Scott Horton Interviews Philip Giraldi

Scott Horton, March 31, 2011

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses how (relatively) peaceful and quick Arab uprisings make Al Qaeda’s brand of violent revolution even less appealing; the slippery slope of interventions started with Libya, where there is no logical stopping point (why not Iran, Syria, Yemen, Bahrain, etc.); blaming Iran for all the popular uprisings against US-allied dictators; and efforts to reassert US influence in Egypt, especially regarding continued cooperation with Israel on Gaza.

MP3 here. (19:51)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

9 Responses to “Philip Giraldi”

  1. Some months ago, during his trip to the US, Netanyahu said something about how Iran won't have strategic edge over Israel through Syria and Lebanon. The reason for this is obvious: if Israel gets into a war with Iran without taking out Hezbollah and Syria the amount of rocket attacks that Israel would face from Syria + Hezbollah + Iran would be too overwhelming and Israel would then be fighting a war on three fronts – with two of them right on their border. Netanyahu's statement was just an admission that Israel has to take out Syria and Lebanon before the war against Iran could start. There is no question that the protests in Syria are the work of Israel (and probably the US) and they will probably take care of Assad. And I suspect that when these "protests" in Syria reach their climax it'll certainly be a convenient time for Israel to start their next war with Hezbollah since their supply routes from Syria will be completely disrupted and the Syrian army wouldn't be able to intervene since they would have too big of a problem on their homefront to do anything about it. But, in any case, Hezbollah and Syria have to go before Iran gets bombed, and Iran will be bombed. It's just a matter of time.

  2. Israel should be very careful.

    They're in danger of losing all their enemies.

  3. except that I doubt that a pro-israel govt is going to sprout up in place of Assad.

    While the Neocons might figure that Assad is biding his time to gain some payback for his reactor, and figure that the jihadis who replace him will be more disorganized and prepared,

    that about as good as it would get for them.

    I doubt Israel wants to topple Assad to have him replaced by a Mullah. The Global Neocons elsewhere may well want to, but it would be a short lived victory.

  4. I think that whatever replaces Assad will (1) probably be less hostile to the US and Israel because it will probably be one of their puppets and (2) will be less willing to help Hezbollah in a war with Israel because they would have too much on their plate at home since they would have to form a new government, or because of reason (1).

    My view is that Syria has to go sometime soon (the Neocons been wanting to bomb Syria for almost a decade now, if not more than that) and then the war with Hezbollah has to take place and boy will this be a deadly one.

    Just recently a map has been released by Israel which details supposed "Hezbollah bunker sites." In the Yahoo! article I read it says that there are over 1,000 sites which means that Israel is just psychologically preparing the public for the carpet bombing of Lebanon by releasing this image. Air power didn't seem to have much of an effect in the 2006 war between Israel and Hezbollah in terms of actually preventing rocket attacks against Israel. All airpower mostly accomplished was the mass slaughter of civilians. So as far as I can tell, there is no predicting how the war between Israel and Hezbollah will go, and the only thing that is for sure is that Lebanon will get the hell bombed out of it – no question about that since Israel needs to restore it's deterrence capacity in Lebanon after it lost the 2006 war.

  5. Not surprising, the NPR was just reporting how the Egyptian people have now figured it out that there is no change at all since getting Mubarak out. Same stuff going on, people still being beaten and tortured by those who are now in power.

    I don't think Philip Giraldi is being up front. I think this has been more orchestrated than we know. Giraldi is CIA. How can you believe him? He puts out a touching article about his concerns about the Patriot Act to get us on his side then drops this garbage that the US and Israel did not know any of it was going to happen. I don't believe him. CIA has done experiments on Americans.

  6. The U.S. Government doesn't give a rat's ass for "freedom" in the Middle East. Its rank hypocrisy is obvious for all to see. And, of course, there's "never been heard a discouraging word" about anything Israel, our "51st state," does.

  7. In super MEisrael: we have iphone to SPY..Mossad to assasinate..CIAjor to torture..ABODJalabi'z to Hide U$ money..Banders Eelam for takhdir and a Frame of sad sheeps

    In Umar Quranic States we are all Mujahedoon fi sabeal Tejara with Allah SWT.

  8. Orville is 100% correct. The U.S. doesn't care a handful of sewer rat snot for "freedom" in the Middle East. But I think he is wrong about Israel being our 51st state. Actually, the U.S. govt and congress have become minions of the Israeli knesset. Or to put it another way, the U.S. has become a fawning flunky doing Israel's bidding and providing U.S. taxpayer money for Israeli aggression, targeted assassinations, appropriation of Palestinian water resources, all while laughing and mocking American ignorance and stupidity.
    Guillermo

  9. You make sense

Leave a Reply