Scott Horton Interviews Hannah Gurman

Scott Horton, August 27, 2010

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Hannah Gurman, author of the Salon.com article “The Iraq withdrawal: An Orwellian success,” discusses the U.S. deliberations on Iraq’s future that fail to ask what Iraqis want, measuring the outcome of war in terms of “success” rather than victory or defeat, how Iraq’s inability to form a parliament is delaying the approval of lucrative oil contracts and why the Sons of Iraq who were never integrated into the army are returning to the insurgency.

MP3 here. (23:21)

Hannah Gurman is an assistant professor at NYU’s Gallatin School. She is currently working on a book about the history of counterinsurgency in American foreign policy.

4 Responses to “Hannah Gurman”

  1. With a "mission" that's as substantive as a fart in the wind it comes as no surprise.

  2. Amazing. We voted for Obama but what we got instead was a combination of Hilary Clinton and G.W. Bush. We voted for peace but what we got was the same National Security/Pentagon war state. We voted for a new, more reasonable image of America abroad and what we got was 'American ignorance on parade' . We thought we would get 'Democracy Now' but we got more Fox News', targeted assassinations, torture, private corporations in charge of national security and intelligence, spying and killing for profit. They wouldn't even let Helen Thomas retire with dignity after 50 years of conscience and courage. They sent a Mossad agent to entrap her and humiliate her before the world and throw her out like garbage.

  3. There was a reporter who once asked W about what the Iraqis thought about the whole U.S. invasion (or words to that effect), and W answered: they should be grateful to us. NOW, no reporter would even have the nerve to ask such an embarrassing question.

  4. Best sentence I've read on this subject: You can change a regime; you can't change a society.

    Even if Bremmer had known who Muqtada al Sadr was, he still couldn't have known enough to make the invasion a 'success,' even from the U.S. POV.

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