Scott Horton Interviews Noah Shachtman

Scott Horton, March 31, 2011

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Noah Shachtman, editor of WIRED magazine‚Äôs Danger Room blog, discusses his article, “Anthrax Redux: Did the Feds Nab the Wrong Guy?” revisiting the FBI’s case against Bruce Ivins; the compelling circumstantial evidence despite the many crucial unknowns, such as motive and opportunity; FBI pressure brought to bear on Ivins and his family, leading to his seemingly-credible suicide (though no autopsy was performed); his coworkers’ near-unanimous opinion of his innocence; and how anthrax hysteria helped sell the case for war on Iraq.

MP3 here. (23:46)

Noah Shachtman is a contributing editor at WIRED magazine, a non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution, and the editor of the Danger Room blog.

2 Responses to “Noah Shachtman”

  1. Scott/Philip/whatever his name is this week won't publicize this one, because it conclusively shows — by definition — that more than one person was involved.

    New York Times, Novem­ber 29, 2001, “A NATION CHALLENGED: OVERSEAS PUZZLE; U.S. Con­firms Anthrax in Chilean Letter”

    Among the let­ters sent in the 2001 Anthrax Attacks was a let­ter sent to CHILE and mailed from FLORIDA but post­marked ZURICH, SWITZERLAND.

    From the NY Times piece: "This let­ter con­tain­ing anthrax was mailed to Dr. Anto­nio Banfi, a pedi­a­tri­cian in San­ti­ago, Chile. Although the return address was Orlando, Florida, the post­mark was Zurich, Switzer­land. The let­ter was sent via DHL, which used a Swiss bulk mail ship­per in New York and a Swiss post­mark. Unlike the anthrax let­ters with U.S. addressees, the let­ter to Chile was mailed in a busi­ness enve­lope and had a type-written return address, a busi­ness in Florida. Dr. Banfi received the let­ter, but found it sus­pi­cious and gave it to the Chilean author­i­ties. No one is known to have been infected with anthrax from it. The let­ter baf­fled Amer­i­can and Chilean offi­cials because, they say, “as they dig deeper, noth­ing quite adds up.”

    Google it.

  2. Due to the nature of military anthrax, the notion that one person could transmit the anthrax in the way it was delivered, is absurd.

    PNAC, BMI, FBI, NSA

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