Scott Horton Interviews John Feffer

Scott Horton, January 14, 2010

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John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, discusses the US influence in remaking the Japanese government after WWII, the enduring popularity of Japan’s Peace Constitution, the Pentagon’s recognition that US military bases eventually overstay their welcome even in allied countries, the continued symbolic significance of US gestures of regret for Hiroshima and Nagasaki and how Japanese foreign policy is influenced by antipathy toward N. Korea.

MP3 here. (25:04)

John Feffer is co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author of several books and numerous articles. He has been a Writing Fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC and a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University. He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia. He has taught a graduate level course on international conflict at Sungkonghoe University in Seoul in July 2001 and delivered lectures at a variety of academic institutions including New York University, Hofstra, Union College, Cornell University, and Sofia University (Tokyo).

John has been widely interviewed in print and on radio. He serves on the advisory committees of the Alliance of Scholars Concerned about Korea. He is a recipient of the Herbert W. Scoville fellowship and has been a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation. He currently lives with his partner Karin Lee in Hyattsville, Maryland.

5 Responses to “John Feffer”

  1. The USA should end its one-sided "alliance" with Japan. Bring the troops home, demobilize them and save some money.

  2. Quite a good overview, but the following articles touch on a less transparent factor affecting US-Japan relations, which tie it to the conflict in the Middle East.

    http://dissidentvoice.org/2009/05/japan%e2%80%99s

  3. Continued…

    http://dissidentvoice.org/2009/09/the-crisis-prov

  4. And finally…

    http://dissidentvoice.org/2009/12/a-wolfowitz-in-

  5. No Blood for oil , I dont think United States gets much oil from the mid East , Iraq ,Iran or even Saudi Arabia . Dont you remember Bush was trying to save the oil for the Iraqi people . United states gets their oil from home , canada ,mexicoe and our good pal Venzuaiia . I think american oil companies maybe get the oil and sell it from the mid east . If I'am right than we are fighting to protect the american oil cos profits , not our oil that we need . Cheves says now venzeualia gets 85 % of the money for their oil and the oil companies get 15 % . It used to be the other way around . He likes it better this way . I certianly don't care , but this maybe why he is hated

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