Jonathan Landay

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_29_landay.mp3]

Jonathan S. Landay, national security and intelligence correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers, discusses how Afghan peace talks primarily exist as fictional inventions of the Pentagon, the US divide-and-conquer strategy employed against insurgent groups that is supposed to marginalize hardliners, India’s concern that another Mumbai attack would create overwhelming political pressure for military action against Pakistan, how a US withdrawal would turn Afghanistan into “Somalia on steroids” and destabilize much of Central Asia, how the continued US presence and Afghan government corruption fuel the insurgency and make occupation unsustainable, an analysis of ethnic and political factions that shows the Taliban is not a natural political successor and the odd spectacle of Russian and US agents jointly participating in a drug raid on Afghan heroin producers.

MP3 here. (31:59)

Jonathan S. Landay, national security and intelligence correspondent, has written about foreign affairs and U.S. defense, intelligence and foreign policies for 15 years. From 1985-94, he covered South Asia and the Balkans for United Press International and then the Christian Science Monitor. He moved to Washington in December 1994 to cover defense and foreign affairs for the Christian Science Monitor and joined Knight Ridder in October 1999.

He speaks frequently on national security matters, particularly the Balkans. In 2005, he was part of a team that won a National Headliners Award for “How the Bush Administration Went to War in Iraq.” He also won a 2005 Award of Distinction from the Medill School of Journalism for “Iraqi exiles fed exaggerated tips to news media.”

James Gordon Meek

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_29_meek.mp3]

James Gordon Meek, investigative reporter for the New York Daily News, discusses the FBI sting of accused D.C. bomb plotter Farooque Ahmed, well-paid informants who have an incentive to recruit patsies with fantastical terrorism plots and the re-emerging “lone wolf” decentralized form of terrorism that has been endorsed by Al Qaeda.

MP3 here. (19:56)

James Gordon Meek is an award-winning investigative reporter in Washington, D.C. Since 2003, he has covered national news, politics and terrorism for the New York Daily News in its Washington bureau.

Meek reported on the 9/11 attacks from the Pentagon, and has since traveled to Afghanistan and embedded with U.S. special operations forces to write about the secret war against Al Qaeda. He covered the trials of 9/11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui and Lewis “Scooter” Libby, the White House aide convicted of perjury in the Valerie Plame/CIA leak case. Meek has broken countless stories about terrorist plots, including the July 2006 plan by Lebanese militants linked to Al Qaeda in Iraq to blow up tunnels in New York City and flood lower Manhattan. He first wrote about Osama Bin Laden during the Millennium scare, when he participated in the investigation of an Al Qaeda cell in California that recruited one of the plotters in Jordan and Bin Laden’s young American spokesman, Adam Yahiye Gadahn. Meek also has broken a series of stories about abuses of inmates at the U.S. terrorist prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Previously, Meek worked for United Press International, APBnews.com and the Los Angeles Daily Journal. As a freelancer, he has written about terrorism and true crime for Reader’s Digest, Stuff, Blender, Ladies Home Journal, National Journal, the New York Press and Law & Order magazine. He contributed reporting to CNN terrorism analyst Peter Bergen’s 2006 book, “The Osama Bin Laden I Know.” A decade ago, Meek was the first cyberjournalist accredited by Congress and the White House. He has been awarded recognition by Investigative Reporters & Editors Inc., the South Asian Journalists Association, the National Press Club and the International Union of Police Associations.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_29_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses Pentagon criticisms of WikiLeaks’ Iraq War logs for simultaneously endangering the troops and having so little new information as to be non-newsworthy, exposing the military’s assertion that “we don’t do body counts” as a total lie, differing U.S. reactions to the nearly identical torture practices of Saddam Hussein’s regime and post-occupation Shi’ite allies and why the New York Times – despite a 10 week advance preview of the WikiLeaks documents – decided to lead with thin evidence of Iranian support for Iraqi militias.

MP3 here. (17:22)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Jeremy Hammond

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_28_hammond.mp3]

Jeremy R. Hammond, founder and editor of Foreign Policy Journal, discusses newly disclosed documents that shed light on pre-9/11 negotiations between the Taliban and U.S. about handing over Osama bin Laden, the “warning fatigue” that lead to U.S. officials ignoring Taliban tip offs of an impending Al Qaeda attack, the competition between Unocal and Argentina’s Bridas for an Afghanistan pipeline contract, the disputed authenticity of video evidence of bin Laden claiming responsibility for 9/11, how Dick Cheney and his Office of Legal Council lackeys formulated the U.S. policy of declaring war on terrorism instead of pursuing police actions against criminals and why the 9/11 Commission Report is an interesting mix of incompetence and subterfuge.

MP3 here. (47:25)

Jeremy R. Hammond is an independent political analyst whose articles have been featured in numerous print and online publications around the world. He is the founder and editor of Foreign Policy Journal (www.foreignpolicyjournal.com), an online source for news, critical analysis, and opinion commentary on U.S. foreign policy. He was a recipient of the 2010 Project Censored Awards for Outstanding Investigative Journalism and is the author of The Rejection of Palestinian Self-Determination.

Update:

Jeremy Hammond writes:

I’d like to ask you a favor, to forward this email on to Scott for me, if you don’t mind. I’d like to thank him again for the opportunity. Also, Scott and I discussed the so-called bin Laden “Confession Video” on the show, and he mentioned a BBC special that attempts to debunk the claim this video was a fake. I was unaware of it at the time, but Scott piqued my curiosity, so I found it and watched. I have the following observations I’d like to share with him:

Their expert argues that it’s understandable people got “confused” about bin Laden’s appearance because the frame was “scrunched” to fit the subtitles. That is, that they squeezed the aspect ratio of the video to add the subs. Two observations about this: 1) the example of this “scrunching” shown is not from the original video. The BBC editors did this, by first stretching the frame, and then returning it to how it looked in the Pentagon’s release. 2) You can see from the original that the frame ratio was not changed to add subtitles. As would be expected, they simply blacked out the bottom part of the frame. I’ve taken screenshots I took from the BBC special and the original DOD release that show this I’d be happy to e-mail along upon request. Again, the only manipulation of the frame’s aspect ratio was done by the BBC editors. So this argument from the BBC’s “expert” for why it admittedly doesn’t look like bin Laden is demonstrably false. It’s odd he would make this claim, because one would presume he would actually have watched the entire video (even fast-forwarding through), in which case he certainly should have known better.

That said, I also discovered that this video was shown at the Moussaoui trial. That copy has subtitles on the right side, rather than at the bottom. The frame of this copy is indeed visibly “squished” narrow, making bin Laden look thinner. It is a much higher quality version than the one previously available to the public on the internet, and the man in this version does indeed look like bin Laden. From the trial version of the video, I’d have to withdraw my conclusion that this is a fake. It is easy to understand how people can see the original release and think it’s not the same person (myself included), but this is not because the screen was “scrunched” as the BBC’s expert argues. It seems to me to be simply a result of the extremely poor quality of the video originally released (poor resolution, low contrast, etc.), which affects the appearance of his facial features (e.g. causing the shadow under his nose to make his nose appear shorter, flatter, wider).

On the other hand, this difference in quality between the two is also puzzling. I can’t imagine what the DOD did to the original release to make it look so bad by comparison (even considering transfer from videotape to high-res digital, and then another transfer from high-res digital to low-res for release on the internet), and I have to assume the trial version has also been digitally enhanced from its original, such as by boosting the contrast, sharpness, color saturation, etc. There’s also a time/date stamp on the trial release version, which is a bit odd because we were told the original was on videotape and not digital format (and from the quality even of the trial version does certainly appear to have been recorded on VHS or other analog format), and analog videotape does not have an extra track to invisibly record/embed a date/time stamp, as digital video (closed captioning, for example, is actually recorded within the video track itself one “line 21”). To the best of my knowledge (and I’m no expert, but I do have a B.S. degree in Film and Video), this metadata shouldn’t exist, unless it was shot in some digital format, because we know from the original release this is not a simple time stamp appearing on the actual recording.. I don’t know how to explain this.

There are other oddities. The subtitles show bin Laden saying, “due to my experience in this field, I was thinking that the fire from the gas in the plane would melt the iron structure of the building and collapse the area where the plane hit and all the floors above it only. This is all that we had hoped for.” This is odd, because the Saudi bin Laden family owns a major construction company, and Osama himself holds degrees (plural) in civil engineering (according to his profile at the CFR website). He would certainly know that the structure was steel, not iron. But presuming that’s just a detail lost in translation, he would certainly know better than to think that the jet fuel would burn hot enough and long enough to melt – or even substantially soften and weaken — steel. For this not to be suspect, we have to presume (a) he meant “steel” not “iron”, (b) he meant “weaken” not “melt”, and (c) he meant the office fires started by ignition of the jet fuel and not the jet fuel itself would burn hot and long enough to cause structural weakening of the floor trusses. All this is possible, but that’s a lot of assumptions.

Being submitted as evidence in a court of law, I thought to look into the chain of custody for the tape. In doing so, I discovered what is perhaps the strangest discrepancy of all. No chain of custody documentation was apparently presented, because the defense stipulated that the videotape was authentic. But here’s the weird part. According to the DOD, this videotape was “obtained by U.S. forces in Jalalabad, Afghanistan in late November”, and it wasn’t released by DOD until December 13, as we all know. But according to the stipulation, it “is an authentic copy of a videotape of statements of Usama Bin Laden and Sulaiman Abu Ghaith that aired on the Al-Jazeera Satellite Channel in November 2001”. I don’t know how to explain that one. It seems to me an irreconcilable contradiction.

http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=3184

http://www.vaed.uscourts.gov/notablecases/moussaoui/exhibits/prosecution/AF00007DVD.html

http://www.vaed.uscourts.gov/notablecases/moussaoui/exhibits/prosecution/ST00001A.pdf

Seeing the trial version of this, I have to reconsider my previous conclusion it’s a fake based on the dissimilarity of his appearance in the original DOD release to known images of him. In the higher quality video, it does indeed appear to be him. But I’m still not totally convinced, as there are still some fishy things going on here that would seem to me to require an explanation.

Best Regards,
Jeremy

Cindy Corrie

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_28_corrie.mp3]

Cindy Corrie, President of the Rachel Corrie Foundation, discusses the civil lawsuit against the State of Israel and its Ministry of Defense for the unlawful killing of her daughter Rachel in 2003, the strange operating practices of Israel’s court system – including privacy screens for some witnesses and a casual disregard for perjury, the contradictory testimony of the bulldozer driver who caused Rachel’s death, assurances from U.S. officials in the State Department and Vice President’s Office that they really do care about justice for Rachel and flotilla-activist Furkan Dogan, the dismissal of Corrie et al. v. Caterpillar on the grounds that the lawsuit interfered with Executive Branch policymaking and how a strong and immediate U.S. response to Rachel’s killing could have made Israel think twice about starting the Gaza War and flotilla raid.

MP3 here. (33:12)

Cindy Corrie is President of the Rachel Corrie Foundation. Her daughter, Rachel Corrie, was 23 when she was killed in the Gaza Strip while trying to prevent Israel’s demolition of Palestinian homes.

Thomas Harrington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_28_harrington.mp3]

Thomas Harrington, Associate professor of Hispanic Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, discusses the history and ongoing changes of South American politics, waning US regional influence evidenced by the almost complete disappearance of puppet dictators, ethnic-European dominance of the social hierarchy, economic recovery in Argentina following the rejection of IMF dictates and how – despite high profile failures – there can be mutually beneficial free trade agreements.

MP3 here. (20:51)

Thomas Harrington is Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies at Trinity College in Hartford where he teaches courses on 20th and 21th Century Spanish Cultural History, Literature and Film. His areas of research expertise include modern Iberian nationalist movements, Contemporary Catalonia, and the history of migration between the peninsular “periphery” (Catalonia, Galicia, Portugal and the Basque Country) and the societies of the Caribbean and the Southern Cone. He has lived and worked in Madrid, Barcelona, Lisbon, Santiago de Compostela and Montevideo, Uruguay and speaks Spanish, Catalan, Galician and Portuguese. He is currently on leave and living in Uruguay.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_28_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses Yemen’s unique geography and history, increased US interest in Yemen following the discovery of oil there, how numerous government-opposition groups with disparate agendas get lumped together as Al Qaeda, why Saudi Arabia feels threatened by Yemen’s large population and militant groups and why the expanded US search for Al Qaeda in West Africa could eventually lead to the Central Asian “Stans” and points beyond.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Matthew Rothschild

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_27_rothschild.mp3]

Matthew Rothschild, editor of The Progressive magazine, discusses the Pentagon’s Northern Command that has assigned an Army combat team to secure the U.S. in apparent contravention of Posse Comitatus, the ease by which the Executive Branch could circumvent Constitutional restrictions on declaring martial law, Halliburton-built U.S. prison camps useful for rounding up “enemy combatants” and American citizens alike and how another 9-11 (or even a failed bank bailout) could spell the end of Constitutional government.

MP3 here. (18:12)

Matthew Rothschild is the editor of The Progressive magazine, which is one of the leading voices for peace and social justice in this country. Rothschild has appeared on Nightline, C-SPAN, The O’Reilly Factor, and NPR, and his newspaper commentaries have run in the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, the Miami Herald, and a host of other newspapers. Rothschild is the author of You Have No Rights: Stories of America in Our Repressive Age.

Robert Parry

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_27_parry.mp3]

Robert Parry, founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com, discusses the other factors besides the “surge” that led to decreased violence in post-2007 Iraq, why it’s still important to fight the conventional surge narrative that elevated Gen. Petraeus’s career and influenced strategy in Afghanistan and how the rigid neoconservative ideology of Bush administration policymakers significantly delayed a truce with the Sunni Awakening groups.

MP3 here. (20:06)

Robert Parry is an investigative journalist who won the George Polk Award in 1984 for reporting on the Iran-Contra affair and uncovering Oliver North’s involvement in it. He is the founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com and author of Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush, Trick or Treason: The October Surprise Mystery and Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_26_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the 3-way Shi’ite alliance of Moqtada al-Sadr, Nouri al-Maliki and Iran that formed in general opposition to U.S. occupation and attacks on Sadr’s Mahdi Army in particular, indications that Maliki had foreknowledge of the successful 2007 plot to kidnap U.S. soldiers in Karbala, the give-and-take exchange of political favors between Sadr and Maliki, the Bush administration’s attempt to exterminate the Mahdi Army – which they saw as an Iranian proxy, doubts about the SOFA 2011 withdrawal deadline and the possible future change in Iraq’s primary sectarian conflict from Shi’ite v. Sunni to Kurd v. Arab.

MP3 here. (42:29)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_25_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the maintenance of order and civility in Kyrgyzstan despite a rather chaotic election result, the already infamous Frago 242 order (revealed by WikiLeaks) issued from high up the chain of command that demanded U.S. soldiers ignore the torture and human rights violations perpetrated by their Iraqi allies, Donald Rumsfeld’s (purposeful?) ignorance of the obligation of soldiers to prevent inhumane treatment, a helpful aid to New York Times writers who must use euphemisms to tiptoe around the word “torture,” the preference of U.S. media outlets for Julian Assange hit pieces rather than his organization’s actual leaked documents, the Republican Party’s dominant historical role in originating and advancing anti-torture laws and why the Department of Justice will have to be dragged kicking and screaming into prosecuting crimes committed by the Bush and Obama administrations.

MP3 here. (39:40)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_25_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses Omar Khadr‘s plight from when he was a 15 year old battlefield prisoner in Afghanistan to a 24 year old defendant in a Guantanamo courtroom, how Khadr’s guilty plea deal covers up the gaping legal holes in the Military Commissions that a trial would have exposed and how the U.S. ignored international standards of conduct regarding child soldiers.

MP3 here. (10:36)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. His documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo is available on DVD.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_25_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses Richard Holbrooke’s admission that military victory in Afghanistan is impossible, the unhelpful and over-broad application of the “Taliban” label to a a myriad of groups opposing occupation, why the “clear and hold” strategy is apparently too boring to pursue for long, schizophrenic U.S. policy in Somalia and why WikiLeaks’ biggest leak ever could use a university graduate program to help sort through the nearly 400,000 documents.

MP3 here. (24:41)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Nat Hentoff

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_22_hentoff.mp3]

Nat Hentoff, senior fellow at the CATO Institute, discusses the media’s narrow spectrum of allowable opinions reflected in the firing/retiring of Juan Williams, Helen Thomas and Rick Sanchez, the dangers lurking within the massive Obamacare bill, the bipartisan uproar against a judicial ruling excluding evidence obtained by torture in the terrorism prosecution of Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani and how the government torture apparatus’s continued use explains Obama’s “look forward not back” self-immunizing tag line.

MP3 here. (30:02)

Nat Hentoff is a senior fellow at the CATO Institute and one of the foremost authorities on the First Amendment. His column, Sweet Land of Liberty, has been distributed by the United Feature Syndicate since 1992.

Hentoff has earned numerous awards and is a widely acknowledged defender of civil liberties. In 1980, he was awarded an American Bar Association Silver Gavel Award for his coverage of the law and criminal justice in his columns. In 1983, the American Library Association awarded him the Imroth Award for Intellectual Freedom. In 1995, he received the National Press Foundation Award for Distinguished Contributions to Journalism, and in 1999, he was a Pulitzer finalist for commentary.

Hentoff was a columnist and staff writer with The Village Voice for 51 years, from 1957 until 2008. A jazz expert, Hentoff writes on music for The Wall Street Journal and Jazz Times. He has lectured at many colleges, universities, law schools, elementary, middle and high schools, and has taught courses in journalism and the Constitution at Princeton University and New York University. Hentoff serves on the Board of Advisors of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (F.I.R.E.) and is on the steering committee of the Reporters’ Committee for the Freedom of the Press.

Thomas Nash

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_22_nash.mp3]

Thomas Nash, Coordinator of the Cluster Munition Coalition (StopClusterMunitions.org), discusses the encouraging progress being made on the internationally-binding Convention on Cluster Munitions treaty, the devastating bombing campaign against Laos during the Vietnam War that left behind some 280 million cluster munitions that continue to kill and maim decades later, the refusal of the most prolific cluster bomb using-and-producing countries (U.S., China, Russia, Israel) to sign the treaty and how the expensive and difficult cluster munition cleanups are yet another uncalculated cost of war.

MP3 here. (18:06)

Thomas Nash is Coordinator of the Cluster Munition Coalition.

Stephan Salisbury

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_22_salisbury_merged.mp3]

Stephan Salisbury, author of Mohamed’s Ghosts: An American Story of Love and Fear in the Homeland, discusses the double life of famed civil rights movement photographer and FBI informant Ernest C. Withers, journalists who gave up on scrutinizing governmental abuses to act as official stenographers and apologists, how zealous FBI informants create more terrorist plots than they uncover, the vast scale of NSA information gathering and the crackdown on political activism since the run up to the Iraq war.

MP3 here. (34:23)

Stephan Salisbury is cultural writer for the Philadelphia Inquirer. His most recent book is Mohamed’s Ghosts: An American Story of Love and Fear in the Homeland.

Nick Turse

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_22_turse.mp3]

Nick Turse, author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives and editor of The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan, discusses the construction boom in U.S. military bases that puts the scheduled 2011 Afghanistan drawdown in doubt, how Obama has abdicated his role of commander in chief to his generals and why it remains difficult to understand the purpose of the huge waste of blood and treasure in Afghanistan.

MP3 here. (16:52)

Nick Turse is an award-winning journalist, historian, essayist, and the associate editor of the Nation Institute’s Tomdispatch.com.  He is the author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives.

Jim Hanon

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_22_hanon.mp3]

Jim Hanon, writer and director of the documentary Little Town of Bethlehem, discusses his film (the story of three men of different faiths who grew up in Israel and the occupied territories who put aside their differences to work toward a non-violent solution to the Israel/Palestine conflict), why the term “settlements” does not adequately describe the Israeli homes built atop stolen Palestinian land, a reminder to American evangelicals that there are indeed Palestinian Christians and why establishing a functional civil society is essential to lasting peace.

MP3 here. (18:04)

Jim Hanon is a former advertising executive. He wrote and directed the documentary film Little Town of Bethlehem.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_22_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger’s just-declassified 1987 statement (excerpted from a still-classified 46 page declaration of damage) that called for the harsh punishment of pro-Israel spy Jonathan Pollard, how the release of Weinberger’s full declaration could substantiate allegations that Pollard’s disclosure caused the death of many CIA agents, the story of Israel’s 1954 “Lavon Affair” false flag operation in Egypt and how Israel consistently uses inside information to sabotage U.S. foreign relations with other countries.

MP3 here. (20:16)

Grant F. Smith is the author of Spy Trade: How Israel’s Lobby Undermines America’s Economy, America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government and Foreign Agents: The American Israel Public Affairs Committee from the 1963 Fulbright Hearings to the 2005 Espionage Scandal. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_21_escobar.mp3]

Asia Times columnist Pepe Escobar discusses his article “And the winner is … Muqtada,” whether an Iraqi civil war will commence if and when a coalition government excluding Sunnis is formed, hopes that national identity can trump factional and religious schisms and the pie-in-the-sky neoconservative dreams of winning hearts and minds throughout the Middle East.

MP3 here. (20:02)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_20_vlahos.mp3]

Featured Antiwar.com columnist Kelley B. Vlahos discusses the waning popularity of COIN strategy even among its strongest former proponents, the return of heavy air strikes and conventional warfare tactics in Afghanistan, the limited effectiveness of backroom negotiations with the Taliban due to missing key players, the increasingly difficult search for a face-saving exit strategy from Afghanistan and the liberal interventionist Democrats who dream of exporting freedom and democracy via military might across the world.

MP3 here. (19:36)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos, a Washington, D.C.-based freelance writer, is a longtime political reporter for FoxNews.com, a contributing editor at The American Conservative magazine and featured Antiwar.com columnist. She is also a Washington correspondent for Homeland Security Today magazine.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_20_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses the longstanding corruption of Pakistan’s civilian leadership and judicial system, the hidden and undemocratic method of U.S. war funding and why it’s long past time to bring the troops home from their myriad places of occupation.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_20_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the U.N. fact finding mission that concluded Israeli commandos executed flotilla-activist and U.S. citizen Furkan Dogan, the media blackout (and silence from the Obama administration) on the U.N. report and any discussion of Israel’s culpability and how the threshold for using lethal force was lowered after initial boarding attempts by the Israeli commandos were thwarted.

MP3 here. (18:11)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com

Robert A. Pape

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_20_pape.mp3]

Robert A. Pape, coauthor of Cutting the Fuse: The Explosion of Global Suicide Terrorism and How to Stop It, discusses the evidence that (still) shows suicide attacks are much more closely related to foreign military occupations than religious extremism, why U.S. efforts to date have been more effective at provoking terrorism than preventing it, the inverse correlation between troop levels and suicide attacks in Iraq and Afghanistan and how Pape’s thesis is finally catching on in media and government circles.

MP3 here. (15:30)

Robert A. Pape is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago specializing in international security affairs. His publications include Dying to Win: The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism (Random House 2005); Bombing to Win: Air Power and Coercion in War (Cornell 1996), “Why Economic Sanctions Do Not Work,” International Security (1997), “The Determinants of International Moral Action,” International Organization (1999); “The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism,” American Political Science Review (2003); and “Soft Balancing against the United States,” International Security (2005).

His commentary on international security policy has appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, New Republic, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, and Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, as well as on Nightline, ABC News, CBS News, CNN, Fox News, and National Public Radio. Before coming to Chicago in 1999, he taught international relations at Dartmouth College for five years and air power strategy for the USAF’s School of Advanced Airpower Studies for three years. He received his Ph. D. from the University of Chicago in 1988 and graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Pittsburgh in 1982. His current work focuses on the causes of suicide terrorism and the politics of unipolarity.

Andrew Cockburn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_20_cockburn.mp3]

Andrew Cockburn, author of Rumsfeld: His Rise, Fall and Catastrophic Legacy, discusses his review of Joy Gordon’s Invisible War: The United States and the Iraq Sanctions, how innocuous-sounding sanctions fail to engender the popular opposition that a war does even though the death and destruction levels are on par and how the Clinton administration changed the requirements to end sanctions to depose Saddam Hussein and score domestic political points.

MP3 here. (20:19)

Andrew Cockburn is the author of Rumsfeld: His Rise, Fall and Catastrophic Legacy, and co-producer of American Casino, a documentary on the origins and consequences of the financial crash. He is a writer and lecturer on defense and national affairs and has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, Playboy, Vanity Fair, and National Geographic, among other publications.

Robert Dreyfuss

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_19_dreyfuss.mp3]

Robert Dreyfuss, author of The Dreyfuss Report blog for The Nation, discusses why the U.S. is scared of Moqtada al-Sadr’s participation in an Iraqi coalition government, how the prolonged political stalemate threatens to fracture Iraqi society and why the U.S. must use long-neglected diplomatic skills and play nice with Pakistan and Iran to achieve peaceful resolutions in Afghanistan and Iraq.

MP3 here. (21:54)

Robert Dreyfuss, a Nation contributing editor, is an investigative journalist in Alexandria, Virginia, specializing in politics and national security. He is the author of Devil’s Game: How the United States Helped Unleash Fundamentalist Islam and is a frequent contributor to Rolling Stone, The American Prospect, and Mother Jones.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_19_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the 2010 revision of the National Intelligence Estimate on Iran, how the final version will admit there’s no evidence of an Iranian nuclear weapons program while leaving enough room for interpretation to keep the neocons happy, the replacement of National Security Advisor James Jones and why a Gulf of Tonkin-style provocation may be in store for Iran.

MP3 here. (27:45)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Jason Leopold

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_19_leopold.mp3]

Jason Leopold, investigative reporter and Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout, discusses how Paul Wolfowitz provided legal cover for human experimentation on “enemy combatant” prisoners, leaked torture notes that clearly indicate a focus on technique refinement rather than intelligence gathering, the Bush administration’s liberal use of since-discredited torture “evidence” obtained from Abu Zubaydah and the many missing pieces of the torture story yet to be found.

MP3 here. (27:26)

Jason Leopold is an investigative reporter and the Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout. His in-depth coverage includes the US Attorney firing scandal, the leak of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilsion and the Bush administration’s torture program. He is a two-time winner of the Project Censored award for his investigative work on Halliburton and Enron, and in March 2008, was awarded the Thomas Jefferson award by The Military Religious Freedom Foundation for a series of stories on the rise of Christian fundamentalism in the US military.

Leopold also received the Dow Jones Newswires Journalist of the Year Award in 2001 for his reporting on Enron and the California energy crisis. He has worked as an editor and reporter at the Los Angeles Times and was Los Angeles bureau chief of Dow Jones Newswires. He is the author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, News Junkie, a memoir.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_18_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses current events in Yemen, the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks and U.S. opposition to an Iraqi government power-sharing deal that includes Muqtada al-Sadr.

MP3 here. (17:54)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_18_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the scant evidence used to justify U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan, a possible CIA destabilization campaign to weaken Pakistan and seize its nukes and why the Afghanistan “Potemkin” War continues even though everyone knows it’s a lost cause.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_18_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses the goings-on at the recent Libertopia festival in Hollywood, CA,  how the facade of democracy makes government predation socially acceptable and why Islamic fear-mongering gets worse during Democratic administrations.

MP3 here. (37:44)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_01_giraldi.mp3]

[I’ve been out of town takin’ care of some bidness. Show returns at its regular time on Monday. 1,500 re-runs here. -Scott]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the establishment of CIA front companies in Yemen and Somalia that may presage military incursions, the exorbitant price we pay to maintain an empire at permanent war, the 180 degree divergence between Obama’s rhetoric and actions and why terrorism itself can’t destroy the U.S. but decades of overreaction can.

MP3 here. (29:59)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_01_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses the Israel-Palestine peace talks that exist only as a U.S. midterm election political sideshow, the quick and effective legal solution to the problem of excessive Israel-lobby influence, the pattern of generous treatment toward spies Marc Rich and Ben-Ami Kadish that could mean a Jonathan Pollard pardon is in the works and why learning the identity of super-spy “Mega” isn’t very important while Congress regularly performs the same role.

MP3 here. (27:11)

Grant F. Smith is the author of Spy Trade: How Israel’s Lobby Undermines America’s Economy, America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government and Foreign Agents: The American Israel Public Affairs Committee from the 1963 Fulbright Hearings to the 2005 Espionage Scandal. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_27_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses the popular fear that an all-powerful global Islamic Caliphate is impending – despite the fact nearly all Muslim countries are controlled by U.S.-friendly authoritarian governments, the displacement of ancient Christian communities during the U.S. occupation of Iraq and the resemblance of America’s increasing paranoia about Muslims to German antipathy toward Jews in the interwar period.

MP3 here. (20:22)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate, hosts the Pro Libertate Radio show on the Liberty News Radio Network and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Reese Erlich

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_27_erlich.mp3]

Reese Erlich, author of Conversations with Terrorists: Middle East Leaders on Politics, Violence, and Empire, discusses his firsthand account of Iranian street protests following the disputed 2009 election, why the CIA will have trouble co-opting the agendas of Iran’s opposition political parties, the Western tendency to ignore the existence of moderates and focus on the most radical element in Iran (oscillating from the ayatollahs to the president) and how the 1953 coup proves that U.S. policy is to install friendly regimes of any sort while paying lip service to democratic government.

MP3 here. (14:24)

Reese Erlich is the author of The Iran Agenda: The Real Story of U.S. Policy and the Middle East Crisis, Target Iraq: What the News Media Didn’t Tell You and Dateline Havana: The Real Story of U.S. Policy and the Future of Cuba. He also produced a one-hour public radio documentary, “The Struggle for Iran.”

In June 2009 he covered the elections in Iran, when an estimated one million demonstrators marched through the streets of Iran. Previously, Erlich had traveled to Iran with the actor Sean Penn. Erlich’s photos accompanied Penn’s five-part series about the trip that appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle and later in an A&E biography of Penn.

Erlich’s career in journalism goes back more than 40 years, beginning at Ramparts, a national, investigative reporting magazine published in San Francisco, followed by a stint teaching journalism at Bay Area universities for 10 years. He is a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster and produced acclaimed radio documentaries, which have aired internationally, including “The Russia Project,” “Reaching for Peace in the Holy Land” and “Lessons from Hiroshima 60 Years Later,” all hosted by Walter Cronkite, the legendary CBS news anchor. His documentary “Children of War” was hosted by Charlayne Hunter Gault of NPR and PBS. He reports regularly for a variety of radio networks, including NPR, CBC, ABC (Australia), Radio Deutsche Welle, as well as KQED Radio News and The California Report.

His newspaper articles have appeared in numerous papers in the United States and around the world, including the Christian Science Monitor, the San Francisco Chronicle, St. Petersburg Times, The New York Times Syndicate, Dallas Morning News, and the Chicago Tribune.