Scott Horton Interviews Nick Turse

Scott Horton, January 13, 2011

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Nick Turse, author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives and editor of The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan, discusses his research that shows the Pentagon has over 1000 foreign bases – taking care to exclude the golf courses, resort hotels and family housing from the final count; the 88 bases (at least) remaining in Iraq that comprise lots of facts on the ground impeding the SOFA-agreed 2011 “for real” withdrawal deadline; inferring the presence of secret bases from discrepancies between troop deployments and the Pentagon’s official list of bases; and how Africa’s recent colonial history makes it difficult to headquarter AFRICOM on the continent.

MP3 here. (21:50)

Nick Turse is an historian, journalist, essayist and the associate editor and research director of the Nation Institute’s Tomdispatch.com. He is the editor of The Case for Withdrawal From Afghanistan and author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives. He has written for a wide variety of publications on subjects ranging from street art to war crimes.

One Response to “Nick Turse”

  1. I think shutting down these bases would be one of the easiest ways to get our deficit under control. By bringing our troops home, we protect them, us, and save a whole bunch of money. I know some would say this is naïve. But providing japan’s or germany’s defense is not a vital national interest for us. They are wealthy. Let them defend themselves. We have to decide if we want to be a economic and military powerhouse at peace or an overstretched, and broke empire. That is our real choice.

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