Michael Hastings

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_22_hastings.mp3]

Michael Hastings, author of the infamous article “The Runaway General” in Rolling Stone magazine, discusses the seeming resolution of Iraq’s incredibly lengthy government-formation process; the firm Shi’ite grip on power and long-term marginalization of Sunnis (exemplified by their go-to man in government, the Shia Ayad Allawi); Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki’s conflicted and complicated relationship with Iran; and the remarkably successful Gen. Petraeus Iraq surge (narrative).

MP3 here. (17:01)

Michael Hastings is the author of I Lost My Love in Baghdad: A Modern War Story. In 2008, he covered the U.S. presidential elections for Newsweek, and before that he was the magazine’s Baghdad correspondent. His articles have appeared in GQ, Slate, Salon, Foreign Policy, the LA Times, and other publications. His blog The Hastings Report focuses on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and other foreign policy topics.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_24_kpfk_porter.mp3]

This recording is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of December 24th. The original program can be heard here.

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the New York Times story about a leaked military proposal for snatch and grab raids targeting Afghan insurgent leaders inside Pakistan (in the hopes that interrogations would yield an intelligence bonanza); the severe consequences this “cockamamie” idea would have for Pakistan’s already weak civilian government; why Pakistan’s national security remains tied to the Taliban, in opposition to the India-friendly Karzai regime and Northern Alliance remnants; how political realities in the US keep the Afghanistan War going despite the fact it’s a well-known lost cause; and why the White House will probably be responsive to US special forces raids in Pakistan.

MP3 here. (28:52)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Stephen Webster

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_22_webster.mp3]

Stephen Webster, Senior Editor at RawStory.com, discusses the WikiLeaks-revealed diplomatic cable that shows how the US got troops stationed in Colombia by dodging legislative review; close cooperation between the US embassy and then-President Álvaro Uribe Vélez to escalate the US military presence (that regional rival Venezuela viewed as war preparation); how the mainstream media proves its worthlessness by refusing to properly investigate the gold mine of WikiLeaks revelations; evidence of State Department lobbying on behalf of US corporations and lobbies including the MPAA and Monsanto; and why net neutrality and internet freedom remain under threat (to the delight of China-admirer Joe Lieberman).

MP3 here. (19:30)

Stephen C. Webster is Senior Editor at RawStory.com

Jason Leopold

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_21_leopold.mp3]

Jason Leopold, investigative reporter and Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout, discusses how a new $35 million bribe convinced Nigeria to forget about extraditing former Halliburton CEO and vice president Dick Cheney on bribery charges; new developments in the previously-discussed Malaria drug-experimentation on Guantanamo prisoners; the numerous government agencies that signed off on the controversial treatment; and how the medical records of Guantanamo prisoners are being withheld out of “privacy concerns.”

MP3 here. (19:12)

Jason Leopold is an investigative reporter and the Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout. His in-depth coverage includes the US Attorney firing scandal, the leak of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilsion and the Bush administration’s torture program. He is a two-time winner of the Project Censored award for his investigative work on Halliburton and Enron, and in March 2008, was awarded the Thomas Jefferson award by The Military Religious Freedom Foundation for a series of stories on the rise of Christian fundamentalism in the US military.

Leopold also received the Dow Jones Newswires Journalist of the Year Award in 2001 for his reporting on Enron and the California energy crisis. He has worked as an editor and reporter at the Los Angeles Times and was Los Angeles bureau chief of Dow Jones Newswires. He is the author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, News Junkie, a memoir.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_21_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, author of The Left, The Right and The State, discusses the life and work of Ludwig von Mises, who integrated business cycle theory into a comprehensive Austrian School of economics; how Murray N. Rothbard helped make opposition to war a core principle of libertarianism; and why Ron Paul’s appointment as Chairman of the Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee should make for some interesting conflicts with the Fed and Wall Street banks.

MP3 here. (18:50)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_22_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the pending executive order authorizing indefinite detention; why Congress’s refusal to close Guantanamo isn’t being challenged by Obama (who seems to have forgotten his promise); the vague domestic terrorism threats that have Attorney General Eric Holder shaking in his loafers; how the alliance of opposition groups in Somalia portends more violence and threatens the Western-backed government; and why Somalia was better off without a government.

MP3 here. (19:34)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Debra Sweet

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_17_sweet.mp3]

This interview was conducted by Antiwar Radio producer Angela Keaton.

Debra Sweet, National Director of World Can’t Wait, discusses her participation in the White House antiwar protests; the pro-WikiLeaks ads in major US papers sponsored by the Australian activist group GetUp; how the candid statement of Defense Secretary Robert Gates dispels the illusion of representative government in the US; Obama’s continuing rightward drift; how the “material support” of terrorism statute criminalizes political speech; and the secret US war in Pakistan revealed by WikiLeaks.

MP3 here. (16:55)

Debra Sweet is the National Director of The World Can’t Wait. The World Can’t Wait organizes people living in the United States to repudiate and stop the fascist direction initiated by the Bush Regime, including: the murderous, unjust and illegitimate occupations of Iraq and Afghanistan; the global “war of terror” of torture, rendition and spying; and the culture of bigotry, intolerance and greed.

This direction cannot and will not be reversed by leaders who tell us to seek common ground with fascists, religious fanatics, and empire. It can only be possible by the people building a community of resistance – an independent mass movement of people – acting in the interests of humanity to stop, and demand prosecution, of these crimes.

Frank Dorrel

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_17_dorrel.mp3]

Frank Dorrel, publisher and distributor of the antiwar comic book Addicted to War, discusses how he turned to antiwar activism after serving in the US Air Force during Vietnam; his film “What I’ve Learned About U.S. Foreign Policy: The War Against The Third World;” how activist education helps Americans wake up to the destructive nature of their government; and why many Americans self-identify through a “civic religion” of indoctrinated nationalism.

MP3 here. (19:23)

Frank Dorrel publishes & distributes Addicted to War, Why The U.S. Can’t Kick Militarism by Joel Andreas. This anti-war comic book is a history of U.S. militarism and has become one of the most popular books in the Peace Movement. It is being used in hundreds of high schools and colleges all over the country.

He put together the 2-hour film titled “What I’ve Learned About U.S. Foreign Policy: The War Against The Third World,” which has been seen by as many as 2 million people since 2000.

Dorrel is a US Air Force veteran and member of Veterans For Peace, both local and national chapters. He helped to start the Arlington West Memorial in Santa Monica, a project of the Los Angeles Chapter of Veterans For Peace. The Arlington West Memorial has been erected next to the Santa Monica Pier each and every Sunday since February 2004.

Frank’s daily ATW-NEWS Email List lets fellow activists know where and when local anti-war events are happening. If you would like to get on this list, please send an email to Frank at: fdorrel@addictedtowar.com or fdorrel@sbcglobal.net

Nebojsa Malic

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_20_malic.mp3]

Nebojsa Malic, author of the “Moments of Transition” column on Antiwar.com, discusses the Council of Europe report on Kosovo’s “mafia-like” government that traffics in drugs, weapons and human organs; the KLA‘s speedy (and undeserved) 1998 transition from a US-designated terrorist group to a band of “freedom fighters;” the multitude of lies before, during and after the Kosovo War; how Richard Holbrooke helped negotiate the laudable Dayton Agreement bringing peace to Bosnia-Herzegovina then worked steadfastly to undermine it; and how the US effort to reinvigorate NATO – which became an anachronism after the Soviet collapse – can partly explain the seemingly strange US interest in Kosovo.

MP3 here. (22:07)

Nebojsa Malic writes the “Moments of Transition” (formerly Balkan Express) column for Antiwar.com and blogs at the Gray Falcon.

Patrick Cockburn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_20_cockburn.mp3]

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent, discusses the extreme poverty on display in Kabul despite the many NGOs and billions of dollars in aid spent since 2001; subcontracted rebuilding projects in dangerous and remote areas that are especially prone to fraud and waste; the Afghan government’s inextricable ties to the heroin trade; how the US squandered any goodwill remaining from overthrowing the Taliban; and how the US praises Afghan “democracy” while ignoring the request of supposed-potentate Hamid Karzai to stop night raids.

MP3 here. (22:10)

Patrick Cockburn was awarded the 2009 Orwell Prize for political writing in British journalism. He is the Middle East correspondent for The Independent and a frequent contributor to CounterPunch.org. Cockburn is the author of The Occupation: War, Resistance and Daily Life in Iraq and Muqtada Al-Sadr and the Battle for the Future of Iraq.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_20_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the increasingly brutal US tactics in the Kandahar offensive in Afghanistan including the razing of entire villages; how the US breaks self-imposed counterinsurgency rules when the going gets tough; the realization of mid-level officers and Petraeus himself that a tough new COIN strategy is as likely to fail as previous versions; and how the National Intelligence Estimates on Afghanistan and Pakistan reveal that US success in Afghanistan is wholly dependent on Pakistan’s rejection of the Taliban – which is exceedingly unlikely.

MP3 here. (27:44)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Glenn Greenwald

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_17_kpfk_greenwald.mp3]

Glenn Greenwald, Salon.com blogger and former constitutional lawyer, discusses the inhumane detention conditions of accused WikiLeaks source Bradley Manning; eyewitness accounts of Manning’s deteriorating mental and physical condition; studies that show severe isolation has long term psychological consequences and is akin to torture; the government’s domestic “shock and awe” campaign of fear and intimidation against dissidents and whistleblowers; why Manning’s draconian imprisonment may be a negotiating tactic to coerce testimony against Julian Assange; and why the government is now considering conspiracy charges against Assange instead of using the problematic Espionage Act of 1917.

MP3 here. (21:16)

Glenn Greenwald was a constitutional lawyer in New York City, first at the Manhattan firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, and then at the litigation firm he founded, Greenwald, Christoph. Greenwald litigated numerous high-profile and significant constitutional cases in federal and state courts around the country, including multiple First Amendment challenges. He has a J.D. from New York University School of Law (1994) and a B.A. from George Washington University (1990). In October of 2005, Greenwald started a political and legal blog, Unclaimed Territory, which quickly became one of the most popular and highest-trafficked in the blogosphere.

Upon disclosure by the New York Times in December 2005 of President Bush’s warrantless eavesdropping program, Greenwald became one of the leading and most cited experts on that controversy. In early 2006, he broke a story on his blog regarding the NSA scandal that served as the basis for front-page articles in the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers, all of which credited his blog for the story. Several months later, Sen. Russ Feingold read from one of Greenwald’s posts during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Feingold’s resolution to censure the president for violating FISA. In 2008, Sen. Chris Dodd read from Greenwald’s Salon blog during floor debate over FISA. Greenwald’s blog was also cited as one of the sources for the comprehensive report issued by Rep. John Conyers titled “The Constitution in Crisis.” In 2006, he won the Koufax Award for best new blog.

Greenwald is the author of A Tragic Legacy: How a Good vs. Evil Mentality Destroyed the Bush Presidency, How Would a Patriot Act? Defending American Values from a President Run Amok and Great American Hypocrites: Toppling the Big Myths of Republican Politics.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_15_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Nullification: How to Resist Federal Tyranny in the 21st Century, discusses the few Leftists and many libertarians working to shift the balance of power away from Washington and toward local control; why it’s still hard to shake the nearly 150-year old misconception that secessionists are slavery sympathizers; why an ignorant population is much more likely to inherit an authoritarian state than a libertarian paradise following a government and economic collapse; and polls that show a large majority of Americans prefer unchecked government secrecy and have no interest in maintaining a free press.

MP3 here. (19:19)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Kevin Zeese

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_15_zeese.mp3]

Kevin Zeese, Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace, discusses the December 16th White House protest designed to kick start the antiwar movement; what the Veterans for Peace organization is all about; the WikiLeaks is Democracy signed statement of support for Julian Assange and WikiLeaks; and uniting Left and Right around the core values of peace and the Bill of Rights.

MP3 here. (9:24)

Kevin Zeese  is the Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace. He also served as the Executive Director of Democracy Rising, is an attorney, and a long term peace advocate. He took a leave from VotersForPeace for most of 2006 while he was running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland. Zeese was a founding member of the Montgomery County Coalition Against the War in Maryland and has worked with various non-profit organizations on peace, justice, and democracy issues since 1978.

Rob Prince

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_13_prince.mp3]

Rob Prince, publisher of the Colorado Progressive Jewish News and lecturer at the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies, discusses the WikiLeaks Cablegate document that shows the Bush administration twisted Ethiopia’s arm to invade Somalia; how former Under Secretary of State for Africa Jendayi Frazer threw Ethiopia under the bus when the invasion turned sour; how the US used Ethiopia as a proxy army against the Union of Islamic Courts (presumably hated because of their name) while US forces were bogged down in Iraq and Afghanistan; why Condi Rice’s ignorance of world affairs (partly excepting Russia) is typical of American statesmen; how a respectable performance in Afghanistan could transform NATO into a worldwide police force; and the US search for a military foothold in Africa – preferably near the continent’s abundant mineral and energy resources.

MP3 here. (26:53)

Rob Prince is a lecturer at the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies and the founder and publisher of Colorado Progressive Jewish News.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_14_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses the partisan hypocrisy of Leftists who support Obama even though his presidency could just as well be Bush’s third term; the decimated ranks of activists opposed to the government’s “war on terror” premise; and how, every so often, someone takes the red pill and discovers the false paradigm of Republican/Democrat politics.

MP3 here. (17:38)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Mike Gogulski

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_09_gogulski.mp3]

Mike Gogulski, founder of the Bradley Manning Support Network, discusses the false rumor of Bradley Manning’s suicide; why the Cablegate documents look like dispatches to an emperor; the shortcoming in fundraising for Manning’s legal defense (due in part to WikiLeaks’ unfulfilled pledge); and fighting back against VISA, MasterCard, Amazon.com and other WikiLeaks suppressors through boycotts and cyber attacks.

MP3 here. (19:50)

Mike Gogulski is the founder of the BradleyManning.org website.

Coleen Rowley

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_13_rowley.mp3]

Coleen Rowley, retired FBI agent and 9/11 whistleblower, discusses her work as Chief Division Counsel at the Minneapolis FBI office; how FBI headquarters acted criminally negligent in preventing agents from properly investigating Zacarias Moussaoui before 9/11; how sloppy FISA legislation created a wall within and between intelligence agencies; why government transparency benefits the public far more than excessive secrecy; and the deeply flawed Whistleblower Protection Act that fails to cover employees of the 16 US intelligence agencies.

MP3 here. (27:49)

Coleen Rowley grew up in a small town in northeast Iowa. She obtained a B.A. degree in French from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa and then attended the College of Law at the University of Iowa. She graduated with honors in 1980 and passed the Iowa Bar Exam that summer.

In January of 1981, Ms. Rowley was appointed as a Special Agent with the FBI and initially served in the Omaha, Nebraska and Jackson, Mississippi Divisions. In 1984, she was assigned to the New York Office and for over six years worked on Italian-organized crime and Sicilian heroin drug investigations. During this time, Ms. Rowley also served three separate temporary duty assignments in the Paris, France Embassy and Montreal Consulate.

In 1990, Ms. Rowley was transferred to Minneapolis where she assumed the duties of Chief Division Counsel, which entailed oversight of the Freedom of Information, Forfeiture, Victim-Witness and Community Outreach Programs as well as providing regular legal and ethics training to FBI Agents of the Division and additional outside police training.

In May of 2002, Ms. Rowley brought several of the pre 9/11 lapses to light and testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee on some of the endemic problems facing the FBI and the intelligence community. Ms. Rowley’s memo to FBI Director Robert Mueller in connection with the Joint Intelligence Committee’s Inquiry led to a two-year-long Department of Justice Inspector General investigation. She was one of three whistleblowers chosen as Person of the Year by TIME magazine.

In April 2003, following an unsuccessful and highly criticized attempt to warn the Director and other administration officials about the dangers of launching the invasion of Iraq, Ms. Rowley stepped down from her (GS-14) legal position to resume her position as a (GS-13) FBI Special Agent. She retired from the FBI at the end of 2004 and now speaks publicly to various groups, ranging from school children to business/professional/civic groups, on two different topics: ethical decision-making and “balancing civil liberties with the need for effective investigation.”

Ms. Rowley authored a chapter in a book published in 2004 by the Milton Eisenhower Foundation entitled, Patriotism, Democracy and Common Sense: Restoring America’s Promise at Home and Abroad. She is also now an avid blogger on the Huffington Post.

Chris Deliso

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_13_deliso.mp3]

Chris Deliso, journalist, travel writer and author concentrating on the Balkans and Southeast Europe, discusses how WikiLeaks is turning traditional journalism on its head and making plenty of enemies along the way; the risk of deliberate media distortion when huge caches of primary sources are released at once and can’t be effectively vetted; the danger of false leaks receiving mass dissemination; how the future of journalism is tending toward interpretation of facts rather than investigative work; and how the public is susceptible to “leak overload” where blockbuster information is readily available but nobody cares.

MP3 here. (17:29)

Chris Deliso is an American journalist, travel writer and author concentrating on the Balkans and Southeast Europe, where he has lived and traveled for almost a decade. His criticisms of interventionist foreign policy can be found in his writings for Antiwar.com, and in his recent work on the West’s failures to eradicate foreign-funded Muslim extremists in the Balkans, The Coming Balkan Caliphate: The Threat of Radical Islam to Europe and the West (Praeger Security International, 2007). He is the director of Balkanalysis.com.

Mr. Deliso is the author of several travelogues, including Hidden Macedonia and Greece (Country Guide). He holds an MPhil with distinction in Byzantine Studies from Oxford University.

Robert Stinnett

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of December 10th. The entire half hour segment can be heard here.

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_10_kpfk_stinnett.mp3]

This interview of Robert Stinnett, author of Day of Deceit: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor, covers much of the same material from his previous interview of December 7th. There are additional discussions about Stinnett’s 1982 discovery of Pearl Harbor’s cryptographic listening station, the reclassification of WWII era documents following the PATRIOT Act’s passage and other topics of interest.

MP3 here. (17:48)

Robert Stinnett is a Media Fellow at The Independent Institute in Oakland, California, and author of George Bush: The War Years and Day of Deceit: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor. See the Independent Institute’s Pearl Harbor resources page here.

Max Blumenthal

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_09_blumenthal.mp3]

Max Blumenthal, author of Republican Gomorrah: Inside the Movement that Shattered the Party, discusses how the Carmel wildfire reveals Israel’s singular focus on militarization at the expense of basic public services like firefighting (necessitating humbling assistance from Turkey and the Palestinian Authority); how millions of trees hide the evidence of razed villages and the mass expulsion of Palestinians in the 1948 Nakba; touring the new bohemian village of Ein Hod where the mosque of the displaced Palestinian population was converted into a bar; how the evangelical Christian GOD TV network is funding the Jewish National Fund to plant a million trees in the Negev desert (displacing Bedouin residents) to advertise the second coming of Christ; and why the Israeli settlements can’t be undone while the government is staffed with, and controlled by, former and current settlers.

MP3 here. (21:17)

Max Blumenthal is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author whose articles and video documentaries have appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Daily Beast, The Nation, The Huffington Post, Salon.com, Al Jazeera English and many other publications. He is a writing fellow for the Nation Institute. His book, Republican Gomorrah: Inside The Movement That Shattered The Party, is a New York Times and Los Angeles Times bestseller.

William Buppert

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_09_buppert.mp3]

Bill Buppert, retired US Army officer and blogger, discusses the near-revolt of junior officers in the US armed forces over the bogus reasons given for war in Iraq and Afghanistan; COIN‘s failure against Islamic insurgencies dating back to WWII; how the immature antics of young soldiers deployed abroad make winning “hearts and minds” all but impossible; fascism in the form of the American Protective League during the Woodrow Wilson administration; the danger an unforeseen “black swan” event will suddenly collapse the US empire and economy; and how a single state seceding from the US will rapidly accelerate the nation’s dissolution.

MP3 here. (18:05)

Bill Buppert is a retired officer from the US Army living in the high desert of the American Southwest with his wife and home-schooled family. He has been a writer for a number of publications to include www.lewrockwell.com. He is particularly interested in the issues of liberty, survival, shooting and military history.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_08_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses why the corrupted Fourth Estate (traditional mainstream US media) needs to be supplanted by the Fifth Estate (WikiLeaks) to preserve our liberty; the State Department’s successful interference with Spanish and German courts seeking to indict US officials; how the general tenor of Cablegate documents suggests an empire falling apart; the oft-forgotten lesson of history that nothing good comes from an Afghanistan invasion; how a comparison of articles written (jointly and individually) by David E. Sanger and William J. Broad of the New York Times shows the former to be the warmongering hack; and George Bush’s apology to Israel and Saudi Arabia following the 2007 Iran NIE.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_08_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the dismissal of the CCR/ACLU lawsuit challenging the Obama administration’s authority to order the targeted killing of US citizen Anwar Al-Aulaqi; the legal paradox that requires the government to obtain a warrant for wiretapping but allows summary execution with no judicial oversight; why the government will probably make limited use of extrajudicial assassination but will not repudiate the executive authority to do so; Nigeria’s indictment of Dick Cheney for bribery that may require the US to deal with an extradition request; and how the US will probably seek to extradite Julian Assange as a material witness against Bradley Manning in an attempt to discredit WikiLeaks and deter future leakers.

MP3 here. (18:30)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Philip Weiss

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_08_weiss.mp3]

Philip Weiss, investigative journalist and author of the blog MondoWeiss, discusses the group of Israeli Rabbis advocating against leasing property to non-Jews (including Israeli Arab citizens); the end of the halfhearted US push for a West Bank settlement freeze; why the US can’t be an honest Israeli/Palestinian broker while Dennis Ross is more influential than George Mitchell; and why US Mideast policy won’t change while pro-Zionist American Jews remain empowered, outspoken and free from media scrutiny.

MP3 here. (19:40)

Philip Weiss is an investigative journalist who has written for The Nation, New York Times Magazine, The American Conservative, Jewish World Review and other publications. He is the author of American Taboo: A Murder in the Peace Corps.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_08_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the difficulty of repairing relations between Turkey and Israel while right-wing political pressure on Netanyahu keeps him from apologizing for the flotilla massacre; how further significant releases make it clear WikiLeaks is indeed performing a valuable public service (in contrast with Giraldi’s previous skepticism); how the US provides material support for terrorism – in terms of money and weapons for the PKK; and why the US is just asking for more blowback by supporting a fringe Marxist-Islamic cult against the Turkish state.

MP3 here. (18:09)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Robert Stinnett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_07_stinnett.mp3]

Robert Stinnett, author of Day of Deceit: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor, discusses how FDR provoked and allowed the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in order to rally the American people to support US entry in WWII; the provocative McCollum memo that proposed an 8-part strategy to isolate and weaken Japan; new evidence that shows Admiral Kimmel was indeed privy to FDR’s plans; and how – despite what some skeptics say – the Japanese naval and diplomatic codes were broken before the Pearl Harbor attack.

MP3 here. (19:45)

Robert Stinnett is a Media Fellow at The Independent Institute in Oakland, California, and author of George Bush: The War Years and Day of Deceit: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor. See the Independent Institute’s Pearl Harbor resources page here.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_07_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses Ben Bernanke’s 60 Minutes interview where he declares (with lip-quivering certitude) a “100 percent confidence” the Fed can control inflation; how the Fed filled up on bad assets full of “mystery meat” in their quantitative easing program(s); Republican deficit reduction plans that will be decimated from even a minuscule increase in interest rates; the crisis in fiat money as most of the world’s currencies are debased relative to hard assets; and why Americans are still asleep at the switch while their government actively destroys the economy.

MP3 here. (37:57)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_07_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the dominant (and false) narrative of MSM coverage of WikiLeaks‘ Cablegate; why a US war with Iran is not justified simply because some Arab rulers (in complete opposition to their citizens) say they are threatened by Iran’s nuclear program; how the New York Times dutifully and predictably spins the news to promote the US government’s agenda; why King Abdullah’s line on “cutting off the head” of the Iranian snake is probably nothing more than sycophantic bluster; the deep concerns of other Gulf state leaders on military action against Iran; and why US-Iran talks are certainly doomed (if they weren’t already) in this environment.

MP3 here. (17:34)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_06_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses the Obama administration’s claim that they have the right to kill American citizens without a trial, without notice, and without any chance for targets to legally object; the unfortunate American tendency toward blind deference to the law even (and especially) when it is unjust; how George W. Bush was given a GOP standing ovation as a reward for trashing the Constitution; and why the WikiLeaks issue is an excellent yardstick for measuring a person’s dedication to freedom and individual liberty.

MP3 here. (20:01)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

Eli Clifton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_06_clifton.mp3]

Eli Clifton, U.S. foreign policy writer at the Washington bureau of IPS News, discusses Lobelog’s Daily Talking Points feature that keeps tabs on the war party’s Iran hawks; contradictory evidence to the MSM’s claim that Arab governments want war with Iran; neocon efforts to scuttle the diplomatic “linkage” of the Palestine problem with other regional affairs; why Hillary Clinton’s softened rhetoric on Iran’s civilian nuclear energy program doesn’t indicate a policy shift; and how establishing a designed-to-fail sanctions regime has been a reliable way to start a war.

MP3 here. (19:37)

Eli Clifton writes on U.S. foreign policy as well as trade and finance at the Washington bureau of IPS. His articles have also appeared on Right Web and in the South China Morning Post. Eli has a B.A. in Political Science from Bates College and an MSc in International Political Economy from the London School of Economics.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_06_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the worldwide crackdown on WikiLeaks and Julian Assange; why – despite the government’s uproar about “dangerous” leaks – there’s not even a pretense of holding State Department officials accountable for their criminal actions; how Cablegate shows the US government is well aware how badly the Afghanistan occupation is going; why European governments believe Afghanistan is a lost cause but continue support out of deference to the US; and why Iraq’s fledgling government isn’t likely to survive long.

MP3 here. (18:53)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Hillary Mann Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_04_kpfk_leverett.mp3]

This interview is from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of December 3rd, available here.

Hillary Mann Leverett, former State Department official and co-founder of The Race For Iran, discusses Obama’s campaign rhetoric about diplomatic engagement with enemy states and his subsequent appointment of advisers with contrary views; WikiLeaks cables that clearly show the duplicity of Obama’s dealings with Iran; how the 3-party enriched uranium swap deal was deliberately sabotaged – in part by the US rebuff of Turkey’s mediation efforts – in order to get support for new Iran sanctions; how Iran’s nuclear program is used to check its rise as a regional power – which is the primary US concern; how the Iraq invasion shifted the balance of Mideast power away from autocratic US allies; and the evidence that Islamic countries have no problem putting their national interests ahead of religious concerns.

MP3 here. (27:58)

Hillary Mann Leverett is a Middle East analyst and former State Department and National Security Council official. She is currently the chief executive officer of STRATEGA, a political risk consulting firm. She worked for many years in the US government on a number of Middle East issues, including as Middle East expert for the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff; political adviser on the Middle East, Sudan, and Central Asia at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, and in U.S. embassies in Egypt, Israel, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia; and Director for Iran, Afghanistan and Persian Gulf Affairs at the National Security Council. As one of a small number of U.S. officials authorized to negotiate directly with senior Iranian officials she participated in a number of secret negotiations on Afghanistan, al-Qaeda and Iraq.

Hillary is a Senior Fellow at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. She writes frequently on Middle Eastern, Russian and South Asian issues in publications such as the New York Times, The National Interest and The Wall Street Journal.

Jason Leopold

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_03_leopold.mp3]

Jason Leopold, investigative reporter and Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout, discusses the standard Guantanamo practice of forcing detainees to take dangerously high doses of potent antimalarial drugs; how the long-lasting psychiatric side effects of mefloquine may have been exploited as yet another “enhanced interrogation” tactic; and how the exacerbated effect of mefloquine on those with PTSD and other mental impairments could explain the 2002 rash of Fort Bragg wife-murders.

MP3 here. (19:31)

Jason Leopold is an investigative reporter and the Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout. His in-depth coverage includes the US Attorney firing scandal, the leak of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilsion and the Bush administration’s torture program. He is a two-time winner of the Project Censored award for his investigative work on Halliburton and Enron, and in March 2008, was awarded the Thomas Jefferson award by The Military Religious Freedom Foundation for a series of stories on the rise of Christian fundamentalism in the US military.

Leopold also received the Dow Jones Newswires Journalist of the Year Award in 2001 for his reporting on Enron and the California energy crisis. He has worked as an editor and reporter at the Los Angeles Times and was Los Angeles bureau chief of Dow Jones Newswires. He is the author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, News Junkie, a memoir.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_03_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the WikiLeaks-revealed US negotiations to offload Guantanamo inmates scheduled for release; why resettling wrongfully-imprisoned Guantanamo detainees in the US remains politically impossible; how Obama can’t – or won’t – stand up to Republicans who won’t countenance the possibility of closing Gitmo and holding terrorism trials in federal courts; and the large portion of Americans subscribing to Sarah Palin’s fact-free worldview.

MP3 here. (18:18)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. His documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo is available on DVD.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_02_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the extraordinary effort by the US State Department to scuttle the indictments of American government and military officials in Spanish courts; how the US embassy in Madrid effectively manipulated Spanish prosecutors, judges and the judicial system at large; the leaked diplomatic cable addressed to Condi Rice about German rendition victim Khaled El-Masri and the successful US effort to stop the indictment of 13 CIA officers in a German court; the appearance that subsequent DOJ investigations were initiated only to provide an excuse for European governments to quash their own investigations; how the vigorous government cover-ups of Bush administration crimes shows Obama wasn’t kidding about not “looking back;” and the pending Nigerian indictment of Dick Cheney in connection with the huge bribery scandal during his tenure as Halliburton CEO.

MP3 here. (27:31)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Larisa Alexandrovna

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_02_alexandrovna.mp3]

Larisa Alexandrovna, Managing Editor of investigative news for RawStory, discusses her article on diplomatic talks between the US and Israel revealed by WikiLeaks; Mossad Director Meir Dagan’s attempt to give the US no alternative to a war with Iran; the five pillars of Israeli strategy for regime change in Iran, meant to be implemented simultaneously; and indications US and Israeli support for the MEK has enabled terrorist attacks inside Iran.

MP3 here. (17:00)

Larisa Alexandrovna is an investigative journalist, covering mostly national security and intelligence. She is currently the Managing Editor of investigative news for the Raw Story. She is a contributor to Alternet, The Huffington Post, and other publications.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_02_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the standard WikiLeaks put-downs: Assange is a terrorist with blood on his hands and the leaks don’t reveal anything important that wasn’t already known; Glenn Greenwald’s article that shows the war party’s blood lust is never satiated; how the most hyped MSM story derived from Cablegate on Iran’s missile program turned out to be bogus; proof that Abu Ghraib inspired hundreds of Saudis to fight the US; and why the US policy on torture is now made by presidential decree instead of law.

MP3 here. (19:08)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Melvin Goodman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_03_goodman.mp3]

Melvin Goodman, former senior Soviet analyst at the CIA, discusses why WikiLeaks’ Cablegate is a big data-dump and not the work of foreign intelligence services; documents that show inaccurate information flowing from the US embassy in Georgia back to Washington during the S. Ossetia conflict; disagreements about the quality and honesty of journalism in the NYT and Washington Post; and the question why – if these cables are so ordinary and unremarkable – are so many of them classified?

MP3 here. (18:17)

Melvin A. Goodman is senior fellow at the Center for International Policy and adjunct professor of government at Johns Hopkins University. His most recent book is Failure of Intelligence: The Decline and Fall of the CIA. From 1966 to 1990, he was senior Soviet analyst at the CIA and the Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research.

Doug Bandow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_01_bandow.mp3]

Doug Bandow, senior fellow at the Cato Institute, discusses how brinkmanship on the Korean peninsula could start a war nobody really wants, a first-hand account of deeply troubled Afghanistan, the introduction of US Abrams tanks after nine years of occupation and how corrupt Afghan police push ordinary civilians toward the insurgency.

MP3 here. (19:47)

Doug Bandow is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, specializing in foreign policy and civil liberties. He worked as special assistant to President Reagan and editor of the political magazine Inquiry. He writes regularly for leading publications such as Fortune magazine, National Interest, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Times. Bandow speaks frequently at academic conferences, on college campuses, and to business groups. Bandow has been a regular commentator on ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox News Channel, and MSNBC. He holds a J.D. from Stanford University.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_01_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the theory that WikiLeaks is carrying out the agenda of a foreign power, the State Department engaging in CIA-style espionage, the US/Israeli 5-part plan for regime change in Iran and why Bradley Manning‘s (alleged) exposure of government-gone-wild is laudable but should be prosecuted.

MP3 here. (18:05)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_01_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses how WikiLeaks badly underestimated the mainstream media’s ability to filter out material damaging to government, the Russian debunking of the US theory that Iran got advanced ballistic missiles from N. Korea, the New York Times’ leading role in spreading anti-Iran propaganda and how omissions within the Pentagon’s Afghanistan progress report indicate the insurgency’s growing strength.

MP3 here. (18:02)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.