Scott Horton Interviews Gareth Porter

Scott Horton, October 27, 2010

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the 3-way Shi’ite alliance of Moqtada al-Sadr, Nouri al-Maliki and Iran that formed in general opposition to U.S. occupation and attacks on Sadr’s Mahdi Army in particular, indications that Maliki had foreknowledge of the successful 2007 plot to kidnap U.S. soldiers in Karbala, the give-and-take exchange of political favors between Sadr and Maliki, the Bush administration’s attempt to exterminate the Mahdi Army – which they saw as an Iranian proxy, doubts about the SOFA 2011 withdrawal deadline and the possible future change in Iraq’s primary sectarian conflict from Shi’ite v. Sunni to Kurd v. Arab.

MP3 here. (42:29)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

3 Responses to “Gareth Porter”

  1. Part 1
    I always enjoy and learn from Mr. Porter's interviews but I feel like he feels a need to assign some sort of authority over events that really wasn't there. To say that what has happened in Iraq over the last few years is almost exactly what the Sadrists, Maliki and Iran wanted is to ignore the essential unmanageability of events and people involved in the build up to the current political situation. I also think that he assigns too much of an idea of a cohesive goal or set of goals of the US government that have been subverted by the Iraqis but that also will not allow them to pack up and leave.

  2. Part 2
    The plan was to go into Iraq, blow shit up and kick out Saddam. The problem was and always has been that there never was an idea of what to do once that occurred. They kind of shocked and awed themselves. The people at the head of the US government have been searching for a way out for years now and a combination of the surge domestically and the fact that they were forced by the Iraqis to eat a big heaping pile of humble pie within Iraq means that they are leaving for good. The Iraqis have decided they can't stay and politically within Iraq the US has absolutely zero options and militarily they have no where else to turn. They will leave in an orderly fashion very shortly, perhaps try to rile something up covertly using contractors but none of that amount to shit. It's over!

  3. Wonder if it would be good for the U.S. troops to stay & fight again in Iraq, since the alternative might be a U.S. invasion of Iran. /snark

Leave a Reply