Cole Miller

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_25_kpfk_miller.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of February 25th. The original is available here.

Cole Miller, Founding Director of No More Victims, discusses his organization’s work, facilitating specialized medical care for child victims of the US war in Iraq; building profiles of the children, complete with back-stories and videos, to show Americans the real people behind impersonal casualty numbers; and the work-in-progress documentary about Iraqi casualties in Fallujah and the regretful US marines who participated in the assaults.

MP3 here. (15:51)

Cole Miller is the Founding Director of No More Victims. A freelance writer, Miller co-created and produced the environmentally focused radio series Isla Earth, which took top honors in the News Bureau category of the 2008 Los Angeles Press Club’s 50th Annual Journalism Awards. Miller travels frequently to the Middle East, and manages the day-to-day operations of NMV. He has appeared on CNN, ABC, CBS, NBC, Al Jazeera, and his work has been profiled by People Magazine and many other publications.

Maya Berry

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_25_kpfk_berry.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of February 25th. The original is available here.

Maya Berry of the Arab American Institute discusses the March 2nd briefing for congressional staffers, “Islamophobia: A Challenge to American Pluralism,” designed as a counterpoint to Rep. Peter King’s hearings on Muslim “radicalization;” the very lucrative business – the new “Red Scare” – of whipping up fear of Muslims; and the knee-jerk response of many Americans to scary sounding Arabic words they don’t know the meaning of.

MP3 here. (10:56)

Maya Berry works for the Arab American Institute.

Ahmed al-Assy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_25_al-assy.mp3]

Ahmed al-Assy, an Egyptian-American living in Egypt and a participant in the Tahrir Square protests, discusses how exiled president Hosni Mubarak may still be calling the shots in Egypt; the oligarchy-friendly Egyptian constitution that hinders democratic reforms; the difference between the regular army and the security forces within the Ministry of Interior; protesters in Tahrir Square and other areas, staying for the duration; and the Egyptian activists trying to keep the Gaza border crossing permanently open.

MP3 here. (20:32)

Ahmed al-Assy is an Egyptian American who has lived in Egypt for the last 10 years. He was a participant in the Tahrir Square protests.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_25_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses his article, “Too Late! The Government Already Did Do Something” at lewrockwell.com; how government-imposed wage and price controls lead to shortages and eventually black markets; the producer pricing pressures that are overlooked when limits are set on the price of finished consumer goods; and Ludwig von Mises’s reminder to keep the monetary system out of government hands.

MP3 here. (20:30)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_25_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses Jane Harman’s resignation from Congress, amid speculation that more information on her AIPAC dealings will soon emerge; how Harman and Alberto Gonzalez avoided legal and professional sanction but suffered damaged reputations nonetheless; the down-the-memory-hole scandals of Niger uranium forgeries and the Office of Special Plans; why the juicy tidbits revealed in Steve Rosen’s dismissed lawsuit should be enough for a multi-count indictment of AIPAC; and the uber-class of people so far beyond the rule of law, they can never be held to account.

MP3 here. (20:55)

Grant F. Smith is the author of Spy Trade: How Israel’s Lobby Undermines America’s Economy, America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government and Foreign Agents: The American Israel Public Affairs Committee from the 1963 Fulbright Hearings to the 2005 Espionage Scandal. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Angela Keaton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_21_keaton.mp3]

Angela Keaton, Antiwar.com Development Director and Antiwar Radio producer, discusses the importance of modest individual donations during Antiwar.com’s fund drive, and our empty roster of billionaire donors (and their accompanying agendas).

MP3 here. (8:24)

Angela Keaton is Development Director at Antiwar.com and the producer of Antiwar Radio. She can be reached by email at angela@antiwar.com or by phone at 323-512-7095.

Jeremy Sapienza

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_24_sapienza.mp3]

Jeremy Sapienza, Senior Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses his nine year tenure at Antiwar.com; his shared responsibility for choosing the pieces that get published in the viewpoints section; and the fallacies and stylistic shortcomings that get unsolicited submissions thrown in the junk pile.

MP3 here. (17:58)

Jeremy Sapienza is Assistant Webmaster and Senior Editor at Antiwar.com.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_23_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses how your donations keep him working, providing helpful and time saving news summaries, links and analysis to keep you informed on US foreign policy; Egypt’s partial reopening of the Gaza border crossing, kept closed since Hamas’s 2006 electoral victory; the midpoint (geographically speaking) of Libya’s popular revolution; why foreign military intervention on behalf of the protesters sounds like a good idea, but isn’t; and why the Saudi royal family is keenly interested in preventing a successful revolution in Bahrain.

MP3 here. (19:56)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers across the country.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_24_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses why Congress and the White House won’t be able to resist the temptation of military intervention in Libya and Saudi Arabia (should the uprisings spread there); how the US exports inflation, since commodities are priced in dollars; Ben Bernanke’s opinion that central banks are always the solution to, not the cause of, the world’s economic problems; the dollar’s devaluation reflected in the price of gold; and why, legalized or not, competing currencies will be used in times of economic collapse.

MP3 here. (13:43)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and Freedom Under Siege. His archived columns for Antiwar.com are here.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_24_wheeler.mp3]

Marcy Wheeler, blogging under the pseudonym “emptywheel” at firedoglake.com, discusses the mysterious case of CIA officer Raymond Davis and the shootings in Pakistan, doubts about his robbery story, the Obama administration’s clumsy response and their legal gymnastics in trying to arrange for diplomatic immunity to be applied and the agent released, the Pakistani public’s outrage over the incident and the large-scale covert war being waged there.

MP3 here. (18:38)

Marcy Wheeler, aka emptywheel, blogs at firedoglake.com. Marcy grew up bicoastally, starting with every town in NY with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, CA, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal.  Since then, she has lived in Western MA, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, and finally–for the last 12 years–Ann Arbor.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to MI; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton”–a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging.

Greg Mitchell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_23_mitchell.mp3]

Greg Mitchell, author of the Media Fix blog for TheNation.com, discusses the newest released WikiLeaks documents on his 88th day of nonstop blogging, including Mariah Carey’s million dollar performance for Muammar Gaddafi’s son in 2009; the State Department cables that explain why there is no US ambassador in Libya at present; the friendly relationship between Hugo Chavez and Gaddafi; and the huge boost to Al Jazeera’s credibility (and probably ratings) thanks to their excellent coverage of Middle East uprisings.

MP3 here. (20:38)

Greg Mitchell was the longtime editor of Editor & Publisher. He now writes the Media Fix blog for TheNation.com and maintains a Twitter feed. He is the author of Hiroshima in America, So Wrong for So Long: How the Press, the Pundits–and the President–Failed on Iraq and Why Obama Won: The Making of a President 2008. His newest book is The Age of WikiLeaks: From Collateral Murder to Cablegate (and Beyond).

Michael Hastings

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_22_hastings.mp3]

Journalist Michael Hastings, winner of the George Polk Award for his article “The Runaway General” in Rolling Stone magazine, discusses rumors that the military is pushing for 20 thousand troops to remain in Iraq beyond the December 2011 withdrawal deadline; the modest expectations for the July troop drawdown in Afghanistan; a preview of his next Rolling Stone article about generals spinning the Afghan War; and the starkly different accounts given by Hamid Karzai and Gen. Petraeus of an incident involving Afghan civilian casualties.

MP3 here. (11:00)

Michael Hastings is the author of I Lost My Love in Baghdad: A Modern War Story. In 2008, he covered the U.S. presidential elections for Newsweek, and before that he was the magazine’s Baghdad correspondent. His articles have appeared in GQ, Slate, Salon, Foreign Policy, the LA Times, and other publications. His blog The Hastings Report focuses on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and other foreign policy topics.

Kevin Zeese

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_23_zeese.mp3]

Kevin Zeese, Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace, discusses the newly launched Bradley Manning advocacy fund, that exists to counter the smearing of Manning in mainstream media; why he should be released on bail while awaiting trial; the foundations of democracy – consent of the governed and an informed citizenry – that Manning claimed were his motivations for leaking documents, if Wired‘s chat logs are to be believed; and why the outcome of his trial can only benefit the cause of press freedom, since he’ll be a hero if acquitted and a martyr if convicted.

MP3 here. (18:24)

Kevin Zeese  is the Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace. He also served as the Executive Director of Democracy Rising, is an attorney, and a long term peace advocate. He took a leave from VotersForPeace for most of 2006 while he was running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland. Zeese was a founding member of the Montgomery County Coalition Against the War in Maryland and has worked with various non-profit organizations on peace, justice, and democracy issues since 1978.

Stephen Webster

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_22_webster.mp3]

Stephen Webster, Senior Editor at RawStory.com, discusses why Libyan leader Muammer Gaddafi will either be deposed or killed within the next several days; the spectacle of Gaddafi’s incoherent, angry and bizarre speech; how the New York Times agreed – yet again – to withhold information at the White House’s request, this time about accused murderer Raymond Davis‘s CIA employment; how US demands for Davis’s release could lead to a popular uprising in Pakistan or war; and Iran’s provocative – but hardly threatening – naval transit through the Suez Canal.

MP3 here. (22:36)

Stephen C. Webster is Senior Editor at RawStory.com

Matt Barganier

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_22_barganier.mp3]

Antiwar.com editor Matt Barganier discusses his job scouring the media for the most important news and views; reading the New York Times and Washington Post so you don’t have to; tips and encouragement for those trying to submit articles for publishing; and why it’s better to admit ignorance than claim omniscience like certain media “experts” who are always wrong.

MP3 here. (18:23)

Matt Barganier is the editor of Antiwar.com.

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_22_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses the opportunity to try George W. Bush for his war crimes; the equally solid case against Condi Rice and the Office of Legal Council lawyers; the Obama administration’s blindness to government crimes committed in the past; the heartening sight of tyrannical governments under pressure all over the Middle East; protesters in Libya daring to face down their military’s overwhelming firepower; and why MSNBC’s Chris Matthews is a bad journalist.

MP3 here. (20:42)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_21_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the end of whatever small chance there was of closing Guantanamo, though half the prisoners are cleared for release; the Obama administration’s continued moratorium on releasing Yemeni prisoners, based on political pressure dating from the 2009 Christmas Day attempted bombing; why the material support statute should give everyone pause, even those who don’t care about the plight of Guantanamo prisoners; and how the current SCOTUS composition (eight members when Elena Kagan recuses herself) guarantees gridlock on Guantanamo decisions, which will allow conservative circuit court judges to decide the law – not that Obama cares.

MP3 here. (19:23)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

Rashid Khalidi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_21_khalidi.mp3]

Rashid Khalidi, author and professor of Middle East history and politics, discusses the spectacle of protesters from Morocco to Malaysia echoing the leaders of the American Revolution; how genuine reformist movements in Iran are undermined by US support; the endgame of US Mideast policy, where despotic client regimes were nurtured in the name of regional stability; the bravery of Libyan protesters who knew full well their government’s willingness and ability to use violence against them; the obvious deficiencies of US mainstream media coverage when compared to other sources; and the TV talking heads – who have no real knowledge of the Mideast – dutifully ignoring the actual events and whipping up fears of Islamic global domination.

MP3 here. (18:54)

Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University, received his BA from Yale in 1970, and his D.Phil. from Oxford in 1974.  He is editor of the Journal of Palestine Studies, and was President of the Middle East Studies Association, and an advisor to the Palestinian delegation to the Madrid and Washington Arab-Israeli peace negotiations from October 1991 until June 1993.

He is author of Sowing Crisis: American Dominance and the Cold War in the Middle East (2009); The Iron Cage: The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood (2006); Resurrecting Empire: Western Footprints and America’s Perilous Path in the Middle East (2004); Palestinian Identity: The Construction of Modern National Consciousness (1996); Under Siege: PLO Decision-Making During the 1982 War (1986); and British Policy Towards Syria and Palestine, 1906-1914 (1980), and was the co-editor of Palestine and the Gulf (1982) and The Origins of Arab Nationalism (1991).

Jonathan Landay

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_21_landay.mp3]

Jonathan S. Landay, national security and intelligence correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers, discusses the developments in Libya, where the state is losing control and increasing violence against protesters; how the government’s use of foreign mercenaries shows their loss of control over the regular army and security forces; the re-taking of Bahrain’s own “Tahrir” Square and how the massacre of protesters radicalized the demands of reformers; why every monarch and despot in the Mideast – and beyond – isn’t sleeping well;  and how it’s hard to imagine a looming Islamic caliphate while the protesters only demand freedom and democracy.

MP3 here. (10:06)

Jonathan S. Landay, national security and intelligence correspondent, has written about foreign affairs and U.S. defense, intelligence and foreign policies for 15 years. From 1985-94, he covered South Asia and the Balkans for United Press International and then the Christian Science Monitor. He moved to Washington in December 1994 to cover defense and foreign affairs for the Christian Science Monitor and joined Knight Ridder in October 1999.

He speaks frequently on national security matters, particularly the Balkans. In 2005, he was part of a team that won a National Headliners Award for “How the Bush Administration Went to War in Iraq.” He also won a 2005 Award of Distinction from the Medill School of Journalism for “Iraqi exiles fed exaggerated tips to news media.”

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_21_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses the connection between Federal Reserve monetary policy and increased food prices around the world; the unprecedented scope of US empire (and the correspondingly large payroll); the Jeffersonian, rather than jihadist, nature of protests in Egypt and beyond; the future of militarist oligarchic government, previewed in Madison, Wisconsin; and why all government unions should be abolished, starting with the police.

MP3 here. (18:56)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse. Archives of his Pro Libertate Radio show on the Liberty News Radio Network can be found here.

Michelle Richardson

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_18_richardson.mp3]

Michelle Richardson, Legislative Counsel for the ACLU’s Washington Legislative Office, discusses the status of various PATRIOT Act provisions due to expire; marginal but increasing Congressional opposition to the PATRIOT Act, much of it from GOP freshmen; why the worst civil liberties violating provisions – the “library act” and National Security Letters – should be ended immediately; evidence that the FBI is infiltrating and spying on domestic political activists in the guise of fighting terrorism; and why we should expect legislation requiring government-accessible “backdoors” in internet infrastructure.

MP3 here. (10:07)

Michelle Richardson is a Legislative Counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington Legislative Office, where she lobbies on national security issues. Before joining the ACLU, Michelle was counsel to then-Ranking Member John Conyers, Jr., and the House Judiciary Committee, where she specialized in national security issues, election reform, constitutional law and government oversight.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_18_porter.mp3]

Please excuse the technical difficulties that cut this interview a bit short. Gareth Porter’s article can explain any partially-answered questions.

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses US frustration with the Taliban’s highly effective IED attacks, which led to a change in strategy from house-to-house clearing to razing entire villages with airstrikes and bulldozers; problems with the official story, that Tarok Kalache residents abandoned their booby-trapped village long before US attacks started; and why razing a village is not a clear-cut war crime when it is “fortified” – a claim the US often made in Vietnam.

MP3 here. (14:47)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Angela Keaton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_18_keaton.mp3]

Angela Keaton, Antiwar.com Development Director and Antiwar Radio producer, discusses the quarterly fund drive and reminds us how Antiwar.com remains vigilant 24/7 on the depredations of the state, especially its foreign policy. Individual donations average 45 dollars, so every little bit helps. Antiwar.com accepts credit cards, Paypal, XIPWIRE, old cars, gold, silver and, apparently, goats?!

MP3 here. (8:05)

Angela Keaton is Development Director at Antiwar.com and the producer of Antiwar Radio. She can be reached by email at angela@antiwar.com or by phone at 323-512-7095.

Jason Leopold

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_17_leopold.mp3]

Jason Leopold, investigative reporter and Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout, discusses his interview with former Guantanamo detainee David Hicks; the deleterious effects of torture on victims, guards, writers and readers; Hicks’ soul-searching youth, conversion to Islam, and journey to Afghanistan; how Australian Prime Minister John Howard enlisted Dick Cheney’s help in getting a military commission indictment against Hicks, to help his reelection bid; and why a nine month plea deal isn’t the kind of sentence you’d expect for the “worst of the worst.”

MP3 here. (28:38)

Jason Leopold is an investigative reporter and the Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout. His in-depth coverage includes the US Attorney firing scandal, the leak of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilsion and the Bush administration’s torture program. He is a two-time winner of the Project Censored award for his investigative work on Halliburton and Enron, and in March 2008, was awarded the Thomas Jefferson award by The Military Religious Freedom Foundation for a series of stories on the rise of Christian fundamentalism in the US military.

Leopold also received the Dow Jones Newswires Journalist of the Year Award in 2001 for his reporting on Enron and the California energy crisis. He has worked as an editor and reporter at the Los Angeles Times and was Los Angeles bureau chief of Dow Jones Newswires. He is the author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, News Junkie, a memoir.

Gregory Johnsen

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_17_johnsen.mp3]

Gregory Johnsen, blogger and former Fulbright Fellow in Yemen, discusses Yemen’s history and factional differences, blowback from U.S. military action, the economic hardships which are the primary motivation of the protests, the likelihood that Saleh could fall, how US aid to Yemen helps the government fight their enemies, rather than al Qaeda, the attempted attack of Christmas 2009 and what U.S. policy in Yemen should be.

MP3 here. (22:37)

Gregory Johnsen, a former Fulbright Fellow in Yemen, is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. Johnsen has written for a variety of publications on Yemen including, among others, Foreign Policy, The American Interest, The Independent, The Boston Globe, and The National. He is the co-founder of Waq al-Waq: Islam and Insurgency in Yemen Blog. In 2009, he was a member of the USAID’s conflict assessment team for Yemen.

Joe Lauria

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_18_lauria.mp3]

Independent investigative journalist Joe Lauria discusses – live from Cairo – the throng of Egyptians re-filling Tahrir Square in celebration of Hosni Mubarak’s resignation; how Egypt’s constitutional reforms could be an early source of division among the protesters; the duplicitous post-WWII US foreign policy of supporting dictators while talking about “exporting democracy;” how Egypt’s broad-based and peaceful revolution undermines the terrorism and religious extremism of al-Qaeda; and how the protests in Bahrain put the Obama administration in a bind: whether to support a brutal monarchy or give up a crucial naval base.

MP3 here. (29:25)

Joe Lauria is a New York-based independent investigative journalist. A freelance member of the Sunday Times of London Insight team, he has also worked on investigations for the Boston Globe and Bloomberg News. Joe’s articles have additionally appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Mail, The Guardian, The Montreal Gazette, The Johannesburg Star, The Washington Times, New York Magazine, ARTnews and other publications.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_18_kpfk_morrow.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of February 18th. The original is available here.

Adam Morrow, journalist with IPS News, discusses Egypt’s incredible, broad-based, non-“ism” (except nationalism), peaceful revolution; the endurance of Egypt’s decades-long Emergency Law and the many remaining Mubarak-appointed government ministers; the unheeded demands of protesters to release all political prisoners; the lack of women or Coptic Christians on the panel convened to revise the constitution; and how the protests exposed the true loyalties of Egypt’s supposed “opposition” parties.

MP3 here. (20:22)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_15_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the importance of National Intelligence Estimates in determining US foreign policy and war-making abilities; how the Afghanistan NIE allows the military to measure their own success, leaving out a CIA assessment of the supposedly diminishing numbers of Taliban; debunking the military’s “taking the fight to the enemy” explanation for increased attacks; Gen. McChrystal’s well-reasoned “insurgent math;” and why Gen. Petraeus is more concerned with his public image than any particular military strategy, including COIN.

MP3 here. (20:26)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_17_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, member of Veterans For Peace and former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses his brief, nonviolent protest during Hillary Clinton’s GWU speech about US support for protesters and free speech in Egypt and Iran; McGovern’s violent removal and arrest by uniformed and plainclothes security that left him bruised and bloodied; and how Clinton didn’t even pause during the disruption to contemplate the incredible hypocrisy of her smug lecture to those awful undemocratic Mideast governments.

MP3 here. (10:26)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_15_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses Egypt’s faux revolution, where there’s still a military dictatorship but no longer a pretense of civilian authority (Mubarak wore a suit, not a uniform); how the US refusal to deal with political centrists (like Muslim Brotherhood) enables radical parties to come to the fore; and the criminal charges against former Pakistani president Musharraf that remind us of the still unsolved mystery of who really killed Benazir Bhutto.

MP3 here. (19:52)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Ivan Eland

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_14_eland.mp3]

Ivan Eland, Senior Fellow at The Independent Institute and regular contributor to Antiwar.com, discusses the historical revisionists coming out of the woodwork for Ronald Reagan’s 100 birthday; Reagan’s overrated presidency, from foreign policy to the economy; why the Soviet collapse had more to do with a failed economic model than provocative US policy; how Iran Contra dealt a huge blow to Constitutional checks and balances, with the Executive branch doing an end-run around Congress and the Boland Amendment to secretly fund the Nicaraguan Contras; the persistence of Reagan’s “fake” tax cut model (cutting taxes without cutting spending simply hides the costs of government) evident in Dick Cheney’s “deficits don’t matter” mantra; why a better Cold War strategy would have been to let the USSR run amok in the empire-killing money pits of South and Central Asia and Latin America; and the Pentagon’s conflict of interest in making threat assessments (why would they ever not find one?)

MP3 here. (19:41)

Ivan Eland is Senior Fellow at the The Independent Institute and a regular Antiwar.com columnist. He is the author of Recarving Rushmore: Ranking the Presidents on Peace, Prosperity, and Liberty, The Empire Has No Clothes: U.S. Foreign Policy Exposed, Partitioning for Peace: An Exit Strategy for Iraq and Putting “Defense” Back into U.S. Defense Policy: Rethinking U.S. Security in the Post-Cold War World.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_14_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the Egyptian army’s assertion of power, and not all in a good way; protesters split on living under martial law for the near future; uncertain prospects for democratic representation, as the military may run their own candidate in elections (if there are any); Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi’s improbable conversion from super-villain to lukewarm US ally; and the popular uprisings brewing in Algeria, Jordan, Yemen and Bahrain.

MP3 here. (21:49)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers across the country.

Samer Muscati

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_11_muscati.mp3]

Samer Muscati, Iraq and UAE researcher for Human Rights Watch, discusses the rampant torture of prisoners in Iraqi prisons; how Prime Minister Maliki effectively runs the entire government’s security apparatus, while vacancies remain in the important ministries of defense, national security and the interior; the continuity of torture from Saddam Hussein, to US and British occupation forces, to sectarian militias, and now Maliki’s government; and Iraq’s significant oil revenues that are squandered or stolen instead of being spent on crucial public services.

MP3 here. (19:44)

Samer Muscati is a professional photographer and works as the Iraq and UAE researcher for Human Rights Watch.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_11_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses why the Egyptian revolution is good for everyone, even Israelis; how the Egyptian army’s refusal to fire on demonstrators finally convinced Mubarak to step down; the broad American support for Egypt’s protesters, who happen to look like us and profess to want the same things; competition for loot and power within the remnants of Egypt’s ruling class; and the sorry state of leadership in the American Conservative movement.

MP3 here. (19:37)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_10_wheeler.mp3]

Marcy Wheeler, blogging under the pseudonym “emptywheel” at firedoglake.com, discusses the 44 thousand emails the hacker group “Anonymous” procured from private security firm HB Gary Federal, in retaliation for being “outed;” the three security firms (HB Gary, Palantir, and Berico Technologies) that submitted proposals (indirectly) to Bank of America for solving their WikiLeaks problem through a disinformation and smear campaign against WikiLeaks supporters like Glenn Greenwald and David House; how the Department of Justice referred BofA to law firm Hunton & Williams – which then solicited the security firms’ bid and gave BofA plausible deniability; the same three security firms’ work with the Chamber of Commerce to infiltrate and discredit opposition groups including unions; why we should be suspicious of security companies that work as defense contractors and for corporations in the private sector; and how the CIA deals with employees who torture: promotion!

MP3 here. (19:48)

Marcy Wheeler, aka emptywheel, blogs at firedoglake.com. Marcy grew up bicoastally, starting with every town in NY with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, CA, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal.  Since then, she has lived in Western MA, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, and finally–for the last 12 years–Ann Arbor.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to MI; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton”–a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_09_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses the declassified FBI document that details Israeli infiltration of Pennsylvania’s NUMEC nuclear plant in the 1960s; how NUMEC’s “abnormal” losses of nuclear material were in fact diversions of highly enriched uranium to Israel’s nuclear weapons program; the renewed (and increasingly effective) effort to free Jonathan Pollard, even though the scope and damage of his spy ring remains shrouded in mystery; how US aid to Israel violates the Symington Amendment; and why we should know the identity of “Mega” in 43 years or less.

MP3 here. (20:12)

Grant F. Smith is the author of Spy Trade: How Israel’s Lobby Undermines America’s Economy, America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government and Foreign Agents: The American Israel Public Affairs Committee from the 1963 Fulbright Hearings to the 2005 Espionage Scandal. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Noah Shachtman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_10_shachtman.mp3]

Noah Shachtman, editor of WIRED magazine’s Danger Room blog, discusses the doubling of air strikes in Afghanistan this year; wartime images that more often come from a soldier’s YouTube video than from the media; how Gen. McChrystal took Gen. Petraeus’s COIN doctrine far more seriously than Petraeus himself did; and why Obama’s July 2011 Afghanistan withdrawal date is a total fiction – nothing more than a talking point.

MP3 here. (10:32)

Noah Shachtman is a contributing editor at WIRED magazine, a non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution, and the editor of the Danger Room blog.

Kevin Zeese

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_09_zeese.mp3]

Kevin Zeese, Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace, discusses the collection of left-right antiwar essays in Come Home America and the prospect of a politically diverse movement against war and empire; how diverting money from military spending to civilian uses would boost the economy; the big three unifying issues: corporate welfare, empire, and the Bill of Rights; and how Rand Paul has dared to question the politically sensitive issue of US foreign aid, even advocating cutting off Israel from the US dole.

MP3 here. (19:42)

Kevin Zeese  is the Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace. He also served as the Executive Director of Democracy Rising, is an attorney, and a long term peace advocate. He took a leave from VotersForPeace for most of 2006 while he was running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland. Zeese was a founding member of the Montgomery County Coalition Against the War in Maryland and has worked with various non-profit organizations on peace, justice, and democracy issues since 1978.

Chris Hedges

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_10_hedges.mp3]

Chris Hedges, author of War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning, discusses the present state of affairs, best described as a convergence of the fictional dystopias in 1984 and Brave New World; the language of tyranny, ranging from soft seduction to overt threats, depending on the audience; how working class outrage is diverted away from the entrenched elite, and focused on scapegoats and fantastic conspiracies; the destruction and co-option of traditional Leftist institutions; and how federal debt is currently serviced by issuing more debt, a problem of sustainability that neither party will address.

MP3 here. (20:10)

Chris Hedges, whose column is published Mondays on Truthdig, is a senior fellow at The Nation Institute in New York City. He spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. He has reported from more than 50 countries and has worked for The Christian Science Monitor, National Public Radio, The Dallas Morning News and The New York Times, for which he was a foreign correspondent for 15 years.

Hedges was part of the team of reporters at The New York Times awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for the paper’s coverage of global terrorism. He also received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism in 2002. In 2009 the Los Angeles Press Club honored Hedges’ original columns in Truthdig by naming the author the Online Journalist of the Year and granting him the Best Online Column award for his Truthdig essay “Party to Murder,” about the December 2008-January 2009 Israeli assault on Gaza.

He has written nine books, including Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle, I Don’t Believe in Atheists and the best-selling American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War on America. His book War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_10_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses CIA chief Leon Panetta’s (correct) prediction that Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak will step down; the lack of concessions offered to Egyptian protesters, other than promises to end the 30-year Emergency Law at some unspecified future date; slow progress in reforming Tunisia’s government, despite a new head of state; and the Egyptian army’s two week detainment of the Google executive who helped start the protests.

MP3 here. (17:06)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers across the country.

Ahmed al-Assy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_11_kpfk_al-assy.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of February 11th. The original is available here.

Ahmed al-Assy, an Egyptian-American living in Egypt and a participant in the Tahrir Square protests, discusses Hosni Mubarak’s resignation and the making of history in Egypt; the under-reported protester casualties, as the government withheld bodies and hospitals refused to issue death certificates; and how Egyptians will continue to reject Omar Suleiman and any other replacement autocrats, and hold out for real democratic reform.

MP3 here. (15:42)

Ahmed al-Assy is an Egyptian American who has lived in Egypt for the last 10 years. He was a participant in the Tahrir Square protests.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_11_kpfk_escobar.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of February 11th. The original is available here.

Asia Times columnist Pepe Escobar discusses the Egyptian moment, a mash-up of the French Revolution and the Berlin Wall’s destruction; the Arab world’s reclaimed dignity, after humiliations in colonial and post-colonial times; and how culture and language barriers prevent the revolutionary spirit from spreading from the Mideast to the Central Asian “Stans,” despite the autocratic governments and Muslim populations common to both regions.

MP3 here. (9:17)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

An extreme traveler, Pepe’s nose for news has taken him to all parts of the globe. He was in Afghanistan and interviewed the military leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Masoud, a couple of weeks before his assassination. Two weeks before September 11, 2001, while Pepe was in the tribal areas of Pakistan, Asia Times Online published his prophetic piece, “Get Osama! Now! Or else …” Pepe was one of the first journalists to reach Kabul after the Taliban’s retreat, and more recently he has explored and reported from Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, US and China.

Tom Engelhardt

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_09_engelhardt.mp3]

Tom Engelhardt, creator of Tomdispatch.com and author of The American Way of War: How Bush’s Wars Became Obama’s, discusses why the Cold War only ended for the Soviets in 1991, as the lone remaining superpower traded the “peace dividend” for 20 years of economic and military unilateralism; Chase Madar’s impassioned mock opening statement for the defense of Bradley Manning, featured at Tomdispatch; the death knell sounding for Pax Americana and US exceptionalism, as client states come under siege and US influence wanes; and the self righteous media commentary on Afghan financial corruption, with few willing to concede similarities to the US system of unprecedented fraud and nonexistent prosecutions.

MP3 here. (18:09)

Tom Engelhardt created and runs the Tomdispatch.com website, a project of The Nation Institute where he is a Fellow. He is the author of a highly praised history of American triumphalism in the Cold War, The End of Victory Culture, and of a novel, The Last Days of Publishing, as well as a collection of his Tomdispatch interviews, Mission Unaccomplished. Each spring he is a Teaching Fellow at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. His newest book is The American Way of War: How Bush’s Wars Became Obama’s.

Mark Rumold

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_09_rumold.mp3]

Mark Rumold, the Open Government Legal Fellow at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, discusses the 40 thousand estimated FBI violations of laws, Executive Orders and other regulations committed during intelligence operations from 2001-2008; the post-Watergate origin of the Intelligence Oversight Board, and its severe curtailment during the Bush administration; Obama’s failure to change the government culture of arbitrary and excessive redaction of documents; and the encouraging (if probably temporary) bipartisan defeat of the PATRIOT Act’s reauthorization.

MP3 here. (16:56)

Mark is the Open Government Legal Fellow at EFF, where he works primarily on the FOIA Litigation for Accountable Government (FLAG) Project. His legal interests include the First Amendment, information privacy, and the ways technology can improve how we structure government. He received his law degree from Boalt Hall and his undergraduate degree from Northwestern University.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses his week long tour of Poland, home of a “black site” secret CIA prison, during which he tried to convince the Polish government to accept Guantanamo prisoners who can’t be released to their home countries (for fear of torture); the prison’s ignominious history as “a Soviet-era compound once used by German intelligence in World War II;” the difficulty in getting information from foreign governments complicit in the CIA’s rendition and torture program; how former US officials traveling abroad risk criminal indictments; and the secret CIA prison in Romania that remains…secret.

MP3 here. (24:20)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

Greg Mitchell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_mitchell.mp3]

Greg Mitchell, author of the Media Fix blog for TheNation.com, discusses Julian Assange’s extradition hearing and the possibility of a non-public trial in Sweden; Donald Rumsfeld’s 800 page defense of his legacy, where he expresses regret about “misstatements” rather than apologizing for lying us into war; how the WikiLeaks revelations have become so numerous that we need reminding of them already; and why delays in the promised Guantanamo prisoner files and bank documents could mean WikiLeaks is struggling to survive.

MP3 here. (20:10)

Greg Mitchell was the longtime editor of Editor & Publisher. He now writes the Media Fix blog for TheNation.com and maintains a Twitter feed. He is the author of Hiroshima in America, So Wrong for So Long: How the Press, the Pundits–and the President–Failed on Iraq and Why Obama Won: The Making of a President 2008. His newest book is The Age of WikiLeaks: From Collateral Murder to Cablegate (and Beyond).

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_11_morrow.mp3]

Adam Morrow, journalist with IPS News, discusses how Egyptian protesters remained peaceful despite scores of agent provocateurs inciting violence, attempting to discredit the demonstrations; crucial infrastructure in Tahrir Square (electrical, bathrooms) completed by volunteer professionals in hours, while it typically took the government years to respond to citizens’ needs; WikiLeaks documents that make the Egyptian government indistinguishable from Israel on Gaza policy; protesters staying put in Tahrir Square, for fear of being bluffed out by fake concessions; the soon-to-be revealed skeletons of Egypt’s recent and distant past; rumors of government involvement in the Coptic church bombing that was blamed on al Qaeda – raising tensions between Christians and Muslims; how Mubarak’s resignation strikes a huge blow to US regional influence, and marks the loss of a crucial Israel ally; and why, if it can happen in Egypt, Jordan and the Palestinian Authority could well be next.

MP3 here. (28:55)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Jeff Stein

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_stein.mp3]

Jeff Stein, SpyTalk columnist for the Washington Post, discusses how Jane “Israeli Asset” Harman’s resignation from Congress will cost the CIA a staunch ally; the 2009 Harman wiretap scandal allegedly involving Haim Saban, Alberto Gonzales, Nancy Pelosi, warrantless wiretapping and the House Intelligence Committee chairmanship; how Harman’s flippant “foot race challenge” to Stein turned the scandal into a sideshow that quickly disappeared from media coverage; and why a news story unflattering to AIPAC isn’t likely to get traction in US media.

MP3 here. (12:43)

SpyTalk columnist Jeff Stein is a longtime investigative reporter specializing in U.S. intelligence, defense and foreign policy issues. An Army Intelligence case officer in Vietnam, Stein has authored three highly regarded books and has been a frequent contributor to periodicals ranging from Esquire,Vanity Fair, GQ and Playboy to The New Republic, The Nation and The Christian Science Monitor. He also appears frequently on television and radio as an analyst on national security issues. In the 1980s, he was deputy foreign editor at UPI.

Until late 2009 Stein worked at Congressional Quarterly, where he launched the online CQ/Homeland Security daily, served as National Security editor and created SpyTalk.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the 2002 Taliban reconciliation deal scuttled by the US, which refused to guarantee the safety of Taliban leaders returning from exile in Pakistan to participate in some sort of unity government; clear evidence that the Taliban’s willingness to provide “safe haven” for al-Qaeda has been exaggerated; how the Bush administration’s quick-fix Afghan plan allowed a quick transition to the preferred war in Iraq; and the Pakistani pressure brought to bear on Mullah Omar to continue the insurgency and resist US demands to hand over bin Laden.

MP3 here. (20:52)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_10_morrow.mp3]

Adam Morrow, journalist with IPS News, discusses the celebratory mood of protesters in Cairo just minutes before Mubarak’s speech, where he was expected to resign; the largest turnout for demonstrations yet, nearly 2 million Muslims and Coptic Christians united in revolt by some counts; the diversity of religious and political views represented at Tahrir Square – certainly nothing to indicate a Muslim fundamentalist uprising; and how, despite news coverage focused in Cairo, the protests are indeed nationwide.

MP3 here. (10:38)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_09_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses how Egypt is becoming yet another foreign policy humiliation for Obama; the Israeli government’s uncharacteristically sloppy PR on Egypt – rallying to support an unpopular Arab dictator; how the Obama administration is trying to walk a tightrope between acknowledging the human rights abuses in Egypt and ignoring the 40 or so years of US support for those same abuses; and why deposing the Egyptian government, relied on economically by almost everyone in the country, will require a broader revolution or the army’s support.

MP3 here. (20:10)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Chase Madar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_10_madar.mp3]

Chase Madar, member of the National Lawyers Guild, discusses his mock “Opening Statement for the Defense of Bradley Manning, Soldier and Patriot;” Manning’s disillusionment with US “democracy building” in Iraq, that amounted to repressing free speech and rounding up critics of government for detention and torture; a list of his alleged leaks, from the Collateral Murder video to the State Department “Cablegate,” that Americans have the right to know about; the obligation of soldiers to take action against inhumane treatment; the lack of evidence that Manning and Julian Assange have “blood on their hands;” and the long American tradition of patriotic whistleblowers from within the military.

MP3 here. (18:18)

Chase Madar is an attorney in New York and a member of the National Lawyers Guild. He writes for TomDispatch, the American Conservative magazine, Le Monde Diplomatique, and the London Review of Books.

Jacob Hornberger

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_hornberger.mp3]

Jacob Hornberger, founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses how Washington’s mixed messages on Egypt are exposing the US government’s preference for dictatorships over democracies when they suit policy goals; why the US isn’t quite ready to join Chile and other countries willing to look back and examine previous government misdeeds; and why abandoning empire doesn’t presage military defeat and economic ruin.

MP3 here. (17:43)

Jacob G. Hornberger is founder and president of The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is a regular writer for The Future of Freedom Foundation’s publication, Freedom Daily, and is a co-editor or contributor to the eight books that have been published by the Foundation.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_07_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses Hamid Karzai’s complaint about NATO reconstruction funds being re-routed around his notoriously corrupt regime; how the US uses the Afghan army’s size as a measure of progress, even though it’s comprised of fair-weather soldiers who desert early and often; comparing the costs of a large Afghan army with the country’s GDP (it isn’t remotely sustainable); how Iraq’s Nouri al-Maliki is acting as a one man government, where his official job titles allow him to staff his own cabinet; and how the Egyptian military dominates nearly all facets of the country’s economy.

MP3 here. (20:14)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers across the country.

Nick Hankoff

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_hankoff.mp3]

Nick Hankoff, member of Year of Youth and Young Americans for Liberty, discusses the YAL contingent attending the CPAC 2011 Conference February 10-12, in Washington DC; Donald Rumsfeld’s pending “Defender of the Constitution” award; and how young people can change the Conservative movement for the better, while arguing for a sensible foreign policy based on libertarian non-intervention.

MP3 here. (9:27)

Nick Hankoff is a member of Year of Youth and Young Americans for Liberty.

Robert Baer

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_07_baer.mp3]

Robert Baer, former Middle East CIA field officer and author of The Devil We Know: Dealing with the New Iranian Superpower, discusses why the Egyptian uprising is better characterized as a bread riot than a Twitter revolution; how Omar Suleiman abetted the US torture rendition program in Egypt – and not for fact-finding interrogations, but to extract false confessions to justify the Bush administration’s foreign policy; the huge flaws in the 9/11 Commission that make a clear account of facts impossible nearly a decade later; and why Gen. Petraeus is lying when he says measurable progress is being made in Afghanistan.

MP3 here. (19:24)

Robert Baer, a former Middle East CIA field officer, is TIME.com’s intelligence columnist and the author of See No Evil and, most recently, The Devil We Know: Dealing with the New Iranian Superpower.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_07_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses how George W. Bush’s travel plans to Switzerland may have been scuttled by the threat of his arrest for torture; why deposed dictators (and other war criminals) have fewer luxurious exile options nowadays; how European judges are much less likely than their American counterparts to let euphemisms cloud the definition of torture; and why we should look beyond waterboarding to determine the actual number (tens of thousands) of people tortured in the War on Terror.

MP3 here. (20:08)

The Other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_07_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses the heartening Egyptian fight for liberty and freedom from government oppression; why the real threat of global domination comes from the US empire, not some Islamic caliphate; how crop subsidies and Fed monetary policy contribute to food riots in the third world; the close cooperation of Egyptian Christians and Muslims in their mutual defense; and why, even if the US isn’t quite ready for revolution, economic imperatives may force the issue.

MP3 here. (21:02)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Juan Cole

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_04_kpfk_cole.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of February 4th. The original is available here.

Juan Cole, Professor of History, blogger and author of Engaging the Muslim World, discusses the ramped-up protests in Egypt following the military’s renewed protection against the goon squads and secret police; why Egypt’s conscript army would not likely cooperate with direct attacks on protesters; whether the protesters can hold out longer than Mubarak – who faces a domestic economic crisis and internal and external pressures to resign; Vice President Omar Suleiman’s solid anti-fundamentalist (and pro-torture) credentials; how US bribe money successfully kept Egypt out of Israel/Gaza/Lebanon conflicts for a generation; and why protests are most likely to succeed in non-oil producing states that can’t afford to bribe their citizens into quiescence.

MP3 here. (26:34)

Juan Cole is the author of Engaging the Muslim World. He is a Professor of History at the University of Michigan and writes the “Informed Comment” blog at Juancole.com.

Justin Elliott

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_04_elliott.mp3]

Justin Elliott, reporter for Salon.com, discusses the Mideast dictators – other than Mubarak – supported by the US; how, by looking at actual diplomatic relationships, one can conclude the US has no real interest in human rights or democracy, beyond rhetorically bludgeoning enemy states with them; Secretary of State Clinton’s failure to broach the abysmal human rights record of Turkmenistan during her visit; and the politician and pundit members of the Mubarak fan club.

MP3 here. (18:16)

Justin Elliott is a Salon.com reporter. His Twitter feed is here.

Kathleen Barry

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_04_barry.mp3]

Kathleen Barry, feminist activist and author of Unmaking War, Remaking Men, discusses the social forces at work in the military indoctrination process; how replacing the “self,” and notions of morality, with a “buddy system” of unrelenting devotion to comrades engenders disregard for human life and guarantees atrocities against enemies seen as sub-human; the artificial social construct of masculinity, used as a guarantor of patriarchy and military service; and why a purely defensive military, used as a global peacekeepking force, is both possible and desirable.

MP3 here. (19:59)

Kathleen Barry is a feminist activist, blogger and author of five books including Female Sexual Slavery, which launched an international movement against trafficking in human beings. She is also a sociologist and Professor Emerita. Her latest book is Unmaking War, Remaking Men.

Jane Hamsher

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_04_hamsher.mp3]

Jane Hamsher, founder and publisher of Firedoglake.com, discusses Bradley Manning’s mistreatment in military custody, where punitive restrictions are justified as “safety” measures necessary for mentally unstable prisoners – a practice reminiscent of Soviet gulags; how Wired’s infamous chat logs fail to make a Manning/Julian Assange connection – much to the disappointment of government prosecutors; the replacement of the Quantico Brig Commander who abused his authority by putting Manning on suicide watch as punishment; Manning’s excitement about the revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia; and how custody “preventive” measures can cause the mental health problems they supposedly guard against.

MP3 here. (18:07)

Jane Hamsher is the founder and publisher of Firedoglake.com, a leading progressive blog. Her work has also appeared on The Daily Beast, The Huffington Post, AlterNet, The Nation, and The American Prospect. She has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show, Al Jazeera, PBS, and the BBC. She is the author of the best-selling book Killer Instinct, and she has produced such films as “Natural Born Killers” and “Permanent Midnight.” Jane currently lives in Washington, D.C.

Lawrence Pintak

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_04_pintak.mp3]

Lawrence Pintak, the founding dean of The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University, discusses the Al Jazeera revolution in Arabic language media, breaking away from state propaganda and censorship; how Facebook and other social media are mostly the tools of youth, while older protesters in Egypt (and elsewhere) heavily rely on television – and thus Al Jazeera; how incessant Islamofascist fearmongers create the clash of civilizations they warn about; and Obama’s opportunity to take actions consistent with US rhetoric about promoting democracy abroad.

MP3 here. (18:26)

Lawrence Pintak is the founding dean of The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University. He is the author of The New Arab Journalist: Mission and Identity in a Time of Turmoil.

Lawrence is a veteran of more than 30 years in journalism and the media business on four continents who now writes and lectures on America’s relationship with the Muslim world, the role of the media in shaping global perceptions and government policy, the future of journalism in a digital/globalized world, and the responsibilities of reporters covering conflict and social injustice.

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_03_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses why opponents of state power are naturally against war; Murray Rothbard’s foreign policy litmus test for assessing devotion to liberty; the history of  left-libertarianism and the conceptual left-right political spectrum, from the post-French Revolution era onward; and why across-the-board deregulation is not a free market cure-all, especially while state privileges like bailouts, FDIC insurance and government guarantees remain in place.

MP3 here. (20:05)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_03_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, discusses why the trillion dollar military budget is the most deserving candidate for federal spending cuts; why the military’s aging weapons and vehicles, and the shrunken Air Force and Navy, should make us wonder where all the money is going; how an increase in interest rates would end the charade that US debt levels are sustainable; and some creative ideas on reducing the rolls of social security.

MP3 here. (22:03)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_03_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the cascading failures of US foreign policy in the Mideast; the preemptive measures being taken by US client states all over the region to ward off regime change: Jordan’s government sacked, Yemeni President Saleh foregoing reelection, and Kuwait increasing bribes to citizens; and how the Israel lobby and military-industrial complex erect huge barriers to changes in foreign policy, to the detriment of everyone else.

MP3 here. (18:22)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Stephen Webster

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_03_webster.mp3]

Stephen Webster, Senior Editor at RawStory.com, discusses the Egyptian Army’s wavering support for protesters, causing the crowds to thin significantly; Israel’s strong support for Mubarak – not the sort of endorsement typically sought by Arab leaders; how WikiLeaks documents, anonymous hackers and alternative communications have aided and perpetuated the budding Mideast revolutions; the pro-Mubarak goon squads beating journalists; and how Al Jazeera compares with Western mainstream media in terms of protest coverage.

MP3 here. (19:32)

Stephen C. Webster is Senior Editor at RawStory.com

Coleen Rowley

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_02_rowley.mp3]

Coleen Rowley, retired FBI agent and 9/11 whistleblower, discusses the cycle of intelligence sharing, from pre-9/11 inter-agency competitive secrecy, to post-9/11 information overload, and back to clamming up again (post-WikiLeaks); why, despite the greatly expanded national security state, the only successes in thwarting actual terrorism have come from vigilant bystanders; Sibel Edmonds’ incredible account of another FBI linguist’s meetings with a former SAVAK chief, where he steadfastly warned of an imminent attack by bin-Laden led Kamikaze pilots in major US cities in 2001; and the 9/11 Commission’s failure to mention any of this, or the three Qatari men conducting surveillance for the 9/11 hijackings – who, as revealed by WikiLeaks, are still being pursued by the FBI.

MP3 here. (29:03)

Coleen Rowley grew up in a small town in northeast Iowa. She obtained a B.A. degree in French from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa and then attended the College of Law at the University of Iowa. She graduated with honors in 1980 and passed the Iowa Bar Exam that summer.

In January of 1981, Ms. Rowley was appointed as a Special Agent with the FBI and initially served in the Omaha, Nebraska and Jackson, Mississippi Divisions. In 1984, she was assigned to the New York Office and for over six years worked on Italian-organized crime and Sicilian heroin drug investigations. During this time, Ms. Rowley also served three separate temporary duty assignments in the Paris, France Embassy and Montreal Consulate.

In 1990, Ms. Rowley was transferred to Minneapolis where she assumed the duties of Chief Division Counsel, which entailed oversight of the Freedom of Information, Forfeiture, Victim-Witness and Community Outreach Programs as well as providing regular legal and ethics training to FBI Agents of the Division and additional outside police training.

In May of 2002, Ms. Rowley brought several of the pre 9/11 lapses to light and testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee on some of the endemic problems facing the FBI and the intelligence community. Ms. Rowley’s memo to FBI Director Robert Mueller in connection with the Joint Intelligence Committee’s Inquiry led to a two-year-long Department of Justice Inspector General investigation. She was one of three whistleblowers chosen as Person of the Year by TIME magazine.

In April 2003, following an unsuccessful and highly criticized attempt to warn the Director and other administration officials about the dangers of launching the invasion of Iraq, Ms. Rowley stepped down from her (GS-14) legal position to resume her position as a (GS-13) FBI Special Agent. She retired from the FBI at the end of 2004 and now speaks publicly to various groups, ranging from school children to business/professional/civic groups, on two different topics: ethical decision-making and “balancing civil liberties with the need for effective investigation.”

Ms. Rowley authored a chapter in a book published in 2004 by the Milton Eisenhower Foundation entitled, Patriotism, Democracy and Common Sense: Restoring America’s Promise at Home and Abroad. She is also now an avid blogger on the Huffington Post.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_01_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the escalating tensions between the Somali police and army, stopping just short of violent conflict; the seven-year old “transitional” Somali government that remains as weak and unrepresentative as ever; Xe (formerly Blackwater USA) owner Erik Prince‘s involvement with a mercenary army tasked with fighting Somali pirates; indications the Tunisia protests are running out of steam; and Yemeni protests that seem to have effected (eventual) regime change.

MP3 here. (19:37)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers across the country.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_01_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses the US preference for new Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman as a successor for Mubarak; why the Egypt/1979 Iran comparisons fail despite the dire warnings of neoconservatives; the history of the Muslim Brotherhood, which is now dominated by moderates and old men; how Egyptians are disgraced by their government’s abandonment of the Palestinian cause; how the Palestine Papers lay bare the charade of “peace talks” and expose PA officials as stooges of the US and Israel; and how Turkey, not Tunisia, began the revolutionary push in the Mideast.

MP3 here. (28:04)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Kathleen Christison

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_01_christison.mp3]

Kathleen Christison, former CIA political analyst and author of Palestine in Pieces, discusses Al Jazeera’s coverage and analysis of the Palestine Papers; Israel’s “no thanks” response to the nearly unconditional surrender by PA negotiators; the end of a 2-state solution, with a fractured and helpless Palestine as the centerpiece; the shift of Israeli politics from Left to far Right in less than a generation; and the helpful US State Department advice to Israel after the Gaza “Operation Cast Lead” invasion: make better propaganda.

MP3 here. (17:35)

Kathleen Christison is a former CIA political analyst and the author of several books on the Palestinian situation, including Palestine in Pieces, co-authored with her late husband Bill Christison. She is a regular writer for Counterpunch.

Christopher Anders

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_01_anders.mp3]

Christopher Anders, senior legislative counsel in the ACLU’s Washington Legislative Office, discusses how the Obama administration’s minimal effort on closing Guantanamo has demoralized and discouraged Democrats willing to take political risks to make it happen; how the DOJ’s absolute certainty of convictions in terrorism cases casts doubt on the US “justice” system; the lack of trials for 9/11 defendants (except marginal players) despite nearly 10 years gone by; and the primary lesson learned from the Anwar al-Awlaki decision: courts are continuing to defer authority to Congress and the President.

MP3 here. (19:50)

Christopher E. Anders is the senior legislative counsel in the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington Legislative Office. He represents the ACLU in lobbying Congress and the executive branch on lesbian and gay rights, the faith-based initiative, conflicts between religious claims and civil rights, fair housing, oversight of federal civil rights enforcement, restoration of civil rights protections eroded by the courts, hate crimes and HIV/AIDS issues.