George Maschke

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_02_24_maschke.mp3]

George Maschke, co-founder of Antipolygraph.org, discusses the polygraph examination that Bruce Ivins passed before he was the FBI’s prime suspect in the 2001 anthrax mailings, historical failures in detecting national security threats through “lie-detector” tests and the retrospective claims by the FBI and DOJ that Ivins used countermeasures (that are now supposedly detectable) to mislead his polygraph examiner.

MP3 here. (16:28)

George Maschke works as a Persian linguist and legal translator for the Iran-US Claims Tribunal at the Hague. He is co-founder of the website Antipolygraph.org.

5 thoughts on “George Maschke”

  1. The missiles to be deployed on ships in the Black Sea in Bulgaria and on land in Romania and Poland by 2015 are a necessary component for an unanswerable first strike – – to shoot down surviving Russian missiles which are launched in retaliation according to former Trident missile engineer Bob Aldridge-http://www.plrc.org-. An unanswerable first-strike capability leads to Launch On Warning.

  2. Hey Scott,

    Great Show, but what that guy Maschke failed to mention is the National Academy of Sciences so called "Finding" was not a peer review study at all. They as a class of scientists are themselves subject to polygraph screening, and so could not be considered an unbiased body at all. In fact, Maschke himself even reports on his website that Al Queda knows how to beat the test, but in reality he is in that equation as having supplied to them that information himself, and perhaps also in his capability to translate it all to Persian or Arabic. Some have called this treason in time of war.

  3. Now the only evidence against Bruce Edwards Ivins was not just the polygraph test. Not only was he a very rabid christian zionist but he had serious mental issues. The fact that he took his own life when he was tipped off that the FBI was on to him says a lot too.

    Now was he the sole culprit? Who knows? But his anthrax letters sure served a political purpose.

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