Jeremy Scahill

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_31_scahill.mp3]

Jeremy Scahill, author of Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army, discusses his article “The Dangerous US Game in Yemen; the in-country CIA and JSOC covert agents who might have to relocate for a while; how President Saleh’s alliance with Saudi Arabia against his Shiite minority could prompt Iran to take protective action of their coreligionists; Yemen’s impoverishment and many long-term economic problems; the post-9/11 ultimatum (similar to Musharraf’s) that convinced Saleh to cooperate with the US war on terror; the big bucks given to Saleh by Saudi Arabia and the US, supposedly for fighting Al Qaeda, that instead is used to kill his political rivals; Obama’s continuation of the Bush administration’s worst offenses; Jeremy taking Ed Schultz to task on MSNBC (to skip the sanctimonious monologue, go to the 10:00 mark); and the New Yorker’s account of the Libyan rebels – essentially 1000 trained soldiers fighting against a real army.

MP3 here. (16:25)

Jeremy Scahill, a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute, is the author of the bestselling Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army, published by Nation Books. He is an award-winning investigative journalist and correspondent for the national radio and TV program Democracy Now!. You can read his blog on TheNation.com here.

Noah Shachtman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_30_shachtman.mp3]

Noah Shachtman, editor of WIRED magazine’s Danger Room blog, discusses his article, “Anthrax Redux: Did the Feds Nab the Wrong Guy?” revisiting the FBI’s case against Bruce Ivins; the compelling circumstantial evidence despite the many crucial unknowns, such as motive and opportunity; FBI pressure brought to bear on Ivins and his family, leading to his seemingly-credible suicide (though no autopsy was performed); his coworkers’ near-unanimous opinion of his innocence; and how anthrax hysteria helped sell the case for war on Iraq.

MP3 here. (23:46)

Noah Shachtman is a contributing editor at WIRED magazine, a non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution, and the editor of the Danger Room blog.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_30_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses how (relatively) peaceful and quick Arab uprisings make Al Qaeda’s brand of violent revolution even less appealing; the slippery slope of interventions started with Libya, where there is no logical stopping point (why not Iran, Syria, Yemen, Bahrain, etc.); blaming Iran for all the popular uprisings against US-allied dictators; and efforts to reassert US influence in Egypt, especially regarding continued cooperation with Israel on Gaza.

MP3 here. (19:51)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Charles Featherstone

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_30_featherstone.mp3]

Charles Featherstone, regular writer at LewRockwell.com, discusses the “it’s all about oil” explanation for US foreign policy; why the US is even more concerned about Saudi Arabia’s fate than Israel’s; language in the UN Liyba resolution that seems to forbid ground troops, but doesn’t; the new “leader” of Libya’s rebels that spent the last 20 years in suburban Virginia, arousing suspicions that he’s a CIA asset; the warmongers hard at work figuring how to get the US involved in Syria and Iran; and how the “Arab Spring” marginalizes both Al Qaeda and Israel.

MP3 here. (19:38)

Charles H. Featherstone is a seminarian, essayist and songwriter currently living in Chicago. He writes regularly for LewRockwell.com.

Stephen M. Walt

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_29_walt.mp3]

Stephen M. Walt, professor of international affairs at Harvard University and co-author of The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy, discusses the liberal interventionists and neoconservatives uniting in support of war in Libya; how the mission to protect Libyan civilians almost immediately became a mandate for regime change – despite claims to the contrary; fighting a preventative war based on anticipated massacres and imagined regional repercussions; the risk of moral hazard, where any and all “rebel” groups can demand help and protection – a bailout, so to speak; and how the US government somehow got on the right side of history by sort-of backing the Egyptian protesters at the last minute, after decades of stabbing them in the back.

MP3 here. (20:07)

Stephen M. Walt is the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international affairs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, where he served as academic dean from 2002-2006. He previously taught at Princeton University and the University of Chicago, where he served as master of the social science collegiate division and deputy dean of social sciences.

He has been a resident associate of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace and a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, and he has also been a consultant for the Institute of Defense Analyses, the Center for Naval Analyses, and Singapore’s S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies.

Professor Walt is the author of Taming American Power: The Global Response to U.S. Primacy (W. W. Norton, 2005), and, with coauthor J.J. Mearsheimer, The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007).

He presently serves as faculty chair of the international security program at the Belfer Center for Science and international affairs and as co-chair of the editorial board of the journal International Security. He is also a member of the editorial boards of Foreign Policy, Security Studies, International Relations, and Journal of Cold War Studies, and co-editor of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs, published by Cornell University Press. He was elected as a fellow in the American academy of arts and sciences in May 2005.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_29_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses how the joint congressional testimony of Gen. Petraeus and Michele Flournoy betrays the Obama administration’s intent to stay in Afghanistan indefinitely; why a never-ending military presence greatly hinders negotiations with the Taliban; why pipeline politics remain a peripheral issue in US war-making decisions; the resilience of loyal Obama supporters who still see hope and change in this train wreck of a presidency; and how humanitarian interventions, whether successes or failures, empower the war-hawks.

MP3 here. (27:06)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_29_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, discusses the actual constitutional war-making powers of the president; why UN mandates do not override the sovereignty of national governments; the “imminent attack” exception to a congressional authorization of war (though somehow FDR found the time after Pearl Harbor to ask for and receive a formal declaration); why the US Constitution is better off in the junk yard than the repair shop; and the cynical American priorities responsible for shutting off the streetlights on Main Street before taking away a dime from the empire.

MP3 here. (19:53)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_28_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the lengthening Libya intervention from “days not weeks” to an open ended commitment with no end in sight – despite Robert Gates’s assertion that Libya poses no threat to the US; how the Bahrain issue has driven a (real or invented) wedge between the US and Saudi Arabia; Yemeni protests coming to a head and spelling the end of President Saleh’s rule; protests in Syria gaining enough momentum to possibly force the end to an emergency law in effect since 1963; and how French President Sarkozy competes with the impressive warmongering of the two Liebermans, Joe and Avigdor.

MP3 here. (27:43)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_28_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses the Council on Foreign Relations book Start-Up Nation: The Story of Israel’s Economic Miracle; the idea that the Israeli socialist Sparta makes an exemplary model for economic growth, where national conscription breeds cohesiveness and innovation; how the CFR conveniently ignores the transfer of military technology, industrial espionage and favorable trade agreements; and the divide within CFR between Israel-firsters and those devoted to more honest assessments, even when Israel looks bad because of them.

MP3 here. (18:42)

Grant F. Smith is the author of Spy Trade: How Israel’s Lobby Undermines America’s Economy, America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government and Foreign Agents: The American Israel Public Affairs Committee from the 1963 Fulbright Hearings to the 2005 Espionage Scandal. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Haroon Siddiqui

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_28_siddiqui.mp3]

Haroon Siddiqui, editorial writer for the Toronto Star, discusses the disparaging reference to Middle Eastern public opinion as “word from the Arab street;” how the scenes from Egypt’s revolution differed from the stereotypical images of Arabs imagined by Americans; the shaky foundations of countries invented by post-colonial European bureaucrats; why Arab monarchs are described as “moderates” because they cooperate with the US, not because they are remotely democratic; the large number of US-allied Arab League states that are either monarchies or autocracies; why people rebelling against repressive regimes (as in Libya) deserve protection, even though the US is not a reliable partner and frequently makes matter worse; and the obvious solution to problems in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

MP3 here. (25:13)

Haroon Siddiqui is the author of Being Muslim. He has worked for Canadian newspapers in various positions since 1968 and currently writes editorials for the Toronto Star.

Jason Leopold and Michael Kearns

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_25_kpfk_leopold_kearns.mp3]

This recording is from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of March 25th. The KPFK archive is here.

Investigative reporter Jason Leopold and retired Air Force Capt. Michael Kearns discuss the Truthout article “CIA Psychologist’s Notes Reveal True Purpose Behind Bush’s Torture Program;” how psychologically exploited prisoners were used to generate terror-war propaganda, make false confessions and “collaborate” with interrogators; how torture program architect Dr. Bruce Jessen “reverse engineered” defense-oriented SERE training programs to break down prisoners; Sen. Carl Levin’s incomplete torture investigation; and the creation of SERE during the Korean War to combat the mistreatment of US POW’s.

MP3 here. (27:57)

Michael Kearns, retired Air Force Capt., was a “master” SERE instructor and decorated veteran who held high-ranking positions within the Air Force Headquarters Staff and Department of Defense (DoD).

Jason Leopold is an investigative reporter and the Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout. His in-depth coverage includes the US Attorney firing scandal, the leak of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilsion and the Bush administration’s torture program. He is a two-time winner of the Project Censored award for his investigative work on Halliburton and Enron, and in March 2008, was awarded the Thomas Jefferson award by The Military Religious Freedom Foundation for a series of stories on the rise of Christian fundamentalism in the US military.

Leopold also received the Dow Jones Newswires Journalist of the Year Award in 2001 for his reporting on Enron and the California energy crisis. He has worked as an editor and reporter at the Los Angeles Times and was Los Angeles bureau chief of Dow Jones Newswires. He is the author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, News Junkie, a memoir.

 

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_25_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses “Obama’s Imperial Adventure” in Libya; the many Democrats and leftists falling over themselves to defend Obama; why the UN mandate to protect Libyan civilians isn’t possible with the supposedly limited “no-fly” zone; and why Congress couldn’t delegate war-making powers to the UN even if wanted to.

MP3 here. (17:42)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Jennifer Van Bergen

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_25_van-bergen.mp3]

Jennifer Van Bergen, a journalist, author and law lecturer, discusses the reasons why Guantanamo prisoners aren’t being tried in federal courts; how the Miranda warning – established by the Supreme Court to protect constitutional rights – has been eviscerated by Executive branch policy changes; why a parallel legal system for terrorism cases is not necessary; and how the “public safety” exception to Miranda provides all the flexibility needed to interrogate and prosecute terrorists.

MP3 here. (20:00)

Jennifer Van Bergen, a journalist with a law degree, is the author of The Twilight of Democracy: the Bush Plan for America. She writes frequently on civil liberties, human rights, and international law.

John V. Walsh

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_24_walsh.mp3]

John V. Walsh, frequent contributor to Counterpunch.org, discusses his article “Impeach Obama: A Challenge to Tea Partiers and Antiwar Liberals;” the two-party partisan trap that causes incessant infighting and diverts attention from the real problems; how Obama’s decision to militarily intervene in yet another Sunni Muslim country virtually guarantees more blowback; looking at the UN Libya vote in terms of the represented populations for and against intervention, which turns the 10-5 vote on its head; and how China’s foreign policy indicates the 21st century will be more about economics than warfare.

MP3 here. (23:42)

John V. Walsh is a scientist who lives in Cambridge, Mass. He is a frequent contributor to CounterPunch.org and Antiwar.com.

Barrett Brown

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_24_brown.mp3]

Barrett Brown, journalist and sometimes-spokesman for Anonymous, discusses the loosely affiliated hacker collective known as Anonymous; contributing to the revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt and beyond; the internet’s use as a tool of liberation and of repressive surveillance; the danger of private companies developing software (dubbed “Metal Gear” by Anonymous) to infiltrate and manipulate social networks – especially those used to aid popular revolutions; and how the anti-Ben Bernanke Anonymous campaign serves as a distraction from the group’s core mission.

MP3 here. (26:20)

Barrett Brown is a contributor to Vanity Fair, The Huffington Post, Skeptic, True Slant and The Onion. His work has appeared in dozens of other publications and outlets. He serves as director of communications for Enlighten the Vote, a political action committee dedicated to the advancement of the Establishment Clause. He is the author of Flock of Dodos: Behind Modern Creationism, Intelligent Design and the Easter Bunny and Hot, Fat & Clouded: The Amazing and Amusing Failures of America’s Chattering Class.

James Ridgeway

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_24_ridgeway.mp3]

James Ridgeway, Senior Washington Correspondent for Mother Jones, discusses the general detainment conditions in US prisons, in light of Bradley Manning’s mistreatment; the “Angola 3” prisoners held in solitary confinement for almost four decades; the forgotten Eighth Amendment to the Constitution; using solitary confinement as a baseline condition, rather than a temporary punitive measure; why prison culture is indicative of extreme American ignorance or just barbarism; and the few politicians willing to stick their necks out for indicted criminals, for little to no political gain.

MP3 here. (26:12)

James Ridgeway is Senior Washington Correspondent for Mother Jones, where he writes both articles for the magazine and a weekly web column on MotherJones.com. He also writes pieces for the Guardian and CounterPunch, and collaborates on original short videos.

Ridgeway served as Washington Correspondent for the Village Voice for more than thirty years, where he wrote the weekly “Mondo Washington” column, as well as features on national and international politics. As part of his broad-based national reporting, he became known for his writing on the American right wing, from the mainstream conservative movement to the racist far-right. He also reported on international stories, from the coup in Haiti to the democratic revolution in Eastern Europe.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_23_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses the “Naked Aggression Against Libya;” fighting for control of oil resources on behalf of the MIC and US empire; the triumvirate of women promoting and commanding the Libyan war effort; Egypt’s tough slog to freedom and liberty following Mubarak’s ouster; and how democracy, as applied to foreign countries, means little more than the freedom to vote for the candidate chosen by the US.

MP3 here. (18:17)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_23_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the UN war against Libya, where goals and exit strategies are uncertain; problems with an east/west division of Libya, assuming a prolonged stalemate; Obama’s curious bypassing of Congress, as the legislature generally approves of any military action; the seemingly unlimited US appetite for global intervention and budget deficits; and how official justifications for hypocritical foreign policies have been laid bare for all to see.

MP3 here. (19:43)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

George Donnelly

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_25_donnelly.mp3]

Libertarian activist George Donnelly discusses the libertarian online streaming video Agorist Unconference this weekend, March 25-27; working to establish a free market and alternate currencies outside the bounds of state control; and a sample of unconference speakers, ranging from whole milk farmers to pirate radio operators to New Hampshire free-staters. Scott Horton and Antiwar Radio producer Angela Keaton are also schedule to speak.

MP3 here. (19:51)

George Donnelly is a libertarian activist, radio host and blogger. He organized the We Won’t Fly campaign and the Agorist Unconference.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_22_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the “Two New OLC Opinions on Warrantless Surveillance;” the mysterious “program” of unspecified purpose related to NSA data mining; the (sometimes) conflicting legal opinions of OLC lawyers John Yoo and Jack Goldsmith; the NSA’s powerful surveillance algorithms; the differing Fourth Amendment protections for foreign and domestic communications; John Yoo’s willingness to trade preposterous legal opinions (much desired by the Bush administration to justify their criminal behavior) for high office; and Obama’s illegal and immoral war on Libya.

MP3 here. (18:36)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Ahmed al-Assy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_22_al-assy.mp3]

Ahmed al-Assy, an Egyptian-American living in Egypt and a participant in the Tahrir Square protests, discusses the solid turnout for Egypt’s constitutional referendum vote; their jumbled mess of a legal system, made from a hodgepodge of colonial remnants mixed with Sharia; misinformation and voter confusion about the actual issues on the ballot; replacing the old oppressive security state with a new one; and the latest Gaza excursion, where Ahmed and others will take building materials and raw goods to break the siege through Egypt’s border.

MP3 here. (17:52)

Ahmed al-Assy is an Egyptian American who has lived in Egypt for the last 10 years. He was a participant in the Tahrir Square protests.

Mike Malloy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_23_malloy.mp3]

Talk radio host Mike Malloy discusses the weekend protests at the White House and Quantico Marine brig, against the wars and in support of Bradley Manning; the onerous process of exercising First Amendment rights – there are “free speech zones” and for some reason permits are required; Mike’s arrested for criminal trespass while peacefully assembled on public property; and why war is fundamentally anti-human.

MP3 here. (18:24)

Mike Malloy was one of the original hosts on Air America Radio. In addition to writing and producing for CNN (1984-87) and CNN-International (2000), his professional experience includes newspaper columnist and editor, writer, rock concert producer and actor. He is the only radio talk show host in America to have received the A.I.R (Achievement in Radio) Award in both Chicago and New York City, the number three and number one radio markets in the country.

Mike’s nationally-syndicated program can now be heard weeknights from 9PM – midnight ET on affiliates from coast-to-coast, border to border, across the fruited plane; and on XM Satellite and Sirius Satellite Radio as well as on live Internet streaming.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_22_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses his article “Shock, Awe and Déjà Vu in Libya;” the self-inflicted political pressure on Sarkozy and Obama to force Gaddafi from power, lest they lose reelection themselves; why the West’s preferred successor will likely be chosen from London’s ample community of Libyan expatriates; the many questions left unanswered by hasty liberal interventionists; and the officers in AFRICOM who relish the chance to project power and win medals.

MP3 here. (19:24)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_22_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses Obama’s decision to get a UN Security Council declaration of war on Libya – and further marginalize Congress’s exclusive war-making authority; how the United Nations Participation Act, signed by President Truman in 1945, directly challenges the authority of the US Constitution; why the UN is less a peacekeeping organization than a means of consolidating power and applying it against enemies of the “international community;” why bilateral talks work better than UN diplomacy; the hierarchy of authority with regard to international treaties and domestic federal and state laws; and how broad-based legislation like the PATRIOT Act and TARP are quickly used in ways that far exceed their mandates.

MP3 here. (20:11)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Karen Kwiatkowski

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_22_kwiatkowski.mp3]

Karen Kwiatkowski, columnist at lewrockwell.com and retired USAF lieutenant colonel, discusses the Bush administration’s early Iraq War planning – well before they played up the WMD threat and sold the war to Americans; how the Office of Special Plans leaked classified information to cooperative journalists willing to press the case for war; the OSP’s dissolution soon after the war started – since its raison d’être was fulfilled; unpopular neocons who must attain power through appointed, rather than elected, government positions; and the ease-of-victory factor that explains why some wars are fought, and others aren’t.

Background articles on Karen Kwiatkowski’s interaction with Douglas Feith’s Office of Special Plans:

The new Pentagon papers

2006 CSPAN interview by Brian Lamb

Career Officer Does Eye-Opening Stint Inside Pentagon

The Lie Factory

MP3 here. (20:26)

Karen Kwiatkowski, Ph.D., is a retired USAF Lieutenant Colonel, who spent her final years in uniform working at the Pentagon’s Near East/South Asia bureau (NESA). Her assignment was to work on policy papers for the Secretary of Defense and other top brass at the Pentagon. Shortly thereafter, she was assigned to a newly-formed bureau inside the Pentagon called the Office of Special Plans, which was created to help the Pentagon deal with issues in Iraq.

Deeply frustrated and alarmed, Kwiatkowski, still on active duty, took the unusual step of penning an anonymous column of internal Pentagon dissent that was posted on the Internet by former Colonel David Hackworth, America’s most decorated veteran. She lives with her freedom-loving family in the Shenandoah Valley, and among other things, writes for lewrockwell.com.

Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_18_kpfk_vlahos.mp3]

This recording is from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of March 18th.

Kelley B. Vlahos, featured Antiwar.com columnist and contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine, discusses the toxic legacy left by the US in Iraq, particularly in Fallujah and Basra; the numerous and severe birth defects caused by some combination of depleted uranium, water pollution and burn pits; doctors advising women in Fallujah to avoid bearing children, due to the high likelihood of deformities and cancer; and Bush’s over-the-top, bloody minded pep talk to his military advisers prior to the 2004 Fallujah attack.

MP3 here. (26:05)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos has spent over a decade as a political reporter in Washington DC. Currently, she is a contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine and its daily weblog, @TAC. She is also a Washington correspondent for the DC-based homeland security magazine, Homeland Security Today, a long-time political writer for FOXNews.com, a regular columnist for Antiwar.com and a contributor to CriminalJustice.Change.org

Jesse Rosenfeld

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_18_rosenfeld.mp3]

Jesse Rosenfeld, a Canadian freelance journalist based in Ramallah and Tel Aviv, discusses why Israel doesn’t tolerate peaceful and democratic protests any more than armed resistance; the Palestinian grassroots movement for national identity and unity – in defiance of their corrupt leadership; Netanyahu’s warning that a Palestinian unity organization would kill the peace process; and the scarcity and unequal distribution of water in Israel and the occupied territories.

MP3 here. (18:12)

Jesse Rosenfeld is a Canadian freelance journalist based in Ramallah and Tel Aviv. He is an editor of www.thedailynuisance.com.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_18_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the tendency of UN Security Council resolutions to greatly exceed their initial mandates in both time and scope; the token military contributions of Qatar and UAE; the UN critics in Congress who have nothing disparaging to say about world government when war is approved; Saudi Arabia’s fake GCC “coalition of the willing” in Bahrain; how excessive government violence has prompted some Yemeni tribes to ally with the protesters; another deadly US drone strike missing the mark in North Waziristan; and the great divergence in Afghan War support between Congress and the public.

MP3 here. (18:37)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Juan Cole

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_18_cole.mp3]

Juan Cole, Professor of History, blogger and author of Engaging the Muslim World, discusses Gaddafi’s military offensive that began in earnest while outside forces were mobilizing against him; modeling intervention in Libya after the 2001 defeat of the Taliban, with US air support for Northern Alliance ground forces (and look how that turned out); why the no-fly zone is worth it to prevent massacres, like in Kosovo; why the terrorist Gaddafi can’t be allowed to stay in power, as he might invade Tunisia and destabilize the region; and the question: if Libya intervention is justified, then why are Bahrain and Yemen off limits?

MP3 here. (25:22)

Juan Cole is the author of Engaging the Muslim World. He is a Professor of History at the University of Michigan and writes the “Informed Comment” blog at Juancole.com.

Mike Gogulski

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_18_gogulski.mp3]

Mike Gogulski, founder of the Bradley Manning Support Network, discusses the myriad events going on this weekend (March 19-20) in support of Bradley Manning; Obama’s decision to rely on Pentagon assurances that Manning was being appropriately treated in custody – after (former) State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley forced the issue; the mainstream media’s broad objection to Manning’s forced nudity and other degradations; and the incredible WikiLeaks revelations that have shaken corrupt governments the world over.

MP3 here. (17:00)

Mike Gogulski is the founder of the BradleyManning.org website.

Jack Hunter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_17_hunter.mp3]

Jack Hunter, talk radio host and Charleston newspaper columnist, discusses his co-authored book with Rand Paul, The Tea Party Goes to Washington; how the Tea Party movement is breaking free from the stranglehold of talk radio propaganda and is receptive to a non-interventionist foreign policy; getting serious about Constitutional government and budget deficits – and in the process butting heads with GOP operatives who use the same rhetoric but don’t mean what they say; why the neocons will have a weaker hold on Republicans in the 2012 election than they did in 2008; and Rep. Peter King’s refusal to look beyond the surface of war-on-terrorism causes.

MP3 here. (17:47)

Jack Hunter, a.k.a. the “Southern Avenger“, is a conservative commentator (WTMA 1250 AM talk radio) and columnist (Charleston City Paper) living in Charleston, South Carolina. Check out his YouTube channel.

 

Robert Naiman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_17_naiman.mp3]

Robert Naiman, Policy Director at Just Foreign Policy, discusses Gen. David Petraeus’s “progress” report (contradicted by US intelligence analysts) to Congress for the Afghan War review; polls that show Americans are turning against the war as the Paul-Kucinich-Jones resolution gains support; rhetoric vs. reality on the July 2011 troop drawdown; and why measurements of “success” are only cynically manipulated statistics, as everyone – especially Petraeus – knows the war is a lost cause.

MP3 here. (19:59)

Robert Naiman is Policy Director at Just Foreign Policy. Mr. Naiman edits the Just Foreign Policy daily news summary and writes on U.S. foreign policy at Huffington Post. He is president of the board of Truthout. Naiman has worked as a policy analyst and researcher at the Center for Economic and Policy Research and Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. He has masters degrees in economics and mathematics from the University of Illinois and has studied and worked in the Middle East.

Rep. Walter Jones

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_17_jones.mp3]

Rep. Walter Jones, eight term Congressman from North Carolina, discusses the talk of a 2014, instead of 2011, Afghanistan withdrawal deadline; the Kucinich-Jones cosponsored bill requiring Obama to get the troops out by year’s end; the elusive definition of “winning” the war (possibly meaning building roads and schools in Afghanistan while US infrastructure crumbles); why the US can’t continue as the world’s policeman while borrowing the money to do so; using smarter tactics (more bombs, fewer troops) in fighting the war on terrorism; and how a renewed military draft will serve as a forceful reminder to Americans that there are indeed wars going on.

MP3 here. (19:49)

Walter Jones was first sworn in to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1995, after serving 10 years as an elected member of the North Carolina General Assembly. Currently serving his 8th term in Congress, Congressman Jones is a member of the House Committees on Armed Services and Financial Services.

Scott McConnell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_15_mcconnell.mp3]

American Conservative magazine editor Scott McConnell discusses his revisiting of the Camp David Accords in light of Egypt’s new government that no longer guarantees friendly relations with Israel; how Carter and Brzezinski failed, despite a sincere effort, to achieve a comprehensive Mideast peace agreement and a Palestinian state; how the Israel lobby’s power waxes and wanes according to the election cycle; the US government’s chronic lack of resolve in risking a serious rift with Israel in order to break her diplomatic intransigence; how the lobby’s growth has been mirrored by a strengthened and increasingly well-informed opposition; and why, despite large numbers of settlements in the West Bank, a 2-state solution remains possible but difficult.

MP3 here. (25:00)

Scott McConnell founded The American Conservative with Pat Buchanan and Taki Theodoracopulos in 2002. A Ph.D.in history from Columbia University, he was formerly the editorial page editor of the New York Post and has been a columnist for Antiwar.com and New York Press. His work has been published in Commentary, Fortune, National Review, The New Republic, and many other publications.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_17_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses CIA contractor Raymond Davis’s release from Pakistani custody after his “blood money” check cleared; the cheap and easy restitution for US killing in third world countries (aka: “Sorry about that, kid. Here’s $1500); how Col. Gaddafi’s tenacious hold on power has surprised many of his critics; how Obama’s reluctance to be “The Decider” has decreased US leverage in foreign policy negotiations; and the National Endowment for Democracy’s watchful eye on ME/NA revolutions.

MP3 here. (19:51)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_15_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses the battle in Libya between the militarily inept pro-Gaddafi army and the even more incompetent rebel opposition; sending in Western special forces soldiers without any sort of end-game plan; the small US base in Djibouti, used for operations in West Africa; the arbitrary colonial borders that plague most Arab countries; and how Saudi Arabia’s provocative action in Bahrain may risk a military confrontation with Iran.

MP3 here. (18:23)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_14_escobar.mp3]

Asia Times columnist Pepe Escobar discusses the Mideast uprisings in terms of rebellion against neoliberal economic policy; Saudi Arabia’s crackdown on Bahrain protesters and steadfast support for the minority Sunni monarchy; why Turkey stands to win considerably more regional influence than does Iran, following successful revolutions; the hypocrisy of US foreign policy laid bare; why it’s time to end the empire and put the money to a more constructive use, as the US has lost the “beacon of democracy” role anyhow; the unavailability of Al Jazeera on American television broadcasts; and how Central Asia’s pipeline politics may change political realities but not the availability of oil in the marketplace.

MP3 here. (33:54)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

An extreme traveler, Pepe’s nose for news has taken him to all parts of the globe. He was in Afghanistan and interviewed the military leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Masoud, a couple of weeks before his assassination. Two weeks before September 11, 2001, while Pepe was in the tribal areas of Pakistan, Asia Times Online published his prophetic piece, “Get Osama! Now! Or else …” Pepe was one of the first journalists to reach Kabul after the Taliban’s retreat, and more recently he has explored and reported from Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, US and China.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_14_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his recent visit to Lebanon; the hybrid UN-Lebanon tribunal on Rafiq Hariri’s assassination that is rumored to have indicted Hezbollah members; allegations that the special tribunal is a politically motivated tool of the US and Israel; how Israel has fabricated telephone records and used them as evidence against her enemies; and how US operations in Pakistan are destabilizing the country.

MP3 here. (19:51)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Charles Featherstone

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_14_featherstone.mp3]

Charles Featherstone, regular writer at LewRockwell.com, discusses a possible quid pro quo arrangement between the US and Saudi Arabia, where Saudi support for a Libya no-fly zone is exchanged for US permission to crush the Bahrain protests; why those concerned with the Libyan rebels’ safety should remember the often-disastrous consequences of US “humanitarian” missions; the unfortunate habit of classifying US foreign policy actions in terms of public relations outcomes; and why a bloody assault on rebel-held Benghazi would prompt the UN Security Council to take action against Col. Gaddafi.

MP3 here. (16:46)

Charles H. Featherstone is a seminarian, essayist and songwriter currently living in Chicago. He writes regularly for LewRockwell.com.

David Swanson

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_11_kpfk_swanson.mp3]

This recording is from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of March 11th. The full archive is here.

David Swanson, author of War is a Lie, discusses Bradley Manning’s mistreatment in military custody, including 23-hour a day solitary confinement and forced nudity; the upcoming pro-Manning rally and protest planned for March 18-20; the failure of veterans Sen. John Kerry and Sen. John McCain to stick up for Manning; and the depressing thought that a majority of Americans abhor WikiLeaks and prefer to stay uninformed about their government’s misdeeds.

MP3 here. (13:33)

David Swanson is Co-Founder of WarIsACrime.org (formerly AfterDowningStreet.org), creator of ProsecuteBushCheney.org, Washington Director of Democrats.com and a board member of Progressive Democrats of America, the Backbone Campaign, Voters for Peace and the Liberty Tree Foundation for the Democratic Revolution. He was the press secretary for Dennis Kucinich’s 2004 presidential campaign, media coordinator for the International Labor Communications Association, and worked three years as communications coordinator for ACORN, the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now.

Matthew Harwood

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_11_harwood.mp3]

Washington DC-based writer Matthew Harwood discusses his truthout article “Peter King: Reactionary, Rash and Wrong,” on the greatly exaggerated threat of Muslim extremists in America; the “partners in counterterrorism” relationship between law enforcement and CAIR; the ridiculous conclusions drawn by terrorism analysts who ignore foreign policy implications; and why Rep. Peter King would gladly take your liberty in exchange for more false security.

MP3 here. (24:14)

Matthew Harwood is a writer in Washington DC. He is the author of chapter 25, “Enjoining an American Nightmare,” in the book Attitudes Aren’t Free: Thinking Deeply About Diversity in the U.S. Armed Forces. His work has appeared in The Washington Monthly, The Huffington Post, Truthout, The Columbia Journalism Review and elsewhere.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_11_wheeler.mp3]

Marcy Wheeler, blogging under the pseudonym “emptywheel” at firedoglake.com, discusses Obama’s weasel-worded disagreement with State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley’s (who has since resigned) candid assessment of Bradley Manning’s mistreatment in custody; why lax security in the Department of Defense – responsible for the leaked State Department cables – may have created a rift between the two agencies; Manning’s subjection to techniques designed to create “learned helplessness” and generate false confessions; and the curious timing of pro-Manning protests and the punitive measure taken against him.

MP3 here. (18:21)

Marcy Wheeler, aka emptywheel, blogs at firedoglake.com. Marcy grew up bicoastally, starting with every town in NY with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, CA, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal.  Since then, she has lived in Western MA, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, and finally–for the last 12 years–Ann Arbor.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to MI; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton”–a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging.

David Bromwich

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_10_bromwich.mp3]

David Bromwich, professor of literature at Yale University, discusses the Mideast protests that threaten US-allied autocrats and embarrass the empire; the mealy-mouthed government statements borne of an hypocritical foreign policy; burdensome obligations of the omnipresent US empire; and those interventionist think-tank writers who advocate a Libyan no-fly zone without knowing squat about the forces in play.

MP3 here. (20:00)

David Bromwich teaches literature at Yale. He has written on politics and culture for Huffington Post, The New Republic, The Nation, The New York Review of Books, and other magazines. He is editor of Edmund Burke’s selected writings On Empire, Liberty, and Reform and co-editor of the Yale University Press edition of On Liberty.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_10_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the quarterly fund drive that helps keep his website going; Obama’s decision to resume Military Commissions for Guantanamo prisoners; how plea bargains allow the government to avoid embarrassing issues of prisoner torture and bogus “war crimes” charges, yet may be the only way Guantanamo will ever be emptied; and Obama’s executive order that essentially recreates Bush’s Combatant Status Review Tribunals, which the Supreme Court found inadequate.

MP3 here. (18:58)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

Rep. Dennis Kucinich

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_11_kpfk_kucinich.mp3]

This recording is from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of March 11th. The full archive is here.

Rep. Dennis Kucinich discusses the runaround he’s been getting from the Department of Defense after requesting a visit with Bradley Manning; why Manning’s draconian pretrial treatment raises serious questions about the US criminal justice system and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates; and the Kucinich-Walter Jones co-sponsored resolution requiring the president to get the troops out of Afghanistan by year’s end.

MP3 here. (11:40)

Dennis Kucinich was born in Cleveland, Ohio on October 8, 1946. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts and a Masters in Speech Communications from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio in 1974.

Having been elected to Cleveland’s City Council at age 23, Dennis J. Kucinich was well-known to Cleveland residents when they chose him as their mayor in 1977 at the age of 31. At the time, Kucinich was the youngest person ever elected to lead a major American city.

Kucinich has held many jobs outside of politics including being a hospital orderly, newspaper copy boy, teacher, consultant, television analyst and author.

Since being elected to Congress in 1996, Kucinich has been a tireless advocate for worker rights, civil rights and human rights.

———————–

Transcript – Scott Horton Interviews Congressman Dennis Kucinich, KPFK, March 11, 2011

SCOTT HORTON: Introducing Dennis Kucinich. He’s a congressman in the Democratic Party representing Ohio’s 10th district. He ran for President in 2004 and 2008.  He is currently the chairman of the Domestic Policy Subcommittee of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and is of course staunchly antiwar and pro-Bill of Rights. Welcome to the show. How are you doing?

DENNIS KUCINICH: Good to be with you. Thanks for the invitation.

HORTON: Well I’m very happy to have you here. So, I want to talk about Afghanistan but I can’t but help but put Bradley Manning and the issues surrounding his case at the front of the list here, Congressman. It seems that the young man is being mistreated in military custody, and I know that you’ve been trying to meet with Bradley Manning, get permission to meet with him in the brig for as long as a month now, and you’ve as yet been unsuccessful in having a chance to visit him in military custody. Is that right?

KUCINICH: That’s right. I put in a request to the secretary of defense, who referred me to the secretary of the army, who referred me to the secretary of the navy, who referred me to the secretary of defense, and still not an answer on whether or not I can visit Private Manning.

HORTON: Unbelievable. I could see them giving the runaround like that to a reporter or something, but you’re a congressman. They can’t treat you that way, can they?

KUCINICH: Actually they shouldn’t treat reporters that way, but – they shouldn’t treat anyone that way. They should be accountable. But unfortunately, for whatever reason, the Pentagon doesn’t have any accountability.

HORTON: Right now I’m confused though, because his friend David House, for example, is able to visit him. Can he not just add you to that same list somehow?

KUCINICH: Well, I don’t know. I’m a member of Congress. I have to go through a different channel. The Secretary of Defense office is the appropriate channel for a member of Congress, and I have to add that as a member of the oversight committee of Congress I’m also entitled to go and see the conditions under which Private Manning is being held.

HORTON: Well you know I spoke earlier this week with the other Scott Horton, the heroic anti-torture human rights lawyer who writes for Harper’s magazine, and he was formerly the chair of the New York Bar Association’s Committees on Human Rights and International Law and so forth, and he was drawing a very strong parallel correlation it seemed between the treatment of Bradley Manning and the dehumanization which was the end really of all of that enhanced interrogation, as they called torture in the last administration – it was the program of “learned helplessness” – and he said it looked a lot to him like they’re sort of giving, I guess in my terms, he agreed with me that this is sort of the “Padilla Treatment Jr.,” that it’s not quite the full Monty they gave him, Jose Padilla, in military custody, but they are it seems severely mistreating this young man in there.

KUCINICH: It does sound similar.

HORTON: And so is there anything that you can do, say, for example, from your position as the chairman of this domestic policy subcommittee, or that’s a bit too far out of range there?

KUCINICH: This is outside the range of the subcommittee that I’m on currently, but I will say that I’m looking at all other legal options. It’s not clear because this is somebody who is within the control of the Department of Defense. However, last I heard, the Department of Defense is not outside the United States Constitution.

HORTON: Well, a good point, although [laughs] I’m not so sure if you’ve been updated on recent events there, but I guess we’ll see.

Well, listen, I got to tell you that I know I speak for a lot of people when I thank you sincerely for your efforts, if only the only result so far has been in drawing more attention to the plight of Bradley Manning. A lot of us consider him an American hero and a human hero for that matter. He seems to have helped spark these revolutions across the Middle East against terrible dictators there and has accomplished much more than that, if it is indeed true that he did what they say he did, and so it’s especially terrible to see them mistreating somebody like him, a hero like him, in this way. And so I just sincerely want to thank you for your effort and I hope you’ll continue to try to help him.

KUCINICH: Look. No one held prisoner anywhere in America should be tortured. And the fact that he’s awaiting trial and they’re doing this to him raises serious questions about our criminal justice process. And I’m going to continue my efforts to address the plight of Private Manning and to try to stop this outrageous treatment of him.

HORTON: Well I’m sure you saw today the president said, well he checked with the Defense Department and they assured him that everything is within the proper guidelines.

KUCINICH: Yeah, I checked with the Defense Department too. They told me everything was okay, the Army Secretary told me everything is okay, and a couple of days later I read that he is being forced to strip naked and stand outside his cell at attention. So, I don’t know. It seems that the higher up that people get in our government, the less information they have about what’s going on.

HORTON: Right, yeah, the more responsibility they have for what’s going on – interesting how that works, huh?

Well, you know, today I’m sure you’re also aware that the State Department’s spokesman, P.J. Crowley, along with Amnesty International, have denounced to varying degrees the treatment of this young man. You think anything in DC is going to change that would change his circumstances in Quantico? I mean anytime soon, perhaps?

KUCINICH: I think that more and more people are getting involved and that the way in which Private Manning is being treated, publicly by the way, raises real questions about the decency, about the morality, of people in the government.

And in particular the Secretary of Defense has a grave responsibility here because he’s acting in the administrative capacity of the highest responsibility. He’s acting in the president’s stead as a member of the president’s cabinet handling defense matters. He has a very grave responsibility here, and this thing – you know, if these reports keep coming out and they do not permit third parties to come in and make an assessment, I don’t think that we can take their word for it. We just can’t.

HORTON: All right now I wanted to ask you about your new resolution introduced Wednesday, I believe, House Resolution 28, “Directing the President, Pursuant to the War Powers Act, to Remove U.S. Forces from Afghanistan” – the mandate is by the end of this year. Is that correct?

KUCINICH: That’s right. This is an opportunity for people to be heard. I was just notified that the Congress is going to hear this resolution next Thursday, and that means that everyone who is concerned about it ought to call a member of Congress and urge them to vote for the resolution sponsored by myself and Congressman Jones, Republican of North Carolina. It’s a bipartisan effort to end the war. It’s House Concurrent Resolution 28, House Concurrent Resolution 28, and I’m looking forward to the debate and forward to an opportunity to once again demonstrate to the American people the urgency of us getting out of Afghanistan.

HORTON: Now when you say the House is going to debate it, you mean it will be voted out of committee and the full House will debate it? I’m not sure how that works.

KUCINICH: No, the last thing that I heard is that Republican leadership will bring it to the floor under what’s called the unanimous consent, which means everyone agrees that it can be brought up now, and they may even bypass the committee, and we’ll have two hours of debate.

HORTON: Well, we may be a decade too late, but it’d be nice if we could finally get debate started there.

KUCINICH: It is late. No question about it. And I join you, you know, for the last decade in saying that we should not have gone in there with our troops and we should not have stayed there. But we are there and we need to continue our efforts to get out, and this is another opportunity.

HORTON: Well, you know, Robert Gates and the generals continually seem to push the so-called time horizon – you never really get to a horizon, right? And they seem to say now 2014, 2015, etcetera. What is the policy, do you think? Because sometimes they admit that they’ll have to negotiate their way out of there if they are to ever leave, that they cannot, you know, outright win a military victory. Why are we fighting a war in Afghanistan anyway, Congressman?

KUCINICH: People have forgotten, you know, we – first it was to go after al Qaeda, and now it’s to keep Afghanistan safe. But since the occupation has fueled an insurgency, the best protection we can give the people is to get out.

HORTON: All right, now, I want to ask you about the possibility of somehow forming a coalition and running for president on a joint ticket with Republican congressman Ron Paul. Because it seems like, though you’re a progressive and he’s a libertarian Republican, that the issues that you two agree on and vote together on are consistently the very most important issues facing our society: Peace, the Bill of Rights, corporate welfare, etcetera. Maybe we could really change the two-party system to, you know, the People versus the War Party, and get all the good guys on one side and those for what we have now on the other.

KUCINICH: I have a great deal of respect for Ron Paul. You know, one need not agree with someone on everything to be able to take their measure, and he’s someone who is totally dedicated to this country, who is courageous, and I’m glad that he and I have had the chance to work together in opposing these wars and in challenging Wall Street and in working to protect civil liberties.

HORTON: All right, well, I want to thank you again for your time on the show. Thank you for all your efforts against the wars, efforts for peace and for protecting the Bill of Rights and for accountability and the rule of law as it is meant to apply to elected and appointed officials as well. You have a lot of fans at KPFK, and of course at Antiwar.com, and again I want to thank you for your time on the show today.

KUCINICH: Thank you. Thanks for the invitation, and let’s talk again, okay?

HORTON: Great.

Robert A. Pape

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_10_pape.mp3]

Robert A. Pape, coauthor of Cutting the Fuse: The Explosion of Global Suicide Terrorism and How to Stop It, discusses the extremely high correlation of suicide terrorism with foreign military occupation; why it’s no coincidence that the surge in Afghanistan has increased violence while the drawdown in Iraq has lessened it; why those advocating no-fly zones in Libya should look at the terrible record in 1990s Iraq; the “asymmetrical” warfare, up to and including suicide attacks, that could be expected in response to a foreign military occupation of America; and the significant progress in convincing Congress of terrorism’s real root causes.

MP3 here. (22:44)

Robert A. Pape is Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago specializing in international security affairs. His publications include Dying to Win: The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism (Random House 2005); Bombing to Win: Air Power and Coercion in War (Cornell 1996), “Why Economic Sanctions Do Not Work,” International Security (1997), “The Determinants of International Moral Action,” International Organization (1999); “The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism,” American Political Science Review (2003); and “Soft Balancing against the United States,” International Security (2005).

His commentary on international security policy has appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, New Republic, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, and Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, as well as on Nightline, ABC News, CBS News, CNN, Fox News, and National Public Radio. Before coming to Chicago in 1999, he taught international relations at Dartmouth College for five years and air power strategy for the USAF’s School of Advanced Airpower Studies for three years. He received his Ph. D. from the University of Chicago in 1988 and graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Pittsburgh in 1982. His current work focuses on the causes of suicide terrorism and the politics of unipolarity.

 

Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_09_vlahos.mp3]

Kelley B. Vlahos, featured Antiwar.com columnist and contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine, discusses the police accountability and prison reform website criminaljustice.change.org; why the protests in Iraq – so far met with arrests, beatings and torture – make Washington squirm; and the fate of Antiwar Radio guest Shane Bauer, who has been in Iranian custody since being arrested for suspected espionage in July 2009.

MP3 here. (27:48)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos has spent over a decade as a political reporter in Washington DC. Currently, she is a contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine and its daily weblog, @TAC. She is also a Washington correspondent for the DC-based homeland security magazine, Homeland Security Today, a long-time political writer for FOXNews.com, a regular columnist for Antiwar.com and a contributor to CriminalJustice.Change.org

Ahmed al-Assy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_09_al-assy.mp3]

Ahmed al-Assy, an Egyptian-American living in Egypt and a participant in the Tahrir Square protests, discusses the generally positive reception for Egypt’s new Prime Minister and Foreign Minister; rumors that new attacks on Coptic Christians are yet again the work of agent provocateurs; the discovery of Egypt’s wiretapping program; roaming gangs of thugs returning to Tahrir Square; the hotbeds of activism within recently reopened universities; and Ahmed’s successful journey to Gaza, where he toured the unrepaired devastation from Operation Cast Lead and delivered a symbolic bag of cement.

MP3 here. (34:26)

Ahmed al-Assy is an Egyptian American who has lived in Egypt for the last 10 years. He was a participant in the Tahrir Square protests.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_08_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the Quantico brig’s confiscation of Bradley Manning’s underwear and flip flops (and the rest of his clothes), supposedly to prevent his suicide; why this is punitive treatment for Manning – a model prisoner who has been cleared by the brig psychiatrist as non-suicidal; the theoretical possibility of prosecuting Manning’s jailers; how the mistreatment of prisoners in military custody could negatively effect the rights of US soldiers captured by an enemy; and Obama’s reshuffling (not elimination) of Guantanamo.

MP3 here. (17:42)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

—————————————-

Transcript – Scott Horton Interviews The Other Scott Horton, March 8, 2011

SCOTT HORTON: All right, y’all, welcome back to the show. It’s Antiwar Radio. Our next guest is the other Scott Horton, heroic anti-torture international human rights lawyer, contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, that’s Harpers.org for their website there. His blog is called No Comment, and of course he’s been the chair of the New York Bar Association’s committees on international law and human rights, and he’s got a piece today called "Inhumanity at Quantico" there at the blog No Comment. That’s Harpers.org/subjects/nocomment. Welcome back to the show, Scott. How are you doing?

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Great to be with you.

SCOTT HORTON: I’m very happy have you here. So, who’s this Bradley Manning guy, what’s going on at Quantico, and don’t they have laws about stuff like that?

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: [Laughs] Why, how can you of all people ask me who Bradley Manning is?

SCOTT HORTON: Well I figured I’d just set you up to tell the story, you know. He’s my hero, that’s who he is.

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Yeah, I mean Bradley Manning, of course, has been in prison since May of last year and he is under suspicion of having leaked thousands of classified and confidential government documents to WikiLeaks, a small portion of which have already been published and which I think it’s fair to say have had quite a lot of effect around the world.

I mean, certainly a lot of people look at the uprising and demonstrations that are shaking the Arab world. If you trace that back to its beginning in Tunisia, it seems to have an awful lot to do with a set of WikiLeaks documents which were published which revealed how completely corrupt and venal the government of Tunisia was. It revealed that that was the candid assessment of U.S. diplomats, I think quite a correct assessment.

And similarly we’ve had documents revealed concerning the police state in Egypt that have had quite an effect there, in fact led this weekend to crowds of tens of thousands of people storming the headquarters of the secret police in Alexandria and Cairo, and they put on line films and photographs and documents there concerning the torture of thousands of Egyptian citizens there.

So, you know, I think we can trace all this back to Bradley Manning and ask, you know, is that a bad thing? Hard to make that argument. I’d say most – I’d say, you know, he’s emerging as a hero in many parts of the world today.

SCOTT HORTON: Yeah, well, as you say, for very good reason. And, yeah, I was actually reading an article that had it that the Tunisia WikiLeaks had come out and had been very widely publicized in North Africa at least since November. And that, you know, this had been a major part of the conversation going on in that country for two months leading up to the revolution there. Certainly he deserves a pat on the back for that.

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Yeah, of course, if he was the person who leaked these documents, God bless him.

SCOTT HORTON: Right. Right, he’s 100% beyond a shadow of a doubt convicted of being my hero, but he’s only alleged to have done any of this, from a criminal point of view. Which is a very important point, because, as you said, he’s been held since May – they held him for like a month in Kuwait before they even brought him here. Now they have him at Quantico, Virginia. He hasn’t been convicted of anything and yet they’re treating him in ways that I’m pretty sure it would be illegal to treat a convict. I don’t know what difference it makes whether he’s been convicted of anything or not in this case. Maybe you can help me out there. But they’re really mistreating my man here.

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Well he’s a U.S. soldier. And, you know, we have very clear standards for the incarceration of American soldiers. And, in fact, I’d say, whereas the federal prisons and state prisons come in for an awful lot of criticism, by and large penal experts and prison experts who look at the military prisons and detention system have been pretty complimentary about the way they’re run – very professional, very correct, keeping an emphasis on the dignity of the prisoners, attending to their health and all medical needs. And I’d say generally also the brig at Quantico has had a good reputation and had good marks.

But Bradley Manning is not being treated like any other prisoner who’s being held at Quantico. They seem to have created some very bizarre special regime for him that involves keeping him in isolation, sharply, severely limiting his contacts with other people, requiring him to sleep and be awake at different times of the day, keeping him under constant observation, and most recently now, I think, and most bizarrely, he’s been subjected to a regime of enforced nudity.

He is required to stand up, remove all of his clothing, turn it over to his guard, stand naked outside of his cell while they search the cell, and then to spend the night naked in his cell.

And, you know, what on earth is the reason for this?

So when this question is pressed with the military, first they were somewhat embarrassed by it and didn’t want to give any answer. They said that "his privacy" required them not to discuss this. And then they came back and said, "Well, he’s under suicide watch, and because he’s under suicide watch we can’t let him wear any clothing." Which is, I’d say, one of the most bizarre responses they’ve ever uttered. Also definitely untrue.

You know, the camp psychiatrist has said that he’s not a suicide suspect, so that’s nonsense, and we know when we look at Department of Defense documents that were prepared in connection with the war on terror, we know that the Department of Defense approved a special regime of enforced nudity for prisoners in the war on terror, and we know from some of these documents exactly why, because it makes them feel vulnerable and weak in the face of their prison guards.

So it’s a psychological preparation technique, and this gets linked back to the Seligman notion of "learned helplessness" that Jane Mayer explored in her book and others have written about.

So that is of course the basis for this nudity regime, and one of the big concerns we’ve had for a long time about the war on terror is that these techniques which are approved for use on suspect terrorists would wind up being used against American citizens who are not under suspicion of having done anything wrong, or certainly nothing terrorist, and that’s exactly the case here.

SCOTT HORTON: Right. Well, and you know, their narrative even about him, you know, when they try to smear him, is just what-a-weakling-he-is kind of a thing, because they’ve got nothing else on him, so certainly he’s not going to beat up all the guards and escape or [laughs] you know some kind of movie plot. But, you know, so, okay, here’s the thing–

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Even more than that, Scott, they’ve said repeatedly that he is in fact a model prisoner who does exactly as he is directed at all times. Not a trouble case by any stretch of the imagination.

SCOTT HORTON: Right. So, we talked with Bob Parry yesterday on the show about the CIA and learned helplessness and all these things, as you mention there, and the way it’s been put into effect here, in the case of Bradley Manning, is it’s all these excuses, right? "These are precautions to protect him" and all these kinds of things. "That’s why we take away his pillow and that’s why we take away his clothes and whatever is because he might hurt himself."

But do you think it’s just, you know, basically an open-and-shut case, if you’re a prosecutor, could you indict on – this really is kind of the Padilla treatment junior here. They can’t quite get away with the full scale MK Ultra isolation and desperation and hallucinogenic drugs and everything, but they can try to make him as miserable as they can and degrade him, take his humanity away from him as much as they can, if they have to call it suicide precautions or whatever – is that basically your view of this?

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: That’s exactly right, and in fact we know from some other government documents that were leaked that the government will have one reason for doing this, and they will always cite the safety and security of the prisoner to the media as the reason, even though that’s almost never in fact the reason. Why? Because that’s the only thing that they can invoke that could theoretically justify what they’re doing.

But I think you’re right that, you know, what we’re looking at is basically sort of long-term psychological warfare that’s being waged on this young man to, you know, to erode his self-confidence, to build up his anxieties, and ultimately potentially to drive him crazy. I mean, that is what’s happened with a number of prisoners in the past who have been subjected to these isolation techniques.

SCOTT HORTON: And now, Scott, if you were a prosecutor – which I hope you never, you know, get a job working for the executive branch like that, that’d be terrible. But if you were, and you had a grand jury, could you prosecute these guys for what they’re doing to Bradley Manning? It’s obviously criminal, but is it illegal?

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: I’d say two things you’d have to look at very closely. One, is there some long-term physical harm to Bradley Manning that’s resulting from this? And that’s something I’ve got to get a doctor or a psychiatrist to give me an opinion on. And the other would be, do we see any evidence of malice? I mean actually malicious conduct by the jailers.

And in this case I think we do see some evidence of that, because there’ve been some instances where visitors have gone there, have been subject to all sorts of harassment, threats, intimidation – in one case a car used by one of the visitors was impounded and seized – and I think it got so out of hand that I know the general counsel of the Department of Defense was sent down to personally investigate what happened, and right after he went there and conducted his investigation, suddenly the commander of the brig at Quantico was dismissed and replaced.

So that suggests to me that even way up in the Pentagon, someone has figured out that there is something very foul going on there at the brig in the way Bradley Manning is being treated. So, possibly yes.

SCOTT HORTON: Yeah, I mean, it’s funny because, you know, we’re talking in 2011, so it’s not like this is really still the U.S.A. I mean the question really is, in this day and age, is that still illegal? Because, you know, like you said, we hire the Egyptians to do our torture for us and we, you know, import their way of government into our own system basically. First we treat Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and Ramzi bin al-Shibh like this, next we treat Bradley Manning this way. Obama claims the power to kill you or me if he feels like it, so why not? You know?

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: And remember this weekend where you had the tens of thousands of demonstrators storm those two secret police facilities. What were they up to? They wanted to prevent the secret police from shredding documents and destroying evidence about how they tortured and abused prisoners. That was the whole purpose. In fact, the army stood by and let them storm the headquarters, and a lot of that stuff has now been put on the internet. In fact, there is very strong evidence of the use of torture and mistreatment of prisoners.

So I think this is really a huge issue globally, very embarrassing for the United States to be tied up in the same sort of abusive conduct that many of these Arab dictators had with respect to prisoners.

SCOTT HORTON: All right, now I guess I’ll let you pick here, because we probably only have time to really cover one here, and that would be either the restarting of the trials at Guantanamo or the two new charges against Bradley Manning, if you want to stick with the Bradley Manning story here. I mean there’s 22 new ones, but the two major ones, from what I’ve read, the prosecutors are only asking for life in prison, but the judge isn’t bound by that, and he could be sentenced to death for his heroic WikiLeaking – alleged.

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Well, I’d focus on the most serious of those charges, which is aiding the enemy. And that’s – you know, it’s been rumored that a charge like that might be brought. We have to note that, you know, this is the prosecutor’s recommendation. They still have to be approved by the command authority, so we don’t know for certain that these charges ultimately will be brought and he’s going to face them, so a little bit more process to go through.

But let’s just ask, who is the enemy here exactly? You know, I mean we’re talking about documents that were provided ultimately to major newspapers around the world and to WikiLeaks, so have the prosecutors developed that the New York Times is the enemy? That’s a pretty strange standard. Or do they think he was in fact leaking it to the Taliban or, you know, or al Qaeda?

I’d say if the second is the case, I’d be very interested to see what evidence they have of that, because it looks right now that they have no evidence whatsoever of it, and suggesting that leaking something to the news media is aiding the enemy is a very bizarre charge that has not stood up in proceedings before. So I think this is being done basically as what we call in terrorem, to frighten him, and I’d be very surprised to see that charge stand at the end of the day, and even more surprised to see it go to trial and be sustained.

But on the other hand I would say, you know, charges – he as a military person was acting laxly with classified evidence or allowed that to come into public circulation – that’s serious enough stuff, and from everything I see and hear it looks like the government’s got an awful lot of evidence of that. So I’d say, you know, I’d say our friend Bradley Manning is certainly facing a very serious trial.

SCOTT HORTON: Right, but now, are they bound in, the military lawyers, the same way a civilian prosecutor is, that he’s not allowed to charge a case that he doesn’t really believe he can prosecute? I mean, he can’t just threaten the death penalty for jaywalking just to get a plea, right?

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Well he has to believe that he has good evidence that would lead a conviction before he brings the charge.

And I have to say with respect to the death penalty, there’s a very, very good reason. I mean, we haven’t had a death penalty case in the military criminal justice system since I think 1964, so it’s been 50 years almost since that’s happened. Well there’s a good reason why the U.S. military doesn’t bring death penalty cases, and that is, whatever we do to our service personnel in our military justice system is fair game in a future conflict for any enemy to do to our soldiers if it brings them up on charges. And for that exact reason we’ve had the view for the last 50 years of never seeking the death penalty.

Instead what the military prosecutors have done is really sort of the back door. If they think a case really is suitable for the death penalty, they will muster the person out of the military and turn them over to civilian prosecutors so that the military is NOT in the practice of seeking the death penalty.

So I think we see a lot of points here where for policy reasons they’re contemplating some mighty strange things that will not serve U.S. interests.

SCOTT HORTON: Yeah, well, all right, there’s a few different more ways to develop that line, but I wanted to ask you real quick if you could give us a comment on yesterday’s executive order regarding Guantanamo Bay?

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Well, it’s going to take some time to study and understand, and particularly there are going to be some regulations that will help us understand, but I’d say this is President Obama walking away, certainly to some extent at least, from his pledge to shut down Gitmo. He’s saying we’re going to go ahead with trials, and he’s okaying a regime of indefinite detention.

So that’s completely contrary to what he promised he would do during the campaign, and the only sort of glimmers of something positive here are the way he’s setting up a review board to review these claims – he’s saying no longer will these be military officer review boards, he’s going to bring in people from State Department, Justice Department, other agencies, so they’ll be more broadly representative. So he’s promising that they’ll be more functional and provide more meaningful review.

But I think most people are very, very skeptical of the review board process in light of what happened at Guantanamo over a period of a half a decade with the status review tribunals, CSRTs. So I think in general this has got to be viewed as a big setback for Barack Obama.

SCOTT HORTON: Yeah. Or for us, at his hand. For justice.

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Well I’d say his betrayal of his promises.

SCOTT HORTON: Yeah, indeed. All right, well, thank you very much, Scott. I always appreciate it.

OTHER SCOTT HORTON: Great to be with you.

SCOTT HORTON: All right, everybody, that is The Other Scott Horton, heroic anti-torture international human rights lawyer, contributing editor at Harper’s.org and Harper’s Magazine, and professor at Columbia too.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_09_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the differing reports on whether Libyans want outside intervention or not; the media’s acceptance that the US government is with the Mideast protesters, though the autocrats were supported right up to the end; the Algerian protests that succeeded in getting the Emergency Law repealed but not the corresponding restrictions; why Israel may now be powerless to stop an Egypt-style Palestinian uprising demanding independence; the potential for Croatian protests to spark revolution in other non-Muslim European countries; and some advice to Saudi Arabian protest planners: don’t give advance notice, or the state will shut you down.

MP3 here. (21:52)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers across the country.

Les Roberts

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_08_roberts.mp3]

Les Roberts, Associate Clinical Professor of Population and Family Health at Columbia University, discusses the hundreds of thousands of unreported Iraqi deaths, 80% of which were previously uncounted; how “excess deaths” are inferred from statistical sampling; the changing cause of death in Iraq during 2004-06, from US bombs to Iraqi-on-Iraqi violence; how lazy journalists failed to cross check fatalities and assumed newly reported deaths were already accounted for; and the lying US government officials who claimed “we don’t do body counts.”

MP3 here. (20:11)

Les Roberts did a post-doctorate fellowship in epidemiology at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention where he worked for 4 years. In 1994, he worked as an epidemiologist for the World Health Organization in Rwanda during their civil war. Les was Director of Health Policy at the International Rescue Committee from Dec. 2000 until April of 2003. Les had led over 50 surveys in 17 countries, mostly measuring mortality in times of war. In recent years he has taken part in studies to measure mortality in DR Congo, Iraq, and Zimbabwe. His present research is focused on developing methods to document the incidence of rape. He spends his weekends in Central New York with his wife Mary Grace.

Robert Parry

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_07_parry.mp3]

Robert Parry, founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com, discusses the worsening conditions of accused Wiki-leaker Bradley Manning’s imprisonment; how prisoners in Abu Ghraib and elsewhere were abused and degraded into a state of “learned helplessness;” and why, considering that WikiLeaks helped spark the ME/NA protests and advance the (supposed) US mission of spreading democracy, Manning should be applauded instead of prosecuted.

MP3 here. (18:21)

Robert Parry is an investigative journalist who won the George Polk Award in 1984 for reporting on the Iran-Contra affair and uncovering Oliver North’s involvement in it. He is the founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com and author of Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush, Trick or Treason: The October Surprise Mystery and Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.

Kathy Kelly

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_07_kelly.mp3]

Kathy Kelly, co-coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence, discusses the NATO attack (no, not this one) that killed nine Afghan children; why the sole survivor’s eyewitness account could explain Gen. Petraeus’s quick and uncharacteristic apology; how US bribes – paid to ensure the safety of supply convoys from Pakistan – directly fund Afghan warlords and insurgents; and why it’s well past time to end the wars and bring all the troops home.

MP3 here. (19:01)

Kathy Kelly currently helps coordinate the Voices for Creative Nonviolence campaign. She helped initiate Voices in the Wilderness, a campaign to end the UN/US sanctions against Iraq. For bringing medicine to Iraq in open violation of the UN/US sanctions, she and other campaign members were notified of a proposed $163,000 penalty for the organization, threatened with 12 years in prison, and eventually fined $20,000, a sum which they’ve refused to pay.

Kelly helped organize and participated in nonviolent direct action teams in Haiti (summer of 1994), Bosnia (August, 1993, December, 1992) and Iraq (Gulf Peace Team, 1991). In April of 2002, she was among the first internationals to visit the Jenin camp, where conventional military forces of the Israeli Defense Force had destroyed over 100 civilian homes, in the Occupied West Bank.

In 1988, she was sentenced to one year in prison for planting corn on nuclear missile silo sites. Kelly served nine months of the sentence in Lexington KY maximum security prison. In the spring of 2004, she served three months at Pekin federal prison for crossing the line as part of an ongoing “School of the Americas Watch” effort to close an army military combat training school at Fort Benning, GA.

Kelly is active with the Catholic Worker movement and, as a pacifist and war tax refuser, has refused payment of all Federal income tax since 1980.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_07_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses the positive effects of governmental paralysis; why Obama gets too much credit for simply following the Iraq SOFA signed by G.W. Bush; the nearly three-fold increase of troops and mercenaries in Afghanistan during the Obama administration; the degeneration of principled antiwar arguments into partisan talking points; and how the Mideast revolutions now unfolding could have swept up Saddam Hussein’s Iraq as well – had he been left alone.

MP3 here. (19:50)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Jonathan Landay

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_04_landay.mp3]

Jonathan S. Landay, national security and intelligence correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers, discusses how Libya’s popular uprising against Col. Gaddafi has descended into civil war; loyalist forces laying siege to strategic rebel-held cities; the end of protests in Tripoli; how humanitarian airlifts could be possible without bombing air defenses or maintaining a no-fly zone; and why US intervention is the least bad option for Libya, despite multi-generational US support for ME/NA autocracies.

MP3 here. (29:24)

Jonathan S. Landay, national security and intelligence correspondent, has written about foreign affairs and U.S. defense, intelligence and foreign policies for 15 years. From 1985-94, he covered South Asia and the Balkans for United Press International and then the Christian Science Monitor. He moved to Washington in December 1994 to cover defense and foreign affairs for the Christian Science Monitor and joined Knight Ridder in October 1999.

He speaks frequently on national security matters, particularly the Balkans. In 2005, he was part of a team that won a National Headliners Award for “How the Bush Administration Went to War in Iraq.” He also won a 2005 Award of Distinction from the Medill School of Journalism for “Iraqi exiles fed exaggerated tips to news media.”

 

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_04_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses Robert Gates’s warning on the spillover effects of imposing a Libyan no-fly zone; the daunting prospect of invading and occupying Libya, a country larger than both Iraq and Afghanistan; why the US is incapable of a politically neutral humanitarian intervention; the ongoing negotiations in Yemen; the strange apologetic violence against protesters in Bahrain; and the reported crackdown on dissident Iraqi intellectuals protesting the Maliki government.

MP3 here. (24:44)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers across the country.

Jennifer Van Bergen

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_04_van-bergen.mp3]

Jennifer Van Bergen, a journalist, author and law lecturer, discusses the new charges against Bradley Manning, including “aiding the enemy” which carries a possible death sentence; the legal distinction in the UCMJ between giving intelligence to the enemy and communicating with the enemy; why Manning should be treated like a whistleblower and not an enemy combatant; the chilling implications of a broadly applied Espionage Act; and how the dozens of charges against Manning could be softening him up for a plea deal favorable to the government.

MP3 here. (18:38)

Jennifer Van Bergen, a journalist with a law degree, is the author of The Twilight of Democracy: the Bush Plan for America. She writes frequently on civil liberties, human rights, and international law.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_04_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses the “Red State Fascist” camaraderie protest against Muslims in Yorba Linda, CA; why Sharia law and the Ferengi Rules of Acquisition are equally likely to supplant the US Constitution; and the irony of protesting Sharia in the US, while helping to install it in Iraq.

MP3 here. (18:21)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Robert Higgs

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_02_higgs.mp3]

Robert Higgs, senior fellow at the Independent Institute and author of Crisis and Leviathan, discusses the theory that Islamic terrorists and other “outsiders brought about the 2008 financial crisis, rather than loose monetary policy and securitization run amok; how to make a quick buck by pitching ridiculous reports to the Pentagon; the government’s post-9/11 spending binge that permeated throughout government, not just in the Pentagon; why wars are financed with deficits instead of direct taxation; the weak alternatives to the US dollar as world reserve currency; and an economic forecast of 1970s style stagflation.

MP3 here. (21:22)

Robert Higgs is Senior Fellow in Political Economy for The Independent Institute and Editor of the Institute’s quarterly journal The Independent Review. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, and he has taught at the University of Washington, Lafayette College, Seattle University, and the University of Economics, Prague. He has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University and Stanford University, and a fellow for the Hoover Institution and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Higgs is the editor of The Independent Institute books Opposing the Crusader State, The Challenge of Liberty, Re-Thinking Green, Hazardous to Our Health? and Arms, Politics, and the Economy, plus the volume Emergence of the Modern Political Economy.

His authored books include Neither Liberty Nor Safety, Depression, War, and Cold War, Politická ekonomie strachu (The Political Economy of Fear, in Czech), Resurgence of the Warfare State, Against Leviathan, The Transformation of the American Economy 1865-1914, Competition and Coercion, and Crisis and Leviathan. A contributor to numerous scholarly volumes, he is the author of more than 100 articles and reviews in academic journals.

Jacob Hornberger

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_02_hornberger.mp3]

Jacob Hornberger, founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses why the Egypt revolution proves (to the Left) that Americans don’t need guns; how armed protesters could have better defended themselves against secret police and thugs; how an armed citizenry is a worst-case-scenario insurance policy and deterrent to tyrannical government; and how the US has been an enabler, provider and founder of dictatorships, “spreading democracy” rhetoric notwithstanding.

MP3 here. (20:37)

Jacob G. Hornberger is founder and president of The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is a regular writer for The Future of Freedom Foundation’s publication, Freedom Daily, and is a co-editor or contributor to the eight books that have been published by the Foundation.

Ara Sanjian and Dennis Marburger

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_02_sanjian_marburger.mp3]

Ara Sanjian, Associate Professor in Armenian and Middle Eastern History, discusses the Armenian demonstrations that are somewhat inspired by Egypt et al, but are of a different character; discontent about lack of political reform and economic opportunity; conflicts arising from border disputes with Azerbaijan; how the Soviet dissolution left the Armenian economy in the hands of oligarchs; and the few bright spots: an educated populace and affordable internet access and mobile phones.

MP3 here. (15:35)

Ara Sanjian is Associate Professor in Armenian and Middle Eastern History at the University of Michigan – Dearborn.

Dennis Marburger is a friend of Antiwar Radio.

Eric Garris

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_01_garris.mp3]

Eric Garris, founder and director of Antiwar.com, discusses why the Libyans had better hurry up with deposing Col. Gaddafi, before they get unsolicited “help” from the US or NATO; Ron Paul’s prescient warnings about the inevitable bankruptcy of empire; how popular protests in Iraq put the US in an impossible bind over which side to choose; and the dozen or so hard working people that keep Antiwar.com going, courtesy your donations.

MP3 here. (18:59)

Eric Garris is the founder, managing editor, director and webmaster of Antiwar.com.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_01_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses his interview with the “eccentric” Col. Gaddafi during the Reagan administration; the Western media’s exaggeration of Libyan violence, which provides a pretext for US military intervention; how the neocons got their Middle East democratic revolution, but not in the countries they intended; the colonial history of Morocco and Algeria, and their current repressive police states; how Arab revolutions are propelled by large youth populations and bleak economic prospects; and why the Saudi monarchy will more likely be felled by internal strife than popular revolt.

MP3 here. (29:45)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Chris Hellman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_01_hellman.mp3]

Chris Hellman, Communications and Budget Analyst for the National Priorities Project, discusses the $1.2 trillion national security budget; how government secrecy and over-classification of documents hides wasteful programs and prevents Congressional oversight; huge projected increases in health care and pensions for veterans and retired military; and the bloated Homeland Security, intelligence and State Department budgets.

MP3 here. (20:17)

Chris Hellman is Communications and Budget Analyst for the National Priorities Project.

Chris joined NPP after serving as a military policy analyst for the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation where his work focused on national security spending, military planning and policy, base closures, major weapons systems, trends in the defense industry, global military spending, and homeland security. Prior to joining the Center, Chris spent six years as a Senior Research Analyst at the Center for Defense Information. He also worked for two years as a military budget specialist at Physicians for Social Responsibility. Previously, Chris spent ten years on Capitol Hill as a congressional staffer working on national security and foreign policy issues. He is a frequent media commentator on military planning, policy, and budgetary issues and is the author of numerous reports and articles. He holds a Bachelors Degree from Middlebury College in Vermont

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_28_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the eight indicators of fraud in the Iran nuclear “alleged studies” documents; the smear campaign against IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei for daring to question their authenticity; how the (probably Mossad created) documents form the foundation of US allegations that Iran has, or had, a nuclear weapons program; Iran’s objection to IAEA demands for secret military information; and the unexpected developments in Iran’s missile program that exposed one of the documents as a forgery.

MP3 here. (39:03)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_28_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the threat of US military intervention in Libya, and why it shouldn’t happen; how the overweening National Endowment for Democracy screws up political revolutions all over the world; how successful and (relatively) peaceful Mideast uprisings against tyrants undermine the violent fundamentalism promoted by al Qaeda; the US sweating bullets about CIA employee Raymond Davis spilling the beans to his Pakistani captors; the weak case for Davis’s diplomatic immunity; and why Pakistan’s government may fall if it fails to prosecute and convict Davis, in the face of repeated US calls for his release.

MP3 here. (21:55)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

L.Pierre de Rochemont and Morgana Gallaway

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_28_rochemont_gallaway.mp3]

L. Pierre de Rochemont and Morgana Gallaway, members of the Stop Austin Scanners! campaign to get TSA naked body scanners out of Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, discuss the questionable effectiveness and serious health concerns of TSA scans; invasive searches conducted by TSA agents who are not even sworn law enforcement officers; possible Texas legislation banning scanners from the state; and the broad coalition of opponents to TSA methods and behavior.

MP3 here. (20:10)

L. Pierre de Rochemont is the founder and CEO of GigaCircuits, a company that applies ceramic nanotechnology to the wireless handset industry.

Morgana Gallaway is a graduate of the University of St Andrews in Scotland and author of The Nightingale, a novel set in war-torn Iraq.