Scott Horton Interviews The Other Scott Horton

Scott Horton, October 26, 2010

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The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the maintenance of order and civility in Kyrgyzstan despite a rather chaotic election result, the already infamous Frago 242 order (revealed by WikiLeaks) issued from high up the chain of command that demanded U.S. soldiers ignore the torture and human rights violations perpetrated by their Iraqi allies, Donald Rumsfeld’s (purposeful?) ignorance of the obligation of soldiers to prevent inhumane treatment, a helpful aid to New York Times writers who must use euphemisms to tiptoe around the word “torture,” the preference of U.S. media outlets for Julian Assange hit pieces rather than his organization’s actual leaked documents, the Republican Party’s dominant historical role in originating and advancing anti-torture laws and why the Department of Justice will have to be dragged kicking and screaming into prosecuting crimes committed by the Bush and Obama administrations.

MP3 here. (39:40)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

2 Responses to “The Other Scott Horton”

  1. Clearly the solution for wikileaks is for the pentagon to stop collecting any records at all. They don't ever learn from their mistakes, so it's a mystery to me why they bother to keep track.

  2. A to me most striking interview with the other Scott Horton. The war crimes are EVIDENT! And the cowardness of the American establishment blatantly so too. It is time to consider what aspects of the regime that DESTROYS people's honesty and morality.

    If you see any movie back from before WW2, like "Talk of the Town" or for that sake Fred Astaire in his 1940 Broadway musical, you simply meet MUCH loftier people. (The 2 Scott Horton is on that level too.)

    An incredible corruption of minds has happened gradually. Now who wants to uphold a regime that furthers that?

    I recently revisited some sci-fi movies of the 50's, and clearly they depicted exactly dangers of that sort..

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