Mike German

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_16_german.mp3]

Michael German, Policy Counsel for the ACLU’s Washington Legislative Office and former FBI Special Agent, discusses new and expanded FBI powers granted through lax Attorney General guidelines, that allow them to investigate any American for any (or no) reason without opening an official case and creating a paper trail, how we lost the protections put in place after Hoover era abuses and are back to persecuting groups based on their political beliefs and why giving law enforcement extra authority leads to more abuses, not more effective policing.

MP3 here. (9:39)

Michael German is a Policy Counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington Legislative Office. Prior to joining the ACLU German served sixteen-years as a Special Agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, where he specialized in domestic terrorism and covert operations.

German currently serves as an adjunct professor for Law Enforcement and Terrorism at the National Defense University and is a Senior Fellow with GlobalSecurity.org. German is the author of Thinking Like a Terrorist, which was published in January 2007. German has a B.A. in Philosophy from Wake Forest University and a J.D. from Northwestern University Law School.

William J. Astore

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_16_astore.mp3]

William Astore, professor of history at the Pennsylvania College of Technology, discusses his TomDispatch piece “American Militarism is Not a Fairy Tale,” how civilian control of the military is falling out of favor, especially among Republican chickenhawks, military budget cuts off the table through 2012, thanks to Democrats afraid of being labeled “soft” on anything, the blurred line between civilian (CIA) and military operations, how Gen. Petraeus made his own foreign policy by making a media case for an Afghan surge in 2009 (which would have got him fired in another era) and how Ron Paul’s presidential candidacy gives Americans a real choice between republic and empire – for the first time in a century.

MP3 here. (19:56)

William J. Astore, a retired lieutenant colonel (USAF), has taught at the Air Force Academy and the Naval Postgraduate School. He teaches history at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. He is co-author of Hindenburg: Icon of German Militarism.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_13_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses his LRC article “Obama Gets it Half Right,” the diminishing returns of government “stimulus” deficit spending, Bernanke’s additional job duty: juice up the stock market, why we need higher interest rates (but the decision and power to do so should not be centrally planned), the Fed as last buyer of Treasury debt, and now the largest holder, and the foreign policy implications of bad economic policy: increased militarism by desperate politicians trying to distract the public from the actual problems.

MP3 here. (19:56)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_13_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “90% of Petraeus’s Captured ‘Taliban’ Were Civilians,” fact checking Afghan War statistics to prove US claimed gains were illusory; the maze of US, JSOC, NATO jails and prisons, Petraeus’s effective PR blitz in late 2010 that pushed back withdrawal to 2014 and beyond and the expectation for a summer drawdown.

MP3 here. (19:40)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_15_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, news editor of Antiwar.com, discusses the Yemeni protests with Saleh out of the country, the limited authority of what’s left of the state there, the de-facto autonomy of the northern and southern provinces; US policy on Yemen from pre-Christmas day bomber to the present: a microcosm of the war on terrorism’s counter-productivity, increasing escalation of drone strikes and US citizen Anwar al-Awlaki’s unilateral death sentence imposed by Obama for exercising his free speech rights and (possibly) being associated with al Qaeda.

MP3 here. (21:27)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_15_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses the Assad regime’s deep entrenchment throughout Syrian society (good luck overthrowing it), the foreign governments behind some opposition groups, Israeli strategy: stir up trouble in multi-factioned Arab states and let infighting leave them as the last strong state standing; US intervention in Libya: humanitarian effort or Arab spring counterrevolution and why Iraq’s government will indeed invite the US to stay past year’s end.

MP3 here. (20:10)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Patrick Cockburn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_13_cockburn.mp3]

Patrick Cockburn discusses recent moves by the administration to try to stay in Iraq and why their presence will remain a politically divisive issue – there if not here, the very small number of members of al Qaeda in Yemen, why NATO, not the Libyan rebels, will fill the power vacuum created when Gadhafi is eventually ousted, skirmishes in Libya where the media outnumber the fighters (on both sides), the bin Laden/al Qaeda strategy of provoking the U.S. to invade and occupy the Middle East to overextend and bring down the empire, the modest demands of Bahraini Shia for a constitutional monarchy which was met by a brutal government response, Obama’s farcical “mediation” in Bahrain, and why, unfortunately, “repression works,” meaning the Arab Spring faces huge challenges.

MP3 here. (40:13)

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent, has been visiting Iraq since 1978. He was awarded the 2005 Martha Gellhorn prize for war reporting in recognition of his writing on Iraq. He is the author of, his memoir, The Broken Boy (Jonathan Cape, 2005), and with Andrew Cockburn, Saddam Hussein: An American Obsession (Verso, The Occupation: War, Resistance and Daily Life in Iraq (Verso, 2006) and Muqtada: Muqtada al-Sadr, the Shia revival and the Struggle for Iraq.

David Krieger

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_10_krieger.mp3]

David Krieger, president of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, discusses the 20,000+ nuclear weapons still around (almost all in US and Russia), the only 4 countries with deployed nukes (US, Britain, Russia,France); how nuke levels are decreasing, but not across the board and not nearly fast enough, why the new START treaty is really only a start, why the US has a moral obligation to pursue nuclear disarmament and a couple of flaws in the “deterrence” and MAD doctrines.

MP3 here. (17:25)

Dr. David Krieger is a founder of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation and has served as its president since 1982. He is the author or editor of 15 books and hundreds of articles. He has lectured throughout the United States, Europe and Asia on issues of peace, security, international law, and the abolition of nuclear weapons. He is a Councilor of the World Future Council and his latest book is The Challenge of Abolishing Nuclear Weapons.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_10_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses his micro-fundraiser – give a few bucks to the world’s best Guantanamo reporter why dontcha? – Andy’s very brief employ with NYT in 2008; the unknown Gitmo prisoners, the travesty of military commissions instead of federal court trials for KSM et al; Obama’s tour of Britain where he was treated like a demigod while still holding Brits in Guantanamo, his refusal to deal with Bush “legacy” issues like Gitmo, trials, torture and law with the likely consequence that all will become established precedent.

MP3 here. (32:20)

Andy Worthington writes regularly for newspapers and websites including the Guardian, Truthout, Cageprisoners, and the Future of Freedom Foundation. He writes occasionally for the Daily Star, Lebanon, the Huffington Post, Antiwar.com, CounterPunch, AlterNet, and ZNet. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_10_wheeler.mp3]

Marcy Wheeler, blogging as “emptywheel” at firedoglake.com, discusses the unraveling of the federal government’s case against Thomas Drake, the NSA whistleblower charged with espionage but then let off with a misdemeanor charge, the substance of Drake’s whistleblowing about wasteful and privacy-destroying outsourcing of wiretapping, why it’s now safer to leak on the record, using your name, than doing in anonymously and Obama’s attempt to reinvent the Espionage Act for broad use, esp. on those who expose wrongdoing in government.

MP3 here. (19:55)

Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, blogs at firedoglake.com. Marcy grew up bicoastally, starting with every town in NY with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, CA, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal.  Since then, she has lived in Western MA, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, and finally–for the last 12 years–Ann Arbor.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to MI; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton”–a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_09_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses the book Philip Dru: Administrator: A Story of Tomorrow by Col. Edward Mandell House (for which Will wrote the forward), the political operator behind Woodrow Wilson, the book’s proposal for a corporate-state co-administered government, which as House himself boasted “anticipated” Benito Mussolini’s fascist Italy, House’s legacy in the FRD administrations and modern Democratic and Republican parties, and Gabriel Kolko’s Triumph of Conservatism.

MP3 here. (19:56)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse. Archives of his Pro Libertate Radio show on the Liberty News Radio Network can be found here.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_09_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer and Antiwar.com contributor Philip Giraldi discusses his new article “Target Iran,” the bogus RAND paper claiming Iran could have a nuke in months and somehow under the IAEA’s nose contrasted with Sy Hersh‘s New Yorker piece on the 2011 NIE, the Ha’aretz article showing more Israeli threats to attack Iran, which would draw in the U.S. timed before September to kill the bid for a Palestinian at the UN.

MP3 here. (20:09)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Doug Bandow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_09_bandow.mp3]

Doug Bandow, senior fellow at the Cato Institute, explains why Obama is among the most flagrant violators of the constitution’s delineation of the war powers, the uncertainty of Gadhafi’s successors in Libya, if and when he is ousted, why Obama needs to wrap up Libya before election season starts while not having the political capital to send in ground troops to take Tripoli, and why the US is (hopefully) too busy to intervene in Syria or Pakistan.

MP3 here. (18:04)

Doug Bandow is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, specializing in foreign policy and civil liberties. He worked as special assistant to President Reagan and editor of the political magazine Inquiry. He writes regularly for leading publications such as Fortune magazine, National Interest, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Times. Bandow speaks frequently at academic conferences, on college campuses, and to business groups. Bandow has been a regular commentator on ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox News Channel, and MSNBC. He holds a J.D. from Stanford University.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_09_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, news editor of Antiwar.com discusses the wounded flight of Yemen’s dictator Saleh as the country falls apart, sorting out different factions, tribes and student groups, the US call for Saleh to step down, not in support of democratic reform, but because he is no longer an effectively brutal autocrat, the US campaign of recent air strikes al Qaeda targets, the Golan Heights protests, why casualties reflect Israel’s great concern about large peaceful protests; and Syria’s increasingly unstable government amid huge protests.

MP3 here. (19:50)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Anand Gopal

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_08_gopal.mp3]

Independent journalist Anand Gopal discusses the American creation of an unsustainable Afghanistan that’s guaranteed to collapse when US/NATO money stops flowing, anticipating the 2017 date when Afghan troops are trained and they can stand up (after 16 years!), the fact that US strategy still depends on warlords to compete for influence and power with Taliban, the deaths of Saleem Shahzad and Osama bin Laden, the coming major Taliban offensive this summer with spike in violence, and the fact that Afghan corruption gets worse as foreign aid increases.

MP3 here. (18:52)

Anand Gopal has reported in Afghanistan for the Christian Science Monitor and the Wall Street Journal.  His dispatches can be read at AnandGopal.com. He is currently working on a book about the Afghan war.

Daphne Eviatar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_08_eviatar.mp3]

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses her recent report about the shoddy and lawless process for dealing with detainees at Bagram prison in Afghanistan, the secret JSOC prison nearby, the huge numbers of people swept up in night raids and the many at Bagram arrested on accusations from informers who use US to settle tribal/personal vendettas.

MP3 here. (20:11)

Daphne Eviatar is a lawyer and freelance journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, The Nation, Legal Affairs, Mother Jones, the Washington Independent, HuffingtonPost and many others. She is a Senior Reporter at The American Lawyer, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First and was an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow in 2005 and a Pew International Journalism fellow in 2002.

Paul Mutter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_08_mutter.mp3]

Paul Mutter, author of the article “The War Against al-Jazeera” at Foreign Policy in Focus, Sami al-Hajj, the journalist held for years in Guantanamo and questioned for intel on news gathering operations, WikiLeaks release of internal Gitmo documents on Hajj and where we’ve found ourselves after trading liberty for security for the last decade.

MP3 here. (18:22)

Paul Mutter is a graduate student at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at NYU and a contributor to Foreign Policy In Focus and The Arabist.

Peter Van Buren

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_08_vanburen.mp3]

Peter Van Buren, former State Department Foreign Service Officer in Iraq, discusses his tomdispatch article “How Not to Withdraw from Iraq;” failing to win hearts and minds in Iraq, despite good intentions; how goodwill infrastructure projects like building schools and drinking water facilities were squandered in a money pit of graft and fraud; Hillary Clinton’s chance to play commander in chief of her own State Department mercenary army; and the two very different tiers of mercenaries (low-paid cannon fodder from Uganda and Peru, and high-paid bullies from America, Britain and S. Africa).

MP3 here. (21:42)

Peter Van Buren spent a year in Iraq as a State Department Foreign Service Officer serving as Team Leader for two Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs). Now in Washington, he writes about Iraq and the Middle East at his blog, We Meant Well. His book, We Meant Well: How I Helped Lose the Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Iraqi People, will be published this September.

Robert Higgs

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_07_higgs.mp3]

Robert Higgs, senior fellow at the Independent Institute and author of Crisis and Leviathan, discusses his cherished yet under-appreciated chapter 3 in Crisis and Leviathan, about the rational ideological motivation of collective action; beating back the pervasive myth that war stimulates and improves the economy; how the increase in US GDP following massive post-WWII cuts in government spending undermines Keynesian economic theory; and why there is no such thing as free money: government spending is either derived from direct taxation or by debasing the dollar.

MP3 here. (18:37)

Robert Higgs is Senior Fellow in Political Economy for The Independent Institute and Editor of the Institute’s quarterly journal The Independent Review. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, and he has taught at the University of Washington, Lafayette College, Seattle University, and the University of Economics, Prague. He has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University and Stanford University, and a fellow for the Hoover Institution and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Higgs is the editor of The Independent Institute books Opposing the Crusader State, The Challenge of Liberty, Re-Thinking Green, Hazardous to Our Health? and Arms, Politics, and the Economy, plus the volume Emergence of the Modern Political Economy.

His authored books include Neither Liberty Nor Safety, Depression, War, and Cold War, Politická ekonomie strachu (The Political Economy of Fear, in Czech), Resurgence of the Warfare State, Against Leviathan, The Transformation of the American Economy 1865-1914, Competition and Coercion, and Crisis and Leviathan. A contributor to numerous scholarly volumes, he is the author of more than 100 articles and reviews in academic journals.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_07_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, member of Veterans For Peace and former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses his article “Gen. Keane Keen on Attacking Iran;” the US intelligence analysts who stuck to their guns on the 2007 and 2011 Iran NIE‘s, possibly preventing a war; internal division in the Bush administration on Iraq War strategy, with Rumsfeld and the Iraq Study Group (James Baker and Lee Hamilton) advocating drawdown, and Fred Kagan and Gen. Keane promoting a surge; and the changing of the guard in 2007, as the ambitious Gen. Petraeus displaced Generals Casey and Abizaid.

MP3 here. (19:54)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

 

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_07_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article on Syed Saleem Shahzad, “Slain Writer’s Book Says US-NATO War Served al-Qaeda Strategy;” al-Qaeda’s successful plan to draw the US to Afghanistan and keep them there, slowly bleeding the empire dry like the Soviets before; why Osama bin Laden was never more than a figurehead, while Egyptian Ayman al-Zawahiri remains the real strategist of al-Qaeda; and how Pakistan’s tribal regions have been radicalized, furthering al-Qaeda’s goal of winning Pakistan itself.

MP3 here. (8:28)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_07_vlahos.mp3]

Kelley B. Vlahos, featured Antiwar.com columnist and contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine, discusses her article “DoD Dodges Deadly Dust Data” about U.S Navy medical researcher Capt. Mark Lyles’s study of Iraq’s toxic dust; Iraq’s unique blend of naturally occurring heavy metals and bacteria with man made toxic burn pits and depleted uranium; the increase of neurological and respiratory illnesses among soldiers, without any definitive studies explaining why (because the DoD doesn’t want one); and the rather boring CNAS conference (Democrat version of PNAC) where unelected Washington insiders formulate US policy and profit from the military industrial complex.

MP3 here. (28:27)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos has spent over a decade as a political reporter in Washington DC. Currently, she is a contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine and its daily weblog, @TAC. She is also a Washington correspondent for the DC-based homeland security magazine, Homeland Security Today, a long-time political writer for FOXNews.com, a regular columnist for Antiwar.com and a contributor to CriminalJustice.Change.org

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_06_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, foreign correspondent and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses Yemen President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s (permanent?) departure to Saudi Arabia for medical care; the US in damage-control mode in Yemen, protecting the existing power structure as in Egypt; the tribal conflicts and secessionist movements threatening to tear Yemen apart; the dozen or so actual al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula members; how Bahrain crushed internal protests with US and Saudi-financed troops; and the NY Times’s favorable treatment of Israel on the massacre of protesters in the Golan Heights.

MP3 here. (20:01)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Hillary Mann Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_06_leverett.mp3]

Hillary Mann Leverett, former State Department official and co-founder of The Race For Iran, discusses her article “Misrepresenting the Iran-Al-Qa’ida ‘Connection;'” how US hardball diplomacy with Iran squandered an opportunity to acquire al-Qaeda’s “next bin Laden” Saif al-Adel; why the US protected the MEK even though the group was on the State Department’s terrorism list and fought with Saddam’s regime against US troops in Iraq; Iran’s cooperation with the US on terrorism issues (both countries had grievances against al-Qaeda), including official talks between 2001-03; Iran’s problems repatriating Egyptians and bin Laden family members capturing after fleeing Afghanistan; and how the US media misleads Americans into believing Iran supports al-Qaeda.

MP3 here. (20:08)

Hillary Mann Leverett has more than 20 years of academic, legal, business, diplomatic, and policy experience working on Middle Eastern issues. In the George W. Bush Administration, she worked as Director for Iran, Afghanistan and Persian Gulf Affairs at the National Security Council, Middle East expert on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and Political Advisor for Middle East, Central Asian and African issues at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations. From 2001-2003, she was one of a small number of U.S. diplomats authorized to negotiate with the Iranians over Afghanistan, al-Qa’ida and Iraq. In the Clinton Administration, Leverett also served as Political Advisor for Middle East, Central Asian and African issues for the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, Associate Director for Near Eastern Affairs at the National Security Council, and Special Assistant to the Ambassador at the U.S. embassy in Cairo. She was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship and a Watson Fellowship, and in 1990-1991 worked in the U.S. embassies in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Egypt and Israel, and was part of the team that reopened the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait after the first Gulf War.

Ms. Leverett has published extensively on Iran as well as on other Middle Eastern, Central and South Asian, and Russian issues. She has spoken about U.S.-Iranian relations at Harvard, MIT, the National Defense University, NYU, the Norwegian Institute for International Affairs, and major research centers in China. She has appeared on news and public affairs programs on BBC, CNN, MSNBC, and Al Jazeera (Arabic and English), and was featured in the highly acclaimed BBC documentary, Iran and the West. Along with Flynt Leverett, she appeared in the PBS Frontline documentary, “Showdown With Iran”, and was profiled in Esquire magazine. She has provided expert testimony to the U.S. House Government Reform and Oversight Committee.

Ms. Leverett is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Brandeis University. She also studied at the American University in Cairo and Tel Aviv University.

David Swanson

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_06_swanson.mp3]

David Swanson, author of War is a Lie, discusses the October 6th event (don’t call it a rally) in Washington’s Freedom Plaza, modeled on Egypt’s Tahrir Square revolution; how to get the MoveOn crowd interested in war/peace issues again, instead of public school lunch menus; and the benefits of bringing our war money home, diverting 1+ trillion/year away from the military industrial complex.

MP3 here. (13:11)

David Swanson is Co-Founder of WarIsACrime.org (formerly After Downing Street), creator of ProsecuteBushCheney.org, Washington Director of Democrats.com and a board member of Progressive Democrats of America, the Backbone Campaign, Voters for Peace and the Liberty Tree Foundation for the Democratic Revolution. He was the press secretary for Dennis Kucinich’s 2004 presidential campaign, media coordinator for the International Labor Communications Association, and worked three years as communications coordinator for ACORN, the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now.

John Lindsay-Poland

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_06_poland.mp3]

John Lindsay-Poland, research and advocacy director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, discusses his article “Pentagon Using Drug Wars as Excuse to Build Bases in Latin America;” how using the military to fight the war on drugs only succeeds in increasing the level of violence; the range of options between current drug policy and outright legalization; how the drug crackdown has guaranteed the most ruthless individuals rise to the top of the black market; and the chorus of voices from the Mexican peace movement and victims of drug violence, speaking out against the military response to drug trafficking.

MP3 here. (20:52)

John Lindsay-Poland is research and advocacy director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation,  and author of Emperors in the Jungle: The Hidden History of the U.S. in Panama.

Chase Madar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_03_madar.mp3]

Chase Madar, member of the National Lawyers Guild, discusses his American Conservative Magazine article “Torture’s Comeback;” the US torture lobby’s attempt to credit enhanced interrogation, conducted between 2003-2006, for bin Laden’s location and execution in 2011; the growing American appetite for torture (10 years after 9/11) especially among moderates, the evangelical right, establishment liberals, and the Cheney family; why torture is the most effective at producing false confessions and lying a country into war; the torture regime’s roots in domestic criminal justice and the war on drugs; and the competing claims of anti-torture interrogator Matthew Alexander and pro-torture Bush administration speechwriter Marc Thiessen.

MP3 here. (20:03)

Chase Madar is an attorney in New York and a member of the National Lawyers Guild. He writes for TomDispatch, the American Conservative magazine, Le Monde Diplomatique, and the London Review of Books.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_03_morrow.mp3]

Adam Morrow, journalist with IPS News, discusses the continuing protests (with declining turnout) in Egypt; the constitutional clash between Islamic groups and secular parties/Coptic Christians on the deference to Islamic law in legislation; why the army will allow elections and civilian government to take hold (barring civil war or a big escalation in violence); widespread opposition to the 1979 Camp David agreement; why the Muslim Brotherhood’s recognition as a legitimate political power will not usher in a global Islamic caliphate; slow progress on opening the Rafah Gaza border crossing; and suspicions that Mahmoud Abbas is asking Egypt to keep the border closed.

MP3 here. (19:47)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Emma Cape

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_03_cape.mp3]

Emma Cape, member of Courage to Resist, discusses the Bradley Manning support rally at Ft. Leavenworth on Saturday, June 4; the end of Manning’s mistreatment in custody, thanks to the persistence of demonstrators, writers and activists coming to his defense; and the misuse of the Espionage Act against Manning, who’s being treated like a spy instead of a whistleblower.

MP3 here. (8:21)

Emma Cape is a member of Courage to Resist.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_03_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses the two competing bills on Libya – Dennis Kucinich’s legally binding demand for withdrawal and John Boehner’s nonbinding suggestion that Obama seek Congress’s approval, eventually; the rising antiwar sentiment among Americans, reflected but not necessarily shared by their representatives in Congress; why the new 2011 National Intelligence Estimate on Iran should be declassified; the unyielding US foothold in Iraq; and the Fed bailout money that went to foreign banks, plus more shenanigans blacked out in the Fed’s document dump.

MP3 here. (10:47)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of Liberty Defined: 50 Essential Issues That Affect Our Freedom, The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and End the Fed. His archived columns for Antiwar.com are here.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_02_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses Murray Rothbard’s book Wall Street, Banks, and American Foreign Policy (with an introduction by Anthony Gregory); banks and the war machine, closely collaborating since the 1800s; shattering the left-right paradigm and finding the intersection of corporate power and public corruption; why the US economic system is not now, and has never been, based on unfettered free market capitalism; and how the state apparatus attracts those seeking power and privilege, putting the lie to the Marxist theory of capturing government to “help the little guy.”

MP3 here. (19:40)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Benjamin Tua

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_02_tua.mp3]

Benjamin Tua, retired Foreign Service Officer and contributor to Foreign Policy in Focus, discusses his article “Winners and Losers in a New Middle East;” why Egypt’s elections will likely result in something markedly more democratic than Mubarak’s regime; why Israel, faced with the Arab spring and a renewed Middle East, should accept a two-state solution based on 1967 borders before it’s too late; the other Jewish organizations challenging AIPAC’s dominance, while young Jews are increasingly sympathetic to Palestinians; and the enduring myths used to justify intervention in Libya.

MP3 here. (19:59)

Benjamin Tua is a retired Foreign Service Officer. He served in Israel from 1982-1985. He currently is an independent analyst and Foreign Policy In Focus contributor.

Jeffrey Kaye

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_01_kaye.mp3]

Jeffrey Kaye, writer for Truthout and Firedoglake, discusses his article “Deconstructing the Campaign to Malign Award-Winning Article on Guantanamo ‘Suicides’” about (the other) Scott Horton’s exposé; the many half-truths and misrepresentations in Alex Koppelman’s Adweek hit piece; how Koppelman’s publication in Adweek sends a message to magazine publishers and advertisers about what is beyond the pale in mainstream media; the Seton Hall study on the botched NCIS investigation of the “suicides;” and the inconclusive autopsy – due to conspicuously missing body parts – done by Swiss pathologist Patrice Mangin (spun by Koppelman as an endorsement of the suicide theory).

MP3 here. (19:38)

Jeffrey Kaye, a psychologist living in Northern California, writes regularly on torture and other subjects for Truthout, The Public Record and Firedoglake. He also maintains a personal blog, Invictus.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_01_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses Asia Times journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad’s apparent murder by Pakistan’s ISI for exposing al-Qaeda’s infiltration of Pakistan’s military; how the Afghan Taliban and al-Qaeda share a common opposition to US occupation, but not much else; the strained and complicated US/Pakistan relationship; the preliminary “talk about talk” dialogue with the Taliban that is highly unlikely to end in a peace deal; and how Washington is finally coming to grips with the economic limitations of permanent war – which may hasten withdrawal from Afghanistan.

MP3 here. (16:55)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_01_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses his article “Worse Than a Third Bush Term?” evaluating Obama’s presidential performance thus far; the “Nullify Now!” speeches on YouTube from the May 28th event in Los Angeles; how the Libya War raises Obama’s notoriety to Bush’s level; the US-supported Libyan rebels who learned their craft by fighting US troops in Iraq; and why most Americans still can’t put aside political party loyalties to demand an end to the wars.

MP3 here. (18:39)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Seymour Hersh

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_01_hersh.mp3]

Seymour Hersh, award winning investigative reporter for The New Yorker magazine., discusses his article “Iran and the Bomb: How real is the nuclear threat;” the lack of evidence for Iran’s interest in nuclear weapons after 2003, despite extensive satellite and covert surveillance (and even before then, the idea was to counter an Iraqi nuclear weapon, not threaten Israel or the US); how the 2011 NIE reinforces the 2007 assessment, and makes the harsh sanctions on Iran look even more indefensible; Obama’s acute isolation within the White House echo chamber; and some sane advice from retired ambassador Thomas Pickering: stop hectoring Iran about a non-existent nuclear weapons program and negotiate like grown-ups.

MP3 here. (28:55)

Seymour M. Hersh wrote his first piece for The New Yorker in 1971 and has been a regular contributor to the magazine since 1993. His journalism and publishing awards include a Pulitzer Prize, five George Polk Awards, two National Magazine Awards, and more than a dozen other prizes for investigative reporting. As a staff writer, Hersh won a National Magazine Award for Public Interest for his 2003 articles “Lunch with the Chairman,” “Selective Intelligence,” and “The Stovepipe.” In 2004, Hersh exposed the Abu Ghraib prison scandal in a series of pieces in the magazine; in 2005, he again received a National Magazine Award for Public Interest, an Overseas Press Club award, the National Press Foundation’s Kiplinger Distinguished Contributions to Journalism award, and his fifth George Polk Award, making him that award’s most honored laureate.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_05_31_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, editorial assistant at The American Conservative magazine, discusses his article “The American Deep State,” about Eli Lake’s New Republic article “Enemy of the State: Are we at war with Pakistan’s intelligence service;” how Lake’s premise equally applies to the unelected US military-industrial complex that exerts enormous political influence and pursues a policy agenda contrary to national interests; the low-grade war already going on in Pakistan; and the three and four-star officers who almost universally find post-retirement work as lobbyists or consultants with defense contractors.

MP3 here. (18:14)

John Glaser is an editorial assistant at The American Conservative.

Joshua Holland

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_05_31_holland.mp3]

Joshua Holland, editor and senior writer at AlterNet, discusses his article “Five Eye-Opening Facts About Our Bloated Post-9/11 ‘Defense’ Spending;” how the “Medicare gap” pales in comparison to the defense spending increase since 9/11; the significant but unknown costs of war, including long term care for severely wounded soldiers; the common ideological ground shared by leftists and Ron Paul libertarians; what your tax dollars buy, in terms of guns and butter; and how defense spending accounts for the vast majority of public debt – and should be the first target of budget cuts.

MP3 here. (19:48)

Joshua Holland is an editor and senior writer at AlterNet. He is the author of The 15 Biggest Lies About the Economy (and Everything else the Right Doesn’t Want You to Know About Taxes, Jobs and Corporate America).