where Vietnam veterans were spit upon has been shown for a myth over and over again.

    Just another lie by the military to pressure the populace.

  2. I think movies have a much more profound influence on the people than games have, like Scott said, games are just played for fun and it can be whatever game, kids can play football games and not have any desire to join a football team. Same things with war games, kids can play them and not wanting to join the military.

    Movies however, are more likely to glorify and romanticize not only war but the US military, like Scott said,Transformers 2 was like one big commercial for Lockheed Martin, and if you check the credits where they list all the "special thanks to" you will find every major weapons manufacturer as well as every single branch of the US military.

    Hell, even on this show… When people refer to the Mogadishu battle they say "Black Hawk Down". That dispicable movie has become – even in anti war circles – the de facto historical account of what happened.

  3. As I have said many times before on this website, anyone who joins the U.S. military is NOT defending America, they are just enabling the foreign policy elite in Washington to maintain American hegemony.

  4. "When people refer to the Mogadishu battle they say "Black Hawk Down". That dispicable movie has become – even in anti war circles – the de facto historical account of what happened."

    Not quite. I think many of the speakers are referring to the book. It provides the true reasons (ie, indiscriminate US Arty strikes into the city) as to why the whole city was trying to kill the US Rangers. I think I even remember the author being rather unhappy with the film, because he had taken time to talk to all sides of the battle, only to have that info end up on the cutting room floor.

    As for gaming, one thing I've noticed is that lots of gaming sites on the web have a constant slathering of recruitment ads in the banner sections.

  5. "The thing where Vietnam veterans were spit upon has been shown for a myth over and over again"

    Although they clearly deserved to be.

  6. No one spat on me when I came home from the Tonkin Gulf, 1972. We flew into Whidbey Is. Naval Air Station, the families met us, and the worst thing I had to tolerate was a plastic cup of Olympia beer.

  7. I enlisted in the US Navy in 1971 because I wanted to go to college and the GI Bill seemed the only way. I had no other advice. My father and my high school just assumed that a farm boy like me would be another farmer. If I'd had better advice, I might have chosen differently. As for the war, it had been on TV all my life and I didn't realize what joining meant. No one told me anything useful, although our village was full of Korea vets, WW II vets, WW I vets.

  8. I have mixed feelings about being a Viet Nam vet. I admit I have blood on my hands, from repairing airplanes which dropped bombs on people. On the other hand, when I have to deal with some conservacrook chickenhawk, damning me as an evil liberal because I don't hate Muslims enough or kowtow to the religious right, I like to throw my service in their cowardly faces. Like the Roman general on trial for something, whose defense was simply to bare his torso and show his scars.

    Also witnessing the Marcos coup in the Phillipines, the Kitty Hawk Mutiny, the massive debauchery in Subic Bay when it was the playground of the 7th Fleet, were important parts of my political education. I might still be a conventional Republican otherwise!

  9. [...] Elaine Brower « Antiwar Radio with Scott Horton and Charles Goyette Share and [...]

  10. I'm Canadian and I certainly can't wait for the perfumed princes of the pentagon to recognize and correct their leadership inadequacies.

    As far as I've been able to fiqure out, from reading Clausewitz, the leadership inadequacies of the American government and military in Clausewitz's government/military/people trinity were responsible for losing Viet Nam. Blaming the American people is just casting the blame where it doesn't belong.

    Now decades latter those same political and military leadership inadequacies are coming home to roost. in an absurdist comedy of Leviathan proportions.

Leave a Reply