The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_27_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the huge growth in the Department of Justice since its inception and its current questionable role as a legal defender of government crimes, the double standard where – for domestic propaganda purposes – the government can talk about hit-lists for U.S. citizens but when the practice is challenged in court the topic becomes a state secret, the end of any logical limits on executive power and the suicide of DOJ prosecutor Nicholas Marsh just before the scheduled release of a report on his alleged misconduct.

MP3 here. (20:36)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Jess Sundin

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_27_sundin.mp3]

Jess Sundin, member of the Anti-War Committee and an FBI raid target, discusses the FBI’s raid of her home that included the confiscation of personal items and the serving of a grand jury subpoena, the notoriously broad “material support” for terrorism statute that was used to justify the search warrant and the nationwide solidarity protests in support of the raid victims and the First Amendment.

MP3 here. (8:38)

Jess Sundin is a longtime antiwar activist and member of the Anti-War Committee in Minnesota.

Dilip Hiro

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_24_hiro.mp3]

Dilip Hiro, author of After Empire: The Birth of a Multipolar World, discusses the terminal decline of the still-mighty U.S. empire, the frequent defeat of American strong-arm tactics in foreign affairs and the rise of competing powers in the BRIC countries.

MP3 here. (17:34)

Born in the Indian sub-continent, Dilip Hiro was educated in India, Britain and America, where he received a master’s degree at Virginia Polytechnic & State University. He then settled in London in the mid-1960s, and became a full-time writer, journalist and commentator. He has published many books, the latest of which is After Empire: The Birth of a Multipolar World.

Jeremy Sapienza

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_22_sapienza.mp3]

Jeremy Sapienza, Senior Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the failed repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell” despite the best efforts of pop stars and the contradictory manner of antiwar leftists advocating for domestic gay rights without considering the consequences for international human rights.

MP3 here. (19:40)

Jeremy Sapienza is Assistant Webmaster and Senior Editor at Antiwar.com.

Karen Kwiatkowski

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_22_kwiatkowski.mp3]

Karen Kwiatkowski, columnist at lewrockwell.com and retired USAF lieutenant colonel, discusses the unauthorized hit squad of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan, why those who complain about “tying the hands” of the military are really asking for a free pass to murder civilians, how the high military suicide rate indicates government-approval for killing doesn’t lessen individual guilt caused by immoral actions and why an economic embargo against Washington is long overdue.

MP3 here. (19:10)

Karen Kwiatkowski, Ph.D., is a retired USAF Lieutenant Colonel, who spent her final years in uniform working at the Pentagon’s Near East/South Asia bureau (NESA). Her assignment was to work on policy papers for the Secretary of Defense and other top brass at the Pentagon. Shortly thereafter, she was assigned to a newly-formed bureau inside the Pentagon called the Office of Special Plans, which was created to help the Pentagon deal with issues in Iraq.

Deeply frustrated and alarmed, Kwiatkowski, still on active duty, took the unusual step of penning an anonymous column of internal Pentagon dissent that was posted on the Internet by former Colonel David Hackworth, America’s most decorated veteran. She lives with her freedom-loving family in the Shenandoah Valley, and among other things, writes for lewrockwell.com.

Christina Tobin

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_22_tobin.mp3]

Christina Tobin, Founder and Chair of The Free and Equal Elections Foundation, discusses the U.S. agreement with Costa Rica that allows 7,000 Marines to expand the War on Drugs in Central America, U.S. economic pressures that are forcing Costa Ricans to get on board with big agribusiness and abandon any ideas about marijuana legalization and how reformed election laws will help put and end to the two party duopoly in the U.S.

MP3 here. (10:39)

Christina is Founder and Chair of The Free and Equal Elections Foundation, a nonpartisan, nonprofit, public-policy and advocacy organization dedicated to protecting the rights of the politically marginalized and disenfranchised, particularly those of third party and Independent voters and candidates. She is also CEO of Free and Equal, Inc., a ballot access consulting and petitioning firm.

Christina is a 2010 candidate for Secretary of State in California.

Ali Gharib

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_24_gharib.mp3]

Ali Gharib, New York-based journalist on U.S. foreign policy and LobeLog writer, discusses the FBI raids on antiwar activists’ homes, how Israel put Iran in “Axis of Evil” after 9/11, the Global War on Terror’s conflation of national resistance groups (and any enemy of Israel) with international terrorist groups like al-Qaeda, neoconservative warmongers re-using the Iraq War playbook to gin up support for an attack on Iran, the tangled neocon web of familial relationships and the new cottage industry of neophyte Koran “scholars” quoting passages out of context to portray Islam as a religion bent on world domination.

MP3 here. (46:57)

Ali Gharib is a New York-based journalist on U.S. foreign policy with a focus on the Middle East and Central Asia. His work has appeared at Inter Press Service, where he was the Deputy Washington Bureau Chief; the Buffalo Beast; Huffington Post; Mondoweiss; Right Web; and Alternet. He holds a Master’s degree in Philosophy and Public Policy from the London School of Economics and Political Science. A proud Iranian-American and fluent Farsi speaker, Ali was born in California and raised in D.C.

Jeff Paterson

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_23_paterson.mp3]

Jeff Paterson, Project Director of Courage to Resist, discusses the work being done by the Bradley Manning Support Network, Ehren Watada‘s successful war refusal based on the Iraq War’s illegality (and the Pentagon’s fear of bad press), pending Canadian legislation that would force the government to accept American Iraq War resisters and how the Pentagon repeatedly deploys soldiers who are physically or mentally damaged and unfit to fight.

MP3 here. (20:31)

Jeff Paterson is Project Director of Courage to Resist.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_23_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses Gen. Petraeus’s decision to double down in Afghanistan rather than deescalate and blame the quagmire on his predecessors, evidence of a civilian-military rift on war decisions with Obama failing to control policy and his generals near open rebellion, how the media love fest over Gen. Petraeus gives him unprecedented influence in the political process and why – for the sake of the republic – the permanent U.S. war footing must end soon.

MP3 here. (32:42)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com

Matthew Hoh

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_21_hoh.mp3]

Matthew Hoh, Director of the Afghanistan Study Group, discusses the circumstances that promted his resignation as a U.S. Foreign Service Officer in Afghanistan, the changing establishment consensus that is increasingly at odds with Afghanistan policy and the fact that – despite the hype about Gen. Petraeus’s strategy refresh – COIN doctrine has been in effect since 2005.

MP3 here. (18:55)

Matthew Hoh is the Director of the Afghanistan Study Group, a collection of foreign and public policy experts and professionals advocating for a change in US strategy in Afghanistan. Matthew has served with the US Marine Corps in Iraq and on US Embassy teams in both Afghanistan and Iraq. He resides in Arlington, VA.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_21_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses the farcical Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, the failure of U.S. courts to check rampant government criminality, the “battered citizen syndrome” that leaves Americans too scared of external threats to protest their lost liberties and why 2012 may be the last chance to elect Ron Paul and stop our national suicide.

MP3 here. (23:00)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

Paul Kawika Martin

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_22_kawika.mp3]

Paul Kawika Martin, Organizing and Policy Director at Peace Action, discusses how the U.S.-Russia START Treaty is stuck in expiration limbo as midterm election political wrangling pushes back a Senate vote, the importance of calling your senators and telling them to get the ball rolling on a new nuclear arms treaty, Republican delaying tactics that seek to deny the embattled Obama administration a legislative success and why Obama’s encouraging pledge to forgo nuclear annihilation threats against non-nuclear armed countries unfortunately makes an exception for Iran.

MP3 here. (20:25)

Paul Kawika Martin is the Organizing and Policy Director at Peace Action.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_21_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the election in Afghanistan: the unofficial ballot box stuffing contest, the lively market in buying and selling voter cards and the very low turnout (especially after correcting for fraud).

MP3 here. (10:54)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_21_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses his 8-part exposé on the 176 remaining prisoners in Guantanamo, the nearly 600 inmates already released that put the lie to “worst of the worst” claims, Obama’s political decision not to release Yemeni prisoners no matter their innocence, Taliban foot soldiers fighting the Northern Alliance pre-9/11 unfairly lumped together with actual terrorism suspects and how the Abu Zubaydah case proves that evidence obtained through torture cannot be relied upon.

MP3 here. (25:06)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. His documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo is available on DVD.

Elaine Cassel

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_21_cassel.mp3]

Elaine Cassel, civil liberties attorney and author of The War on Civil Liberties: How Bush and Ashcroft have Dismantled the Bill of Rights, discusses the 9th Circuit Court’s decision – based on state secrets privilege – that denies Binyam Mohamed due process for his rendition and torture by the CIA and proxy groups, the legal immunity enjoyed by judges and prosecutors from gross misconduct (other than taking bribes), why a court ruling against NSA warrantless wiretapping isn’t enough to stop a determined Executive Branch and how the Republican Party’s spellbound descent into conspiratorial nonsense continues unabated.

MP3 here. (30:14)

Elaine Cassel is a  civil liberties attorney and author of The War on Civil Liberties: How Bush and Ashcroft have dismantled the Bill of Rights.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_20_kpfk_margolis.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles radio broadcast of September 20. The entire show (1 hour segment) can be heard here.

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses how the Afghan election failed to confer any legitimacy to the government and was a total waste of time and money, why the Afghan Army’s minimal Pashtun representation bodes ill for future security and cohesion, the incredible hubris of the “government in a box” strategy for pacifying Marja, the stealthy U.S. occupation of Pakistan and how the increased violence in Kashmir complicates U.S. regional strategy.

MP3 here. (19:57)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Jeremy Varon

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_13_varon.mp3]

Jeremy Varon, member of Witness Against Torture, discusses why Obama isn’t an improvement over Bush on torture and the rule of law, the Department of Justice’s active role in denying due process to torture victims, the Appeals Court decision that gives immunity to government crimes under cover of state secrets and how the Left’s inability to impeach Obama leaves the electoral process as the only means to remove him from office.

MP3 here. (19:12)

Jeremy Varon is a member of Witness Against Torture.

Jon Basil Utley

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_13_utley.mp3]

Jon Basil Utley, director of Americans Against World Empire, discusses how the U.S. export-grade democracy (proportional representation) differs from domestic democracy (direct elections) and the dysfunctional foundations of Iraq’s government that may have been intentionally crippled to guarantee a permanent U.S. occupation.

MP3 here. (9:35)

Jon Basil Utley is associate publisher of The American Conservative. He was a foreign correspondent in South America for the Journal of Commerce and Knight Ridder newspapers and former associate editor of The Times of the Americas. He is a writer and adviser for Antiwar.com and edits a blog, The Military Industrial Congressional Complex. Jon also runs the IraqWar.org and TheWarParty.com websites.

Kevin Zeese

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_13_zeese.mp3]

Kevin Zeese, Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace, discusses the failed left-of-center antiwar movement, how a broad-based antiwar coalition can keep the pressure on during the ebb and flow of Democrat-Republican politics, the remarkable Martin Luther King, Jr. Riverside church speech and why current trends indicate that we face a lifetime of constant war.

MP3 here. (21:18)

Kevin Zeese  is the Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace.He also served as the Executive Director of Democracy Rising, is an attorney, and a long term peace advocate. He took a leave from VotersForPeace for most of 2006 while he was running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland. Zeese was a founding member of the Montgomery County Coalition Against the War in Maryland and has worked with various non-profit organizations on peace, justice, and democracy issues since 1978.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_13_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses Radio Free Europe’s strange accusation that Ditz is an Iranian agent and the taxpayer dollars wasted on a Cold War propaganda relic reinvented as U.S.  government “journalism.”

MP3 here. (9:31)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Nick Turse

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_10_turse.mp3]

Nick Turse, author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives, discusses how today’s military-industrial complex far exceeds the one Eisenhower warned of, the Pentagon’s influence in Hollywood that often includes vetting rights on movie scripts in exchange for access to taxpayer funded weapons of war, the early-and-often bombardment of young people with military propaganda, why far too many businesses and workers are reliant on Pentagon spending and the five jaw-dropping and under-reported WikiLeaks stories.

MP3 here. (25:49)

Nick Turse is an award-winning journalist, historian, essayist, and the associate editor of the Nation Institute’s Tomdispatch.com.  He is the author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_10_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses Joe Biden’s acceptance of the mainstream (and false) Iraq War narrative, how the U.S. and Iran are essentially partners-in-meddling in Iraqi politics, dispelling the main tenets of surge “success” and why Iraq is shaping up to be another “forgotten war” in the Korean model.

MP3 here. (27:08)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com

Juan Cole

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_10_cole.mp3]

Juan Cole, Professor of History and author of Engaging the Muslim World, discusses the medieval-yet-reasonable Islamic laws of war, how Osama bin Laden and the 9/11 hijackers more closely resemble radical nationalists than Islamic extremists, why many Americans continue to get the facts of 9/11 completely wrong and how “Islamofascism” fears were ginned up in Republican National Committee focus groups to get votes in the 2006 midterm elections.

MP3 here. (22:48)

Juan Cole is the author of Engaging the Muslim World. He is a Professor of History at the University of Michigan and writes the “Informed Comment” blog at Juancole.com.

Muhammad Sahimi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_09_sahimi.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the September 9 KPFK Los Angeles radio broadcast. The entire show can be heard here.

Muhammad Sahimi, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Southern California, discusses new accusations – from the NCRI (or MEK) terrorist group – that Iran is building secret nuclear enrichment facilities near Tehran, the moderate interpretation of the accusations from the usually-alarmist Institute for Science and International Security, current claims of obstructionism that ignore Iran’s legal rights under their safeguards agreement and the limitations of IAEA authority, how numerous debunking attempts have failed to kill the “smoking laptop” narrative, how Iran’s crisis of theocracy (the government’s challenge to the ayatollah’s monopoly on religious authority) is misinterpreted by the West as an aspiring global Islamic Caliphate and why a clear understanding of modified Code 3.1 (of the Subsidiary Arrangements of the Safeguards Agreement) perfectly refutes the Qom facility “gotcha” stunt.

MP3 here. (54:10)

Dr. Muhammad Sahimi is a political columnist for Tehran Bureau. He is a professor of chemical engineering and materials science, and the NIOC Chair in petroleum engineering at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. In addition to his scientific research, which has resulted in four books and nearly 300 published papers, he has been writing about Iran’s nuclear program and its internal developments for many years.

His articles have appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Wall Street Journal, Harvard International Review, the Progressive, Antiwar.com and Huffington Post. Muhammad has been a member of the Union of Concerned Scientists since 1986, and a contributor to its Partners for Earth program.

Jeremy Sapienza

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_08_sapienza.mp3]

Jeremy Sapienza, Senior Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the doublethink required to reconcile the “Iraq War is over” pronouncement with the 50,000 remaining troops, winning the fight against Wikipedia’s Iraq War entry (and why this reversal further proves the print media business model is dead) and U.S. interference in Somalia before and after the “Black Hawk Down” disaster.

MP3 here. (19:20)

Jeremy Sapienza is Assistant Webmaster and Senior Editor at Antiwar.com.

Matthew Harwood

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_08_harwood.mp3]

Washington DC-based writer Matthew Harwood discusses the RAND Corporation’s study – commissioned by the Army War College – that recommends a hybrid “Stability Police Force” to supplement U.S. military actions abroad, the placement of non-deployed SPF “police” in the U.S. Marshal’s Service to avoid conflicts with the Posse Comitatus Act, the blurred line between rules of engagement for the military and civilian police and how the addition of yet another tool for foreign intervention effectively lowers the barrier to conflict entry.

MP3 here. (28:14)

Matthew Harwood is a writer in Washington DC. His work has appeared in The Guardian (UK), The Washington Monthly, Truth-out.org, The Huffington Post, The Columbia Journalism Review and elsewhere. He is currently working on a book about evangelical Christian rhetoric and aggressive US foreign policy.

Winslow T. Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_07_wheeler.mp3]

Winslow T. Wheeler, Director of the Straus Military Reform Project, discusses the Pentagon’s trillion dollar budget, rapidly increasing costs that have delayed much-needed repairs/replacements of aging military equipment, the post-9/11 rejuvenation of incompetent Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and how construction of new Virginia-class submarines is spread out in the interest of inefficiency and Congressional pork.

MP3 here. (20:23)

Winslow T. Wheeler writes regularly for Counterpunch.org. He spent 31 years working on Capitol Hill with senators from both political parties and the Government Accountability Office, specializing in national security affairs. Currently, he directs the Straus Military Reform Project of the Center for Defense Information in Washington. He is author of Wastrels of Defense: How Congress Sabotages U.S. Security and the editor of a new anthology: America’s Defense Meltdown: Pentagon Reform for President Obama and the New Congress.

Michael German

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_07_german.mp3]

Michael German, Policy Counsel for the ACLU’s Washington Legislative Office and former FBI Special Agent, discusses FBI management’s rigorous attention to public relations and persecution of internal whistleblowers, broad 9/11 intelligence failures across all agencies, the unnecessary division of FBI functions into a semi-transparent and accountable criminal justice half and a completely unaccountable intelligence half, the high conviction rate of terrorism prosecutions in federal courts and the FBI’s continuing work on ethnic maps in the U.S.

MP3 here. (28:39)

Michael German is a Policy Counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington Legislative Office. Prior to joining the ACLU German served sixteen-years as a Special Agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, where he specialized in domestic terrorism and covert operations.

German currently serves as an adjunct professor for Law Enforcement and Terrorism at the National Defense University and is a Senior Fellow with GlobalSecurity.org. German is the author of Thinking Like a Terrorist, which was published in January 2007. German has a B.A. in Philosophy from Wake Forest University and a J.D. from Northwestern University Law School.

Michael O’Brien

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_06_obrien.mp3]

Michael O’Brien, author of America’s Failure in Iraq, discusses the media’s focus on troop escalations while ignoring the larger private contractor surges, the ease of starting wars and keeping them going since Congress abdicated its Constitutional responsibility, the inexcusable failures of the Coalition Provisional Authority and Paul Bremer, the primary purposes of contractors in Iraq: generate billable hours and stay alive, the critical questions not asked in the Fox News poll about U.S. opinion on the Iraq War, how Gen. Petraeus got promoted twice after losing 190,000 weapons meant for Iraqi security forces and why the surge’s success (even supposing it worked) in 2007 doesn’t retroactively justify the 2003 invasion.

MP3 here. (44:03)

Michael O’Brien spent 14 months as a DoD (Department of Defense) contractor in Iraq. He was the Real Estate Adviser to the Iraqi Ministry of Defense. Mike had previously spent over 20 years in commercial real estate, most of that time working in various areas of US Government real estate and facilities, to include nearly a decade with the US General Services Administration (GSA). Mike was assigned to the Ministry of Defense Transition Team (MODTT), part of the Multi-National Security Transition Command-Iraq, or MNSTC-I. This was the Coalition command element responsible for ‘standing up’ the Iraqi Ministries of Defense and Interior after they had been disbanded by Paul Bremer, the former head of the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA).

Mike O’Brien was on the Bush-Cheney 2000 Campaign in its national headquarters in Austin, Texas, and participated in the vote recounts in Florida. He was a political appointee in the administration of President George W. Bush, serving in the US State Department’s Overseas Buildings Operations Bureau, where he was responsible for the planning and development of US embassies and consulates around the world. He was in Dacca, Bangladesh, on September 11, 2001. After 9/11, Mike went to the White House as the Senior Director for Administration in the Office of Homeland Security, the predecessor to the Department of Homeland Security we have today. Mr. O’Brien was one of the first 50 staff to arrive there.

Michael O’Brien is a graduate of West Point and served in the Infantry in Fort Benning, Georgia; the Canal Zone, Republic of Panama; the Demilitarized Zone, Republic of South Korea and Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas.  He is a graduate of the US Army Ranger and Airborne schools at Fort Benning, Georgia, and is a former commercial helicopter pilot. He lives in Arlington, Virginia.

Kathy Kelly

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_06_kelly.mp3]

Kathy Kelly, co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence (a campaign to end U.S. military and economic warfare), discusses the “Creech 14” activists awaiting trial for protesting U.S. military drone strikes in AfPak, the obligation of citizens to speak out against government breeches of international law and why targeted assassinations create more security problems than they solve.

MP3 here. (9:58)

Kathy Kelly currently helps coordinate the Voices for Creative Nonviolence campaign. She helped initiate Voices in the Wilderness, a campaign to end the UN/US sanctions against Iraq. For bringing medicine to Iraq in open violation of the UN/US sanctions, she and other campaign members were notified of a proposed $163,000 penalty for the organization, threatened with 12 years in prison, and eventually fined $20,000, a sum which they’ve refused to pay.

Kelly helped organize and participated in nonviolent direct action teams in Haiti (summer of 1994), Bosnia (August, 1993, December, 1992) and Iraq (Gulf Peace Team, 1991). In April of 2002, she was among the first internationals to visit the Jenin camp, where conventional military forces of the Israeli Defense Force had destroyed over 100 civilian homes, in the Occupied West Bank.

In 1988, she was sentenced to one year in prison for planting corn on nuclear missile silo sites. Kelly served nine months of the sentence in Lexington KY maximum security prison. In the spring of 2004, she served three months at Pekin federal prison for crossing the line as part of an ongoing “School of the Americas Watch” effort to close an army military combat training school at Fort Benning, GA.

Kelly is active with the Catholic Worker movement and, as a pacifist and war tax refuser, has refused payment of all Federal income tax since 1980.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_03_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses the appalling lack of knowledge displayed by the U.S. occupation forces in Afghanistan, how Americans are too uneducated and impatient to rival the British Empire’s colonial skills, the problem with exporting democracy to Muslim countries whose people are more concerned with justice, economic advisers hard at work making Afghanistan’s banks as insolvent as America’s and how U.S.-engineered term extensions for key Pakistani military posts have effectively deposed the civilian government.

MP3 here. (20:24)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_03_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses spreading American ideas through education instead of with bombs, democratic growing pains (or death throes) in the Kyrgyz Republic, how the wide ideological divisions in the Cold War have since converged in a mash-up of state capitalism and authoritarianism, the strident nationalism of Vladimir Putin and Dick Cheney and why a one-world government is not a realistic possibility.

MP3 here. (41:53)

The Other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Josh Ruebner

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_03_ruebner.mp3]

Josh Ruebner, National Advocacy Director of the US Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation, discusses burning his Israeli military deferment papers in protest, reasons to be skeptical of the newest attempt at Israel-Palestinian peace talks, the unfair foundation for negotiations that requires equal concessions from drastically unequal partners, why the U.S. never uses its substantial leverage to influence Israel’s policy and how the 500,000 West Bank settlers may have established enough “facts on the ground” to make a 2-state solution impossible.

MP3 here. (18:54)

Josh Ruebner is the National Advocacy Director of the US Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation, a national coalition of more than 325 organizations working to change U.S. policy towards Israel/Palestine to support human rights, international law, and equality. He also co-founded an organization named Jews for Peace in Palestine and Israel (JPPI), which later merged with Jewish Voice for Peace.

Josh used to work as a Middle East Analyst with Congressional Research Service (CRS), a non-partisan federal government agency which conducts research for Members of Congress. He is an active member of the Arlington Green Party and ran twice as its candidate for Arlington County Board.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_03_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses the consequence of successfully resisting law enforcement: escalation of state violence until you are destroyed, cop priorities that place self preservation far ahead of “protect and serve,” the double standards of when a taser gun is considered a deadly weapon and why it is no longer a source of pride for a cop never to have drawn his firearm.

MP3 here. (20:42)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate, hosts the Pro Libertate Radio show on the Liberty News Radio Network and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Michael Scheuer

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_02_scheuer.mp3]

Michael Scheuer, 22-year veteran of the CIA and former head analyst at the CIA’s bin Laden unit, discusses the mostly-unknown motivation for 9/11: bin Laden’s 1996 fatwa, the U.S. media’s Israel bias that prevents them from explaining the link between terrorism and foreign policy, the 14 missed chances to kill bin Laden from 1998 to 2001 including the Tora Bora escape, why Gen. Petaeus’s political ambition and Obama’s face-saving guarantee that the failed Afghan War will muddle on, Pakistan’s anger about India’s role in rebuilding Afghanistan, the history of failed civilian governments in Pakistan, the centrally connected operations of al Qaeda offshoots, the U.S. folly of pitting Christian Ethiopia against Islamic Somalia to effect regime change, how terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi could have been killed before the 2003 Iraq invasion instead of in 2006 and why U.S. energy dependence means paying for gasoline with the blood of soldiers.

MP3 here. (40:02)

Michael Scheuer is a 22-year veteran of the CIA and former head analyst at the CIA’s bin Laden unit. He is the author of Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq and Imperial Hubris: Why the West is Losing the War on Terror.

Scheuer has a website and writes for The Diplomat and Antiwar.com. His upcoming book Osama Bin Laden is available for pre-order.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_02_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses his article “The Persistence of Red-State Fascism” that recalls Lew Rockwell’s 2004 groundbreaking original, how 9/11 removed the last vestiges of libertarian anti-statism from the Republican Party, why the Left should be as obsessive about the entire Bill of Rights as conservatives are about the 2nd Amendment and how war is the state power most diametrically opposed to libertarianism.

MP3 here. (18:32)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Patrick Cockburn, Michael Hastings and Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_02_kpfk_cockburn_hastings_worthington.mp3]

These interviews are excerpted from the KPFK broadcast of September 2nd. The entire show can be heard here.

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent, discusses the embarrassing performance of what was supposed to be an impressive display of U.S. military power in Iraq, the bitter sectarian divide remaining from Iraq’s civil war of 2006-07 and why Kurdish autonomy my be preferable to true independence in the short term.

Michael Hastings (audio begins at 19:30), author of the article “The Runaway General” in Rolling Stone magazine, where he is now a contributing editor, discusses why the AfPak War – unfortunately – lives up to its name, the large increase in drone strikes during Obama’s presidency, the elusive “inflection point” at which combat casualties permanently decline and why the “surge” in Iraq can’t be duplicated in Afghanistan.

Andy Worthington (audio begins at 35:45), author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the proceedings at Guantanamo that are grinding to a halt, why “material support for terrorism” charges have no relation to war crimes and should be tried in federal courts, the political realities that make Guantanamo’s timely closure highly unlikely and the 58 Yemeni prisoners still in custody despite being cleared for release.

MP3 here. (54:12)

Patrick Cockburn was awarded the 2009 Orwell Prize for political writing in British journalism. He is the Middle East correspondent for The Independent and a frequent contributor to CounterPunch.org. Cockburn is the author of The Occupation: War, Resistance and Daily Life in Iraq and Muqtada Al-Sadr and the Battle for the Future of Iraq.

Michael Hastings is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine and the author of I Lost My Love in Baghdad: A Modern War Story. In 2008, he covered the U.S. presidential elections for Newsweek, and before that he was the magazine’s Baghdad correspondent. His articles have appeared in GQ, Slate, Salon, Foreign Policy, the Washington Post, LA Times, and other publications. His blog The Hastings Report focuses on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and other foreign policy topics.

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and blogs at AndyWorthington.co.uk. His documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo is available on DVD.

Aaron Glantz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_01_glantz.mp3]

Aaron Glantz, author of The War Comes Home: Washington’s Battle against America’s Veterans, discusses the U.S. media’s eager participation in selling the Iraq War and hyping Colin Powell’s infamous U.N. presentation, how Obama made good on troop reductions but is too quick to claim credit for the war’s end, increased funding for the VA that has improved care somewhat, the betrayal of soldiers who have killed and died for a war based on lies and how service dogs are used to reduce the epidemic of suicides among veterans.

MP3 here. (20:13)

Aaron Glantz is an independent journalist who specializes on the impact of war on those who have experienced it directly: soldiers and civilians, aid workers and journalists. Aaron reported extensively from inside Iraq from 2003 to 2005 and has been covering veterans’ issues since his return to the United States.

Aaron’s work has appeared in The Nation, The Progressive, San Francisco Chronicle, The American Prospect, Forbes, Inter Press Service, Alternet and on Democracy Now! and Yahoo! News.  He is a Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Fellow at the Carter Center and a  Fellow at the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media at Columbia University Teachers College.

In addition to The War Comes Home, he is author of the San Francisco Chronicle best-seller, How America Lost Iraq, and co-author of Winter Soldier Iraq and Afghanistan.

Jason Ditz and Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_01_ditz_vlahos.mp3]

Antiwar.com’s Jason Ditz and Kelley B. Vlahos discuss Obama’s substitution of meaningless buzzwords for unpleasant truths in his “Operation Iraqi Freedom is over” speech, the media’s fixation on Iraq’s “cell phone index” to measure progress while ignoring water and electricity shortages, why nobody bothers to mention that Iraqi politics are dominated by Shia fundamentalists and how the Iraqi Army State Department will step up as the Pentagon stands down.

MP3 here. (20:13)

Jason Ditz is managing news editor of Antiwar.com.

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos, a Washington, D.C.-based freelance writer, is a longtime political reporter for FoxNews.com, a contributing editor at The American Conservative magazine and featured Antiwar.com columnist. She is also a Washington correspondent for Homeland Security Today magazine.

Mike Gogulski

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_01_gogulski.mp3]

Mike Gogulski, founder of the Bradley Manning Support Network, discusses the successful legal-defense fundraising effort that has landed attorney David Coombs, substantial monetary pledges from Michael Moore and WikiLeaks and the establishment of a mail delivery agreement with the Quantico brig so Manning can read the letters from his many supporters.

MP3 here. (9:39)

Mike Gogulski is the founder and a frequent contributor to the BradleyManning.org website.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_31_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses how central banks print fiat money to pay for world wars that would otherwise be impossible to finance, the enormous resources at the U.S. government’s disposal to delay an economic reckoning, why WalMart is a net gain to society, the division between those who live off the state and those who support it (albeit unwillingly) and why more super-rich dynastic families are needed to compete for power with the state.

MP3 here. (43:20)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Robert Naiman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_31_naiman.mp3]

Robert Naiman, Policy Director at Just Foreign Policy, discusses Obama’s commendable follow-through on reducing troop levels in Iraq and (at least rhetorically) standing by the 2011 withdrawal date, the huge increase in troop numbers and casualties in Afghanistan since the Bush administration, the end of finite wars as U.S. foreign policy remains on a permanent war footing and the much-exaggerated death of the antiwar movement.

MP3 here. (18:37)

Robert Naiman is Policy Director at Just Foreign Policy. Mr. Naiman edits the Just Foreign Policy daily news summary and writes on U.S. foreign policy at Huffington Post. He is president of the board of Truthout. Naiman has worked as a policy analyst and researcher at the Center for Economic and Policy Research and Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. He has masters degrees in economics and mathematics from the University of Illinois and has studied and worked in the Middle East.

Haroon Siddiqui

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_31_siddiqui.mp3]

Haroon Siddiqui, editorial writer for the Toronto Star, discusses Canada’s military role in Afghanistan that is due to end in 2011, why ending foreign wars will stop domestic terrorism, how the U.S. has lost the capacity to do good, the bogus argument of “we’re fighting them over there so we don’t have to fight them here,” and why the Afghanistan War is a failure by any measure yet continues unabated.

MP3 here. (20:30)

Haroon Siddiqui is the author of Being Muslim. He has worked for Canadian newspapers in various positions since 1968 and currently writes editorials for the Toronto Star.

Max Blumenthal

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_31_blumenthal.mp3]

Max Blumenthal, author of Republican Gomorrah: Inside the Movement that Shattered the Party, discusses the religious justifications for killing non-Jews in the “King’s Torah” by Rabbi Yitzhak Shapira, the tenuous far-right political alliance that makes Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu hold his tongue on the eve of Palestinian peace talks (lest he have to negotiate land-for-peace), the inclusion of moderate secular Jews on the non-Jew hit list, the seeming triumph of rabbinical law over Israel’s common law and the fascist Judea-state aspirations of Avigdor Lieberman’s political affiliates.

MP3 here. (14:18)

Max Blumenthal is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author whose articles and video documentaries have appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Daily Beast, The Nation, The Huffington Post, Salon.com, Al Jazeera English and many other publications. He is a writing fellow for the Nation Institute. His book, Republican Gomorrah: Inside The Movement That Shattered The Party, is a New York Times and Los Angeles Times bestseller.