Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_25_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the WikiLeaks Guantanamo documents that provide a window into the inner workings of US detention policy; unreliable witnesses who gave evidence against a great many innocent prisoners; the lack of a screening process to separate farmers, old men and boys from the very few actual terrorist suspects; an analysis of the first 200 released prisoners, many previously unknown; how Charlie Savage and the NYT accepted the three 2006 Gitmo suicides at face value, ignoring (the other) Scott Horton’s investigation; the Democrats in Congress who got no support from Barack “I’m going to close Gitmo” Obama; the Al Jazeera cameraman held and questioned for six years about the inside operations at Al Jazeera; broadening the list of “terrorist organizations” to justify holding certain prisoners; and how the US went from the “rule of law” to “the gloves are off, do what you want, there will be no repercussions.”

MP3 here. (18:19)

Andy Worthington writes regularly for newspapers and websites including the Guardian, Truthout, Cageprisoners, and the Future of Freedom Foundation. He writes occasionally for the Daily Star, Lebanon, the Huffington Post, Antiwar.com, CounterPunch, AlterNet, and ZNet. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_22_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the US “democracy building” institutions contributing to the protests in Syria; whether the US government deserves credit for the Arab Spring by playing both sides – minimally funding opposition groups while massively funding dictators; John McCain’s return trip to Libya, this time on the rebel side; the competing factions that make a unified foreign policy based on national interest impossible; summing up Syria policy as “what’s best for Israel;” and how Libya is becoming a Balkan-style quagmire.

MP3 here. (21:13)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Kevin Zeese

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_22_zeese.mp3]

Kevin Zeese, Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace, discusses the successful efforts of activists and alternative media to bring Bradley Manning international attention; the pro-Manning “hecklers” at a pricey Obama fundraising event in San Francisco; the decentralized “democratized media” ready to fill the void left by the thoroughly discredited mainstream media; and the groundbreaking WikiLeaks model of disseminating government information to the public.

MP3 here. (17:55)

Kevin Zeese  is the Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace. He also served as the Executive Director of Democracy Rising, is an attorney, and a long term peace advocate. He took a leave from VotersForPeace for most of 2006 while he was running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland. Zeese was a founding member of the Montgomery County Coalition Against the War in Maryland and has worked with various non-profit organizations on peace, justice, and democracy issues since 1978.

Thomas R. Eddlem

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_21_eddlem.mp3]

Thomas R. Eddlem, freelance writer and contributor to The New American, discusses his article on a Tea Party founder’s legal battles, “Railroading of Walter Reddy: Patriot’s Legally Owned Guns Seized;” the low burden of proof required by the state to take away guns from their law-abiding owners; Reddy’s intent to file an FOIA request to find out why he’s an FBI “person of interest;” how the FBI seems to be profiling conservatives and advocates of alternative currencies in its search for domestic terrorists; and Reddy’s attempt to consult with states interested in using gold and silver as currencies.

MP3 here. (19:37)

Thomas R. Eddlem is a high school history teacher in Southeastern Massachusetts and a freelance writer who contributes to The New American, Examiner.com, AntiWar.com and LewRockwell.com.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_21_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses the grossly inadequate spending cut plans from Democrats and Republicans alike; how the narrow partisan debate on economic issues ignores the fact that both guns and butter are off the table; how the dollar is dying, squeezed from without and within; Congressional Republicans who won’t cut the Pentagon budget for fear of losing defense contracts in their districts; and why the University of Texas endowment fund’s decision to take physical delivery of its gold is a seminal event.

MP3 here. (21:31)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_21_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses Benjamin Netanyahu’s 2007 offer of political favors to Ehud Olmert in exchange for attacking Iran; why an Israeli “solo” attack on Iran would still make the US complicit – requiring a presidential decision to allow it to happen; the pusillanimous tendencies of Barack Obama; and the finally-concluded 2010 National Intelligence Estimate on Iran.

MP3 here. (18:08)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_21_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, editorial assistant at The American Conservative magazine, discusses his article “Exporting Tyranny through Foreign Aid;” the Arab Spring rebellions being put down by autocrats supported by US money and weapons; how NATO intervention has extended the Libyan War and given the rebels an incentive to refuse ceasefire negotiations; how foreign aid is used to achieve policy goals, not for humanitarian purposes; buying up Middle East despots on the (relative) cheap to gain significant influence in regional politics; and the 150 countries (out of around 192 total) that receive some amount of US aid.

MP3 here. (20:17)

John Glaser is an editorial assistant at The American Conservative.

Ahmed Elassy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_20_elassy.mp3]

Ahmed Elassy, Organizer and Public Affairs Director for the Egyptian-International Coalition for Ending the Blockade and Rebuilding Gaza, discusses Hosni Mubarak’s arrest following his brazen public statement denying corruption and threatening to sue those who slandered him; how Egyptians have resolved to bring Mubarak to justice themselves if the military fails to do so; the foreign banks refusing to freeze the Mubarak family’s billions in ill-gotten assets; Ahmed’s meeting with Egypt’s Foreign Minister Dr. Nabil Al-Araby on allowing commercial goods into Gaza and working to open the Rafah crossing permanently; and the billions in Gaza aid sitting idle while the cement and steel needed to rebuild remains blockaded by Israel.

MP3 here. (34:04)

Ahmed Elassy is a dual Egyptian-American citizen who spent his adolescence in Egypt and has lived in Cairo permanently since 1999. As an IT consultant specialized in network security, Mr. Elassy has owned and operated companies in both the US and in Egypt. The child of politically active parents in 1970s Egypt, his political activism includes extensive online work related to the unjust Israeli policies toward Palestinians. Mr. Elassy is currently serving as the Organizer and Public Affairs Director for the Egyptian-International Coalition for Ending the Blockade and Rebuilding Gaza, the main objective of which is to peacefully demand the permanent end of the Egyptian blockade of goods, services and building materials to the Gaza Strip.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_20_wheeler.mp3]

Marcy Wheeler, blogging as “emptywheel” at firedoglake.com, discusses why Bradley Manning’s sudden transfer to Ft. Leavenworth may be the Pentagon’s tacit acknowledgment of his mistreatment; the effective pressure of protesters, foreign governments and the UN special rapporteur on torture; the apparent plan to drive Manning crazy so he is ruled incompetent to participate in his own trial; the DOD’s terrible computer network security and Wired chat logs snitch Adrian Lamo’s questionable credibility; and why the DOJ prefers espionage to whistleblowing.

MP3 here. (20:39)

Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, blogs at firedoglake.com. Marcy grew up bicoastally, starting with every town in NY with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, CA, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal.  Since then, she has lived in Western MA, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, and finally–for the last 12 years–Ann Arbor.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to MI; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton”–a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_20_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses how a NATO defeat in Libya would be political disastrous for Obama and Sarkozy – meaning they’ll fight on til the bitter end; why the US spends trillions fighting little countries of no strategic value; the depth of interference in Syria’s demonstrations by the US, Saudi Arabia and Israel; why the next Syrian potentate probably lives in Virginia right now; fracturing the Arab world into its tribal components so Israel can rule the region; and why Iraq, for the most part, is not better now than under Saddam.

MP3 here. (23:40)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_22_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses his new book  Liberty Defined: 50 Essential Issues That Affect Our Freedom; abandoning the stodgy inside-the-beltway style of campaign management in favor of youtube-style ads put together by his youthful and tech savvy supporters; why increased American pessimism reflects a popular awakening to our deep economic troubles; and why we should be wary of authoritarianism in the guise of “problem solving” politicians.

MP3 here. (11:22)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and End the Fed. His archived columns for Antiwar.com are here.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_19_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses his article “From Waco to Libya: 18 Years of Humanitarian Mass Murder;” the ATF’s “Operation Showtime” raid on the Branch Davidians, designed as a public relations stunt; going from bad to worse at Waco, with the FBI in charge and special forces soldiers set loose on civilians; and the crux of government humanitarianism: killing people in order to save them.

MP3 here. (19:44)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Kirkpatrick Sale

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_19_sale.mp3]

Kirkpatrick Sale, director of the Middlebury Institute, discusses his article “The Sesquicentennial Is Upon Us;” why “War of Southern Secession” and “War Between the States” are more apt descriptions and should be used in place of “Civil War;” the tariff revenue at stake in the fight over Fort Sumter, which newly-independent South Carolina claimed as its own; how Northern industrialists and the Republican Party planned to preserve the union in order to transform the country into a major industrial power, eager to expand westward; how the Emancipation Proclamation was used to fill the Union Army’s ranks and stir up Southern slave rebellions (it did not effect Northern slaves); and the North’s failure to integrate newly freed slaves and compensate slave owners, dooming the South’s economy.

MP3 here. (18:47)

Kirkpatrick Sale is the author of many books, including Secession: How Vermont and All the Other States Can Save Themselves from the Empire. He is the director of the Middlebury Institute and has written for The Nation, Counterpunch and Mother Jones.

Jesse Trentadue

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_19_trentadue.mp3]

Jesse Trentadue, attorney and brother of Kenneth Trentadue (who was probably tortured and killed by FBI agents mistaking him for Richard Lee Guthrie a.k.a. John Doe No. 2 in the wake of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing), discusses the elaborate coverup of Kenneth’s murder while in federal custody; Guthrie’s 1996 “suicide” in a Kentucky jail just before he could fulfill a tell-all plea deal; the many documents dug up by Jesse’s tireless FOIA lawsuits; and the approaching court battle on OKC surveillance tapes that should show Timothy McVeigh and the Ryder truck (and John Doe No. 2?) but instead are missing crucial seconds or just “can’t be found” by the FBI.

MP3 here. (18:03)

Scott’s collection of OKC audio clips here.

Scott’s collection of Jesse Trentadue’s court files here.

Interviews of the late J.D. Cash, Roger Charles, James Ridgeway, Frederic Whitehurst, Rick Ojeda and others on the Oklahoma City Bombing available here.

Jesse Trentadue is an attorney in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_19_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, discusses the pivotal events (Quebec Act, the “shot heard ’round the world“) preceding the Revolutionary War; the persistent myths surrounding the Civil War, southern secession and slavery; how the Union victory transformed the country into a “nation” with a strong central government and budding imperialist ambitions; and the antiwar case for a gold standard monetary system.

MP3 here. (19:17)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

 

Nick Mottern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_18_mottern.mp3]

Nick Mottern, director of Consumers for Peace, discusses his article “Lobbying Report: Drones Fly Through Congress to Enter US Skies;” the technical differences of flying drones in the clear skies of Afghanistan versus the heavily trafficked air corridors in the US; the surefire trickle-down of military technology to civilian law enforcement agencies; the impersonal experience of a remote pilot – whether he is shooting missiles at Pakistanis or playing guard dog along the Canada and Mexico borders; and why drones are not going to win any wars in Asia, even though they are cheap and easy to operate.

MP3 here. (19:33)

Nick Mottern is a reporter and director of Consumers for Peace.org, who has been active in anti-war organizing and has worked for Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, Bread for the World, the former US Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs and The Providence (RI) Journal – Bulletin.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_15_kpfk_porter.mp3]

This recording is from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of April 15th.

In a partial reprisal of his recent Antiwar Radio interview, Gareth Porter discusses Pakistan’s condemnation of out-of-control US drone strikes and espionage in the wake of the Raymond Davis affair; the surprisingly expansive US spy network in Pakistan; targeted drone assassinations that serve little purpose in the “war on terror;” and how a military coup against Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki might help the Pentagon stay in Iraq past the 2011 deadline – unless Moqtada al-Sadr has something to say about it.

MP3 here. (29:30)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

 

Mel Frykberg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_18_frykberg.mp3]

Mel Frykberg, journalist with Inter Press Service, discusses her article, “War Clouds Back Over Gaza;” the escalation of violence with rockets fired into Israel, the assassination of Hamas commanders and the fruitless back-and-forth on “who started it;” Gaza farmers and fishermen shot at while working in “buffer zones;” how Israel’s constant changes to Gaza’s banned goods list confounds NGOs bringing aid; and how a united Palestinian front could force the United Nations or European Union to finally recognize a Palestinian state.

MP3 here. (18:34)

Mel Frykberg writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Noam Sheizaf

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_18_sheizaf.mp3]

Noam Sheizaf, journalist and keeper of the Promised Land blog, discusses his article, “Settlers’ murder investigation turns into collective punishment;” the apartheid system on display as the entire Palestinian village of Awarta is subjected to the whims of an Israeli army murder investigation; the mass arrests, beatings, property destruction and theft that ultimately caught two murder suspects and laid bare the myth of Palestinian independence and self-rule; and how the army protected the Israeli settlers who jumped at the chance to seize more land.

MP3 here. (18:35)

Noam Sheizaf is an independent journalist and editor. He worked for Ha-ir local paper in Tel Aviv, for Ynet.co.il and for Maariv daily paper, where his last post was as a deputy editor of the weekend magazine. His articles have been published at Haaretz, Yedioth Ahronoth, The Nation and other papers and magazines.

Before working as a journalist, Noam served four and a half years in the IDF. He lives and works in Tel Aviv.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_15_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses his article, “Uncle Sam’s big plans for your hard-earned tax dollars;” the two-party “consensus of rascals” on US foreign policy; the “best and brightest” government policymakers who are blinded by arrogance, tunnel vision and echo chambers; and the confusion about whether disastrous foreign policy decisions are made by design, incompetence, or some combination thereof.

MP3 here. (20:12)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

 

Alan J. Kuperman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_15_kuperman.mp3]

Alan J. Kuperman, Associate Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, Austin, discusses his op-ed “False pretense for war in Libya?” in the Boston Globe; how low civilian casualty figures in other recaptured rebel-held cities make the supposedly imminent danger of a Benghazi massacre seem far-fetched; Obama’s misleading quotation of Gadhafi’s “no mercy” comment that was directed at rebel fighters who wouldn’t surrender, not civilians; and why the NATO bombing of retreating loyalist forces and Gadhafi’s hometown has more to do with regime change than protecting civilians.

MP3 here. (9:36)

Alan J. Kuperman is Associate Professor of Public Affairs at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, Austin. Prior to joining the LBJ School faculty in 2005, Kuperman was Resident Assistant Professor of International Relations at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Bologna, Italy.

At the LBJ School, he teaches courses in global policy studies, is Coordinator of the Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Program, and leads a Pentagon-funded project on Constitutional Design and Conflict Management in Africa. He has published articles and book chapters on ethnic conflict, U.S. military intervention and nuclear proliferation.

He also is the author of The Limits of Humanitarian Intervention: Genocide in Rwanda (Brookings, 2001) and co-editor of Gambling on Humanitarian Intervention: Moral Hazard, Rebellion, and Civil War (Routledge, 2006).  He holds a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an M.A. in international relations and international economics from SAIS.  In 2009-2010, he was awarded a fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in Washington, DC.

In addition to his academic experience, Kuperman has been Legislative Director for Congressman Charles Schumer of New York, Legislative Assistant for U.S. House Speaker Thomas Foley, Chief of Staff for Congressman James Scheuer, Senior Policy Analyst for the nongovernmental Nuclear Control Institute, and fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Michael T. Heaney

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_15_heaney.mp3]

Michael T. Heaney, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, discusses his study (with Fabio Rojas) “The Partisan Dynamics of Contention: Demobilization of the Antiwar Movement in the United States, 2007-2009;” how Democrats abandoned the antiwar movement to fawn over the “nonthreatening” Obama; and the on-the-ground research behind the study, consisting of 5,398 surveys of demonstrators at antiwar protests held in major American cities over the course of three years.

MP3 here. (16:57)

Michael T. Heaney is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan.

Prior to joining the faculty of the University of Michigan, Michael received a Ph.D. in Political Science and Public Policy from the University of Chicago in 2004. He held a postdoctoral fellowship at Yale University in 2004-2005. From 2005-2009 he was Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Florida. In 2007-2008, Michael was the William A. Steiger Congressional Fellow of the American Political Science Association, during which time he worked on the staff of the U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Energy and Commerce under Chairman John D. Dingell.

Michael examines the organizational dimensions of American politics. His research focuses on the role of intermediary institutions — especially interest groups, political parties, and social movements — in shaping the political process and policy outcomes. How do these institutions build support, grow over time, and co-evolve with one another? Michael pays particular attention to social network structures in providing answers to these questions. He is engaged in a variety of projects along these lines, including studies of health care lobbying, the contemporary American antiwar movement, the behavior of national convention delegates, and the emergence of the Chicago School of Political Science.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_14_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “Pakistan Moves to Curb More Aggressive US Drone Strikes, Spying;” the expansion of US drone strikes – initially limited to Al Qaeda and Pakistani Taliban – to groups allied with the Pakistani military; why a post-occupation Afghanistan would be far more open to political reconciliation than it is at present; how US economic conditions will force military budget cuts and curtail the “empire of bases;” the cracks appearing in Gen. Petraeus’s carefully groomed PR image that cast doubt on his ambition to high elected office; and the need for a citizens’ movement to end war and empire.

MP3 here. (30:10)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Ahmed Al Omran

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_14_omran.mp3]

Ahmed Al Omran, creator of the Saudi Jeans blog, discusses his Guardian article, “Saudi Arabia unrest: a blogger’s view;” the Shiite protesters in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province seeking the release of political prisoners; the negligible protests in Jeddah and Riyadh; the risks of protesting against the government, considering it has been forbidden by religious edict; why the Saudi monarchy is economically unsustainable long-term, yet still largely respected by the people; and how the internet and social networking help spread ideas in societies where the state keeps strict control of information.

MP3 here. (17:46)

Ahmed Al Omran, creator of the Saudi Jeans blog, was born in al-Ahsa (aka Hofuf), east of Saudi Arabia. Currently, he is pursuing a master degree from the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University, New York. He writes another blog in Arabic, and was an early contributor to Global Voices.

The Saudi Jeans blog aims to provide news, commentary, and personal views on political and social issues in Saudi Arabia, with a special focus on freedom of expression, human rights and women’s rights. In addition to the aforementioned topics, the blog may also cover other things of interest to the writer such as technology, sports, literature, etc.

Matt Southworth

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_14_southworth.mp3]

Matt Southworth, Campaigns Program Assistant at the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL), discusses his transition from Army soldier to peace activist; the work done by the diverse membership of the Friends Committee (they aren’t necessarily Quakers); the Congressional Research Service’s report “The Cost of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Global War on Terror Operations Since 9/11;” how a diversion of war funds for one year could pay off all US state deficits; why it’s hard to calculate the level of Pentagon fraud and waste, while they remain exempt from financial audit; the increased number of generals and high-ranking officers compared to levels during WWII; and why economies based on war are unsustainable and will eventually collapse.

MP3 here. (19:59)

Matt Southworth is the Campaigns Program Assistant at FCNL. Currently, Matt works on Afghanistan policy and greater Middle East issues on Capitol Hill. He has been working closely with a number of Congressional offices in an effort to create a Congressionally led Afghanistan-Pakistan Study Group that will provide President Obama with recommendations moving past the July 2011 transitional phase. Matt also organizes young adults around the country by providing the tools that empower people to influence government through effective lobbying.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_13_escobar.mp3]

Pepe Escobar, Asia Times columnist and author of the article “If the US Doesn’t Pull Every Soldier from Iraq by Midnight, Dec. 31, 2011, Expect Serious Trouble,” discusses the endgame in Iraq, where the US can either acquiesce to the people’s will, or restart the war all over again; how a stable post-occupation Iraq depends on Saudi Arabia not funding/arming another Sunni insurgency; the proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia playing out in the Gulf states; a little lesson on politics and the potential for reform in Algeria and Morocco; how successful democratic transitions in Tunisia and Egypt will encourage reformers in other autocratic ME/NA countries; and the EU divide between neocolonialist France and non-interventionist Germany.

MP3 here. (45:10)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

An extreme traveler, Pepe’s nose for news has taken him to all parts of the globe. He was in Afghanistan and interviewed the military leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Masoud, a couple of weeks before his assassination. Two weeks before September 11, 2001, while Pepe was in the tribal areas of Pakistan, Asia Times Online published his prophetic piece, “Get Osama! Now! Or else …” Pepe was one of the first journalists to reach Kabul after the Taliban’s retreat, and more recently he has explored and reported from Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, US and China.

Ali Gharib

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_13_gharib.mp3]

Ali Gharib, New York-based journalist on U.S. foreign policy and LobeLog writer, discusses the neocon effort to keep war with Iran on the front burner, while the news cycle overwhelms their tired talking points; the old propaganda line that Iranians want us to bomb them, to give them a chance for regime change; the WikiLeaks documents that show Israel’s threats to bomb Iran’s nuclear sites (if the US doesn’t) are just hot air; and how observing the fates of N. Korea and Libya could lead Iran to conclude the best defensive strategy is building nuclear weapons and ceasing negotiations with the West.

MP3 here. (20:53)

Ali Gharib is a New York-based journalist on U.S. foreign policy with a focus on the Middle East and Central Asia. His work has appeared at Inter Press Service, where he was the Deputy Washington Bureau Chief; the Buffalo Beast; Huffington Post; Mondoweiss; Right Web; and Alternet. He holds a Master’s degree in Philosophy and Public Policy from the London School of Economics and Political Science. A proud Iranian-American and fluent Farsi speaker, Ali was born in California and raised in D.C.

Robert P. Murphy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_13_murphy.mp3]

Robert P. Murphy, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, discusses why the old adage “war is good for the economy” is simply not true; the hidden costs in “trickle down” benefits from large government and military expenditures (like the highway system and communications infrastructure); the Obama administration’s inconsistent policy on large government deficits; and how US money creation prompts other countries to follow suit, debasing currencies around the world and leading to speculative bubbles.

MP3 here. (21:01)

Robert P. Murphy is an adjunct scholar of the Mises Institute, where he teaches at the Mises Academy. He runs the blog Free Advice and is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal, and his newest book, Lessons for the Young Economist.

Johann Hari

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_12_hari.mp3]

Johann Hari, columnist for the London Independent, discusses his article, “We’re not being told the truth on Libya;” the weapons deals with Mideast dictators pushed by David Cameron, Nicolas Sarkozy and Barack Obama right up through the “Arab Spring;” the US drone attacks in Pakistan that have killed thousands of civilians, yet failed to elicit calls for a protective no-fly zone like Libya’s; the brutal war in Congo, propelled by western corporations extracting rare earth minerals, that could be stopped without dropping a single bomb; and the deal that sent convicted (rightly or not) Lockerbie bomber Abdel Baset al-Megrahi back to Libya in exchange for BP’s access to Libyan oil.

MP3 here. (17:06)

Johann Hari is a columnist for the London Independent. He has reported from Iraq, Israel/Palestine, the Congo, the Central African Republic, Venezuela, Peru and the US, and his journalism has appeared in publications all over the world, including the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. In 2007 Amnesty International named him Newspaper Journalist of the Year. In 2008 he became the youngest person ever to win Britain’s leading award for political writing, the Orwell Prize. He is also a contributing writer for Slate.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_12_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses the case for anarcho-capitalism – pushing beyond “limited government” to eliminate the last vestiges of “essential” state functions like police, courts and national defense; the possible market alternatives that, while theoretical and uncertain, could only be an improvement on state-run institutions; the disastrous war on drugs that has failed to reduce crime or eliminate drug use – but has boosted and militarized the ranks of law enforcement; and Anthony’s 2006 article, “Law-Enforcement Socialism.”

MP3 here. (18:58)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Rep. Aaron Libby

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_13_libby.mp3]

Rep. Aaron Libby, State Representative of House District 139 in Maine, discusses LD 1305, “An Act To Limit the Use of the National Guard to Situations Specifically Authorized by the United States Constitution;” the growing momentum of Tenth Amendment-based resistance to federal programs like the REAL ID Act and Guard deployments; and why the US Constitution should be amended properly, not changed by simply ignoring particular sections until precedence is set.

MP3 here. (19:26)

Aaron Libby is the Maine State Representative of House District 139, which includes Waterboro and part of Lyman. He has been appointed to serve on the Energy, Utilities and Technology Committee during the 125th Legislature.

Rep. Libby is a farmer on a family owned farm. He has worked for large national corporations and small businesses including audio/video specialist, loss prevention and food preparation. He was selected to the Maine Pomological Societies Executive Committee, selected one out of ten for the United States Apple’s ‘Young Grower’s Intitiative’ in Washington D.C. He is a graduate of Massabesic High School.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_11_morrow.mp3]

Adam Morrow, journalist with IPS News, discusses the renewed Tahrir Square protests in Egypt, where demands are being made for a complete purge of Mubarak’s cronies from the government; evidence of a brewing counterrevolution, where false flag attacks are used to incite violence and discredit the uprising; why the endurance of protesters – who have been waiting 30 years or more for this chance – should not be underestimated; the evolving relations between Egypt, Gaza and Israel; how the US provoked the Hamas-Fatah civil war in Gaza after the wrong party won the 2006 Palestinian election; the media’s characterization of all Israeli violence as retaliatory, and all Palestinian violence as unprovoked; the Egyptian protesters calling for a national referendum on the Camp David Accords outside the Israeli embassy in Cairo; and the uncertain character of Mohamed ElBaradei: is he a genuine reformer or a Western stooge?

MP3 here. (42:13)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Daphne Eviatar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_11_eviatar.mp3]

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the JSOC secret prisons in Afghanistan; the blurred lines between illegal torture and the near-torture allowed by the revised Army Field Manual; the greatly expanded Afghan prison population under Obama; and unfair legal hearings where secret evidence is allowed and no lawyers are provided for the accused – hardly the best strategy for winning the “hearts and minds” of Afghans.

MP3 here. (19:24)

Daphne Eviatar is a lawyer and freelance journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, The Nation, Legal Affairs, Mother Jones, the Washington Independent, HuffingtonPost and many others. She is a Senior Reporter at The American Lawyer, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First and was an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow in 2005 and a Pew International Journalism fellow in 2002.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_11_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the protest letter signed by top US legal scholars – including Obama’s law professor at Harvard – about Bradley Manning’s illegal and immoral conditions of detainment; how Manning is subjected to unnecessary security/suicide prevention measures to punish and vilify him; and the US refusal to allow a private meeting between Manning and the UN representative on torture.

MP3 here. (20:03)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Malalai Joya

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_08_joya.mp3]

Malalai Joya, author of A Woman Among Warlords: The Extraordinary Story of an Afghan Who Dared to Raise Her Voice, discusses her US speaking tour that was initially denied by the State Department because she “lived underground” and was “unemployed;” the bogus reasons for war in Afghanistan, including enforcing women’s rights with a military occupation that regularly kills civilians; and why NATO needs to withdraw, stop supporting the warlords, and let the Afghan people work out their own problems.

MP3 here. (9:32)

Malalai Joya is a (suspended) Member of the Afghan Parliament. She was elected to the 249-seat National Assembly, or Wolesi Jirga in September 2005, as a representative of Farah Province. Malalai won the second highest number of votes in the province.

Malalai rose to fame in December 2003 when, as an elected delegate to the Constitutional Loya Jirga, she spoke out publicly against the domination of warlords (Watch her remarks). Since then she has survived four assassination attempts, and travels in Afghanistan under a burqa and with armed guards.

She is the daughter of a former medical student who was wounded while fighting against the Soviet Union (which invaded and occupied Afganistan from 1979 – 1989). Malalai was 4 years old when her family fled Afghanistan in 1982 to the refugee camps of Iran and then Pakistan. She finished her education in Pakistan and began teaching literacy courses to other women at age 19. After the Soviets left, Malalai Joya returned to Afghanistan in 1998 during the Taliban’s reign. During that time she established an orphanage and health clinic, and was soon a vocal opponent of the Taliban.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_08_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses Rep. Michael McCaul’s (R-Texas) attempt to include Mexican drug cartels in an expanded war on terrorism; the winners on both sides of prohibition, including the cartels that profit from a huge risk premium and the drug and law enforcement agencies that get increased funding and employment; the Washington Post op-ed chiding Mexico for being too proud to “call in the marines;” and how Texas compensates for budget shortfalls: ramp up “asset forfeitures” near borders, where the Fourth Amendment’s protection against unlawful search and seizure apparently doesn’t apply.

MP3 here. (20:11)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_08_kpfk_mcgovern.mp3]

This recording is from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of April 8th. The KPFK archive is here.

In a reprisal of his recent interview, Ray McGovern rehashes the DOJ’s politicized decision to use military tribunals instead of federal court trials for the alleged 9/11 plotters. He also discusses Iraq, Afghanistan and Turkmenistan where the US empire of bases intersects with the “Great Game” of oil and gas resource domination.

MP3 here. (25:35)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_07_morrow.mp3]

Adam Morrow, journalist with IPS News, discusses the divide on Egypt’s March referendum, split along religious lines; the economic crisis that sparked the revolution, and the many other grievances that sustain it; and the upcoming parliamentary and presidential polls that, if conducted fairly, will finally give Egyptians a representative government.

MP3 here. (10:31)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_08_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the internal political pressures on Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki that may prevent him from inviting the US military to stay past 2011; how Obama has joined the Pentagon’s attempt to subvert the Status of Forces Agreement; how Moqtada al-Sadr’s influence may tie Maliki’s hands – whereby acquiescing to US wishes could very well cost him his job; the popular Iraqi outrage about Saudi Arabia’s brutal repression of Bahrain’s Shia majority and its longstanding financial support of militant Iraqi Sunni groups; the possibility of a regional conflagration along religious lines, pitting Iran against Saudi Arabia; and why Iraq’s military – which has close ties with the US military – wants the troop extension and might attempt a coup to make it happen.

MP3 here. (18:14)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Peter Hart

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_08_hart.mp3]

Peter Hart, activism director at Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR), discusses his article “Is There Really a Goldstone ‘Retraction’?” about the media spin-machine working to wipe any traces of Israeli war crimes in Gaza from the minds of Americans; Richard Goldstone’s minor quibbles with the Goldstone Report‘s conclusions, expressed in his Washington Post op-ed, that amount to questioning the existence of a high-level Israeli official policy of intentionally killing civilians (based on information provided by the Israeli military’s self-investigation); the significant (and seemingly effective) pressure from Israel supporters brought to bear on Goldstone; and the report’s significant evidence of Israeli war crimes that remains unchallenged – including targeting civilian infrastructure and using white phosphorous.

MP3 here. (19:22)

Peter Hart is the activism director at FAIR. He writes for FAIR’s magazine Extra, and is also a co-host and producer of FAIR’s syndicated radio show CounterSpin. He is the author of The Oh Really? Factor: Unspinning Fox News Channel’s Bill O’Reilly.

Hart has been interviewed by a number of media outlets, including NBC Nightly News, Fox News Channel’s O’Reilly Factor, the Los Angeles Times, Newsday and the Associated Press. He has also appeared on Showtime and in the movie Outfoxed.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_07_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, member of Veterans For Peace and former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses why Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s military tribunal may hide 9/11 motives; contesting the “they attacked us for our freedom” explanation for 9/11; evidence from Dick Cheney and the 9/11 Commission that unconditional US support for Israel motivates terrorism; the Washington Post’s revisionist interpretation of KSM’s motivation as a response to negative personal experiences in America; and the real reason Congress is dead-set against federal trials for 9/11 plotters: the ensuing national news coverage connecting the dots between US foreign policy, support for Israel and terrorism.

MP3 here. (37:12)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Malou Innocent

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_07_innocent.mp3]

Malou Innocent, Foreign Policy Analyst at the Cato Institute, discusses her article, “Protests in Afghanistan: Our Excuse to Get Out;” how we underestimate the Afghan resentment of our intrusion into their lives and culture; why Western-style democracy is not the end all, be all political solution for much of the world; and the myriad forces that make ending the Afghan War all but impossible: establishing a Central Asia client state, keeping the military busy, bureaucratic inertia, and a domestic political culture that equates peace with weakness.

MP3 here. (18:54)

Malou Innocent is a Foreign Policy Analyst at the Cato Institute. She is a member of the International Institute of Strategic Studies, and her primary research interests include Middle East and Persian Gulf security issues and U.S. foreign policy toward Pakistan, Afghanistan, and China. She has appeared as a guest analyst on CNN, BBC News, Fox News Channel, Al Jazeera, Voice of America, CNBC Asia, and Reuters.

Innocent has published reviews and articles on national security and international affairs in journals such as Survival, Congressional Quarterly, and Harvard International Review. She has also written for Foreign Policy, Wall Street Journal Asia, Christian Science Monitor, Armed Forces Journal, the Guardian, Huffington Post, the Washington Times, and other outlets both in the United States and overseas. She earned dual Bachelor of Arts degrees in Mass Communications and Political Science from the University of California at Berkeley, and a Master of Arts degree in International Relations from the University of Chicago.

Randall Amster

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_05_amster.mp3]

Randall Amster, Peace Studies teacher at Prescott College and Executive Director of the Peace & Justice Studies Association, discusses his CommonDreams article “Looking for Mr. Goodwar? Consider a ‘Truth Surge’ Instead;” why wars are fought for strategic interests, not moral imperatives, despite what the politicians say; selling wars to the public with used-car salesman bait and switch tactics; and the popularity of peace – the problem being a lack of agreement on how to achieve it.

MP3 here. (19:30)

Randall Amster, J.D., Ph.D., teaches Peace Studies and chairs the Master’s program in Humanities at Prescott College. He is the Executive Director of the Peace & Justice Studies Association, and serves as Contributing Editor for New Clear Vision. Among his recent books are Lost in Space: The Criminalization, Globalization, and Urban Ecology of Homelessness, and the co-edited volume Building Cultures of Peace: Transdisciplinary Voices of Hope and Action.

Robert Parry

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_05_parry.mp3]

Robert Parry, founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com, discusses the lesson on blowback learned from US meddling in the Soviet war on Afghanistan, applied to the current war in Libya; arming unknown rebel groups for short-term policy goals, without considering the long-term consequences; the tough-guy posturing competitions among pundits and politicians that result in military solutions for every kind of problem; and why the Lockerbie bombing – often cited with a litany of other offenses committed by the Gaddafi regime – may or may not have been a Libyan operation.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Robert Parry is an investigative journalist who won the George Polk Award in 1984 for reporting on the Iran-Contra affair and uncovering Oliver North’s involvement in it. He is the founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com and author of Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush, Trick or Treason: The October Surprise Mystery and Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.

Shaukat Qadir

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_05_qadir.mp3]

Shaukat Qadir, retired Pakistani Army brigadier and university instructor, discusses his CounterPunch article, “How Anarchy Beats Out Tradition: Two or Three Things You Need to Know About Afghanistan;” how Afghanistan’s traditional tribal system has been gradually destroyed over the last 30 years; the brief egalitarian period of Taliban rule before Osama bin Laden’s influence wrought a draconian enforcement of social and religious customs; the strange bedfellows in Afghanistan’s incredibly profitable heroin trade; Lieutenant General Mahmud Ahmed’s alleged donation to the 9/11 hijackers and his jockeying for Pervez Musharraf’s job; how US forces could have really liberated a ready-and-willing Afghanistan, if not for their overweening arrogance; why Pakistan is not too worried about Indian influence in Afghanistan, contra Eric Margolis; President Obama’s lack of fortitude on demanding that the military end the war; and why “they” hate us: not for our freedom (which has all but evaporated), but for taking away their freedom.

MP3 here. (29:21)

Shaukat Qadir is a retired brigadier and a former president of the Islamabad Policy Research Institute.

Antoinette Bonsignore

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_04_bonsignore.mp3]

Antoinette Bonsignore, a regular blogger for NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, discusses her truthout article, “The Military’s Rape and Sexual Assault Epidemic;” the harassment and threats heaped on military rape victims – men and women – who dare to report the crimes; the culture of impunity for offenders, aided by a woefully deficient (by design) investigative and oversight apparatus; the class action lawsuit brought against Donald Rumsfeld and Robert Gates for their failure to address the problem; and how you can take action to make the military accountable for sexual assaults within the ranks.

MP3 here. (18:44)

Antoinette Bonsignore, J.D., is a Seattle based workers’ rights advocate most recently focused on worker compensation issues. She is a regular blogger for NARAL Pro-Choice Washington. She lives in Redmond, WA.

Michael Scheuer

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_04_scheuer.mp3]

Michael Scheuer, 22-year veteran of the CIA and former head analyst at the CIA’s bin Laden unit, discusses the First Amendment’s non-universality as recently evidenced in Afghanistan – yet another reminder of the dangers in foreign occupations; the choice confronting Americans: pursue the same foreign policy and get endless war or step back and let Islamic countries fight amongst themselves and against Israel; why the current system of government is pointless, so long as it fails to put US interests first; UN Ambassador Susan Rice, President Obama and other “true believers” in spreading secular democracy at gunpoint; using the conflicts in Syria and Bahrain to provoke Iran militarily, and get the US into a backdoor war; and the 21st century imperialism redux that has the US, Britain and France bombing Libya.

MP3 here. (16:09)

Michael Scheuer is a 22-year veteran of the CIA and former head analyst at the CIA’s bin Laden unit. He is the author of Osama Bin Laden, Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq and Imperial Hubris: Why the West is Losing the War on Terror.

Scheuer has a website and writes for The Diplomat and Antiwar.com.

Charles Featherstone

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_04_featherstone.mp3]

Charles Featherstone, regular writer at LewRockwell.com, discusses his disagreement with Eric Margolis‘s doubts about the legitimacy of Libya’s (initial) uprising; how tribal groups within modern states (like Saudi Arabia and Libya) function as “intermediate institutions” that provide a protective barrier between individuals and unbridled state power; how tribal negotiations with Gaddafi could have prevented a Benghazi massacre – without Western intervention; why the CIA’s obvious infiltration of Libya’s rebels does not mean the whole uprising was a covert operation; looking ahead to nation building in yet another country without even rudimentary civil institutions; and a prediction that Israel will step back from the brink of an “extermination” solution to the Palestinian problem.

MP3 here. (17:39)

Charles H. Featherstone is a seminarian, essayist and songwriter currently living in Chicago. He writes regularly for LewRockwell.com.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_04_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the right-wing judges on the DC Circuit Court who think prisoners can be detained indefinitely with no evidence and who habitually reverse lower court decisions on Guantanamo habeas petitions; why today’s Supreme Court would either deadlock or rule differently on Boumediene v. Bush; the 15-month ban on releasing Yemeni Guantanamo prisoners, due entirely to their nationality; getting fed up and depressed after 5 years of Gitmo coverage, including 2 years of the “hope and change” Obama administration; and Attorney General Eric Holder’s announcement that suspected 9/11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed will not get a federal trial, after all.

MP3 here. (16:54)

Andy Worthington writes regularly for newspapers and websites including the Guardian, Truthout, Cageprisoners, and the Future of Freedom Foundation. He writes occasionally for the Daily Star, Lebanon, the Huffington Post, Antiwar.com, CounterPunch, AlterNet, and ZNet. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_01_kpfk_margolis.mp3]

This recording is from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of April 1st. The KPFK archive is here.

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses why the Libyan War could mark the beginning of a counterrevolutionary response to the “Arab Spring;” why Syria’s uprising – though based on legitimate grievances – may have been instigated by the US and Israel; the spectacle of watching Libya’s rag-tag rebels drive patchwork vehicles across the desert, somewhat resembling characters in a Mad Max movie; the even greater spectacle of watching NATO forces kill Libyan civilians in a campaign to prevent the killing of Libyan civilians; why Arabian Peninsula-based Al Qaeda franchises are bit players in global terrorism; and the large number of foreign workers in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain who potentially threaten the stability of their despotic hosts.

MP3 here. (25:32)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Doug Weir

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_01_weir.mp3]

Dour Weir of the Campaign Against Depleted Uranium discusses the likelihood that depleted uranium weapons are being used in Libya; the DU rounds commonly used by A-10 and Harrier jets against armored targets; the long lasting health risks from dust and chemical toxicity; and why the military seems to be slowly shifting away from DU weapons.

MP3 here. (19:04)

Doug Weir is a Development Worker for the Campaign Against Depleted Uranium and the International Coordinator for the International Coalition to Ban Uranium Weapons (ICBUW). He holds a degree in Geology and a post-graduate degree in Journalism.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_01_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX), author of Liberty Defined: 50 Essential Issues That Affect Our Freedom, discusses the slow escalation and deepening US commitment in Libya; why Hillary Clinton and the rest of the Obama administration, not Congress, ultimately control the government’s purse-strings; and how a failed impeachment vote (and it would definitely fail) on Obama’s unconstitutional war in Libya would effectively empower him further.

MP3 here. (10:22)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and End the Fed. His archived columns for Antiwar.com are here.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_01_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses his article, “America’s Peacetime Crimes against Iraq,” a review of Joy Gordon’s book Invisible War: The United States and the Iraq Sanctions; the slow death of Iraqis from entirely preventable diseases and malnutrition during the 1990-2003 sanctions; the double-whammy of an international blockade and UN-administered economic central planning; the Clinton administration’s focus on regime change, not disarmament, as a condition for dropping sanctions; and why the collective punishment of Iraqi civilians – in order to provoke an uprising against Saddam Hussein – is aptly described as terrorism.

MP3 here. (18:28)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Karen Greenberg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_01_greenberg.mp3]

Karen Greenberg, executive director of the New York University Center on Law and Security, discusses her TomDispatch article, “America’s Growing Intolerance:
How ‘Enemy Creep’ Is Guantanamo-izing America
;” the mainstream American pastime of reviling Muslims and misunderstanding jihad; calling out intolerance to correct misplaced blame, not to scold politically incorrect speech; why “humanitarianism” and “democracy” are just words that give the US a blank check for militarism; and a federal judge’s effective endorsement of torture during the sentencing of Ahmed Ghailani, who was convicted on 1 of 284 counts related to the 1998 Africa embassy bombings.

MP3 here. (18:23)

Karen Greenberg is the executive director of the New York University Center on Law and Security, the author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo’s First One Hundred Days, and editor of The Torture Debate in America.