Scott Horton Interviews Haroon Siddiqui

Scott Horton, March 29, 2011

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Haroon Siddiqui, editorial writer for the Toronto Star, discusses the disparaging reference to Middle Eastern public opinion as “word from the Arab street;” how the scenes from Egypt’s revolution differed from the stereotypical images of Arabs imagined by Americans; the shaky foundations of countries invented by post-colonial European bureaucrats; why Arab monarchs are described as “moderates” because they cooperate with the US, not because they are remotely democratic; the large number of US-allied Arab League states that are either monarchies or autocracies; why people rebelling against repressive regimes (as in Libya) deserve protection, even though the US is not a reliable partner and frequently makes matter worse; and the obvious solution to problems in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

MP3 here. (25:13)

Haroon Siddiqui is the author of Being Muslim. He has worked for Canadian newspapers in various positions since 1968 and currently writes editorials for the Toronto Star.

3 Responses to “Haroon Siddiqui”

  1. I must say I'm always disappointed when people equate democracy with freedom and as the end goal of all oppressed people. Democracy is a terrible form of governance. Nothing more than mob-rule on a large scale. Democracy is, as Hans Herrman-Hoppe would say, the god that failed. Try real freedom!

  2. most of the so called democratic govt. and states survived by removingthier citizesn to newly conquered lands like in australia or canada or by looting others wealth in africa and india and china

  3. Mr Siddiqui speaks a lot of sense although that has never influenced American policy. I would take issue with his claim however that because the UN Security Council passed a resolution that makes the attack on Libya legal. There is a solid body of international law opinion which would argue that the resolution is itself outside the ambit of the UN Charter. In any case the attack has morphed beyond the terms of the resolution which is why the Norwegians rapidly withdrew their cooperation.
    And please, stop perpetuating the myth of the 19 Muslim hijackers on 9/11.

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