Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_31_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, internationally syndicated columnist and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses how a Libyan-style regime change in Syria could give the neoconservatives a backdoor-to-war with Iran; talk of securing Netanyahu’s legacy through a Churchill-like “moment of greatness” where he attacks Iran and saves Israel from another holocaust; behind-the-scenes fighting by British and French special forces in Libya; why Turkey is harboring an anti-Syrian “army” of deserters; why Iraq will fall apart (even more) when the US completely withdraws; the former Pakistani cricket player leading protests against US influence; and why the Haqqani network is just the latest excuse for the failing war in Afghanistan.

MP3 here. (38:34)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_31_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio host and author of the upcoming new book Red and Blue and Broke All Over: Restoring America’s Free Economy, discusses why America’s economic and political problems can’t be solved until the red-blue paradigm is rejected; irreconcilable economic headlines where consumer spending is up while income drops – and nobody asks why; why the demand (Keynes) and supply-siders (Friedman) are two sides of the same government monetary intervention coin; a summary of the global debt crisis and European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF); the other PIIGS countries teetering on insolvency while Greek rescue plans founder; how “military Keynesianism” has bankrupted the US; the intertwined fates of US empire and the dollar; and why Americans prefer a stern father-figure for president, even one as clueless as Herman Cain.

MP3 here. (34:08)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.)

Tom Porteous

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_28_porteous.mp3]

Tom Porteous, deputy program director at Human Rights Watch, discusses the outgoing Gadhafi regime’s many human rights violations in Libya; why the Benghazi massacre threat (used to justify the no-fly zone and “civilian protection” NATO campaign) was for real; why Libya’s NTC needs to quickly get a functional government in place before the country descends into factional violence; and why investigations are needed for crimes committed by rebel groups, as well as NATO’s exceeded mandate.

MP3 here. (20:02)

Tom Porteous is the deputy program director at Human Rights Watch and is based in Washington DC. He joined Human Rights Watch in 2006 as the London director responsible for communications and advocacy in the United Kingdom. Porteous has a background in journalism, diplomacy, and UN peacekeeping. In the 1980s and early 1990s he was a freelance correspondent for the Guardian newspaper, the BBC, and other media, first in Cairo and later in Berlin, Algeria, and Morocco. He worked in UN peacekeeping operations in Somalia and Liberia. He also served as conflict management adviser for Africa in the UK’s Foreign Office from 2001 to 2003. Porteous studied classics at Oxford University.

Mark Sheffield

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_27_sheffield.mp3]

Mark Sheffield of the Policy on Point blog discusses his article “I Drink Your Milkshake! Checking the Chinese in Central Africa;” learning geography by tracking US military interventions the world over; deploying troops to central Africa to fight a has-been Christan millenarian cult – though curiously Uganda has lots of oil resources and no cultists; how US access to DRC (Congo) rare earth minerals could counter the current Chinese stranglehold on the market; the not-too-surprising increase in African deployments since AFRICOM‘s founding; and how Obama’s Libyan intervention seems to have emboldened him to begin new conflicts without even asking Congress.

MP3 here. (19:54)

Mark Sheffield runs the Policy on Point blog.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_26_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses the PATRIOT Act’s ten year anniversary and its legacy of unlimited government power; why there’s nothing more permanent that a temporary government program; the silence of Democrats who stopped protesting the PATRIOT Act’s provisions once Obama took office; why a large majority of Americans have no problem with their government assassinating “bad guys” deemed too inconvenient or difficult to prosecute; and why the MSM thinks Ron Paul is crazy for challenging unlimited police powers, even while the TSA turns Tennessee into East Germany.

MP3 here. (20:07)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_26_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses Obama’s “let this be a lesson to the rest of you dictators (except the ones we like)” comment about the beaten, sodomized, executed Gadhafi; the doctors and nurses in Bahrain who were arrested and tortured for helping injured protesters; the continuing Bahrain protests despite the crackdowns – although the media ignores them anyway; why the Libya War was essentially waged as a PR campaign to showcase the US as a benevolent actor instead of the Arab spring antagonist; and how continued friendly relations with Uzbekistan show the Obama administration is more concerned with Afghanistan War logistics than human rights.

MP3 here. (29:46)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_27_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses his article “‘Rising’ to Empire, Falling from Grace;” why the “United State” of America is indeed an empire and has the Founding Fathers turning in their graves; why America’s elite are little different than the Soviet Union’s nomenklatura; the strengths and shortcomings of the Occupy Wall Street and Tea Party movements, and how their minor differences keep them divided and conquered; how Oakland police – disinterested in property or violent crimes – found time to nearly kill IVAW member and Occupy Oakland protester Scott Olsen; and redefining political centrism as something resembling libertarianism, rather than the radicalism of John McCain and Joe Lieberman.

MP3 here. (20:11)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_25_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the 20 year US campaign of death and destruction in Iraq, seemingly coming to an end after the Iraqi government rejected a troop extension beyond 2011; how Ahmed Chalabi convinced the neoconservatives a post-Saddam Iraq would be emphatically pro-Israel; why it shouldn’t surprise anyone that the current Iraqi government – composed largely of former exiles living in Iran – would be closely allied with Iran; how Nouri al-Maliki tricked the Bush administration into negotiating a troop withdrawal deadline (that became the definitive SOFA); and why the gigantic US embassy is destined to become a museum of US atrocities.

MP3 here. (19:44)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_25_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the election results in Tunisia (birthplace of the Arab spring) that produced a victory for a conservative Islamist party; why any new Middle East/North Africa government with “Muslim” or “Islamic” in its name should worry about a US regime change scheme; Senator Lindsey Graham’s overt plan to bribe Libya’s rebel government with foreign aid and grab their oil; and how Somalia’s mass-starvation problem is related to the multiple invasions of US-proxy forces from neighboring African countries.

MP3 here. (19:42)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_25_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses his article “Drone Warfare Is Fraught with Danger;” setting a new “Libya precedent” of cheap and easy regime change with US drones in the air and indigenous fighters on the ground; forgetting the quick “victories” in Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2003 that later went sour; the case for impeaching Barack Obama for violating the War Powers Act; why a commander in chief less removed from the field of battle might not conduct warfare so casually; and why the US is severely tempting fate (and blowback) by conducting such an aggressive and violent foreign policy.

MP3 here. (20:12)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Luc Côté

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_24_cote.mp3]

Luc Côté, director of the film You Don’t Like the Truth: 4 days inside Guantanamo, discusses the interrogation videos of 16-year old prisoner Omar Khadr, taken by Canadian intelligence agents inside Guantanamo; how the same American interrogator who killed Dilawar the taxi driver at Bagram prison also interrogated the badly-injured Khadr about 50 times; and how sleep deprivation of prisoners (through the “frequent flyer program“) made extracting false confessions much easier for interrogators.

MP3 here. (20:06)

Luc Côté has been directing and producing films since the age of fourteen. For the past 35 years, he has traveled extensively around the world, making social documentaries that capture the human spirit. In the early eighties, he founded his first production company in New York, On Track Video. In 1986, he joined Robbie Hart in Montreal and launched Adobe Productions. Together, they produced and directed more than 30 films including two award winning documentary series: Turning 16 and Rainmakers.

Turning 16, a series about teenagers around the world produced in 1993, has been broadcasted in more than forty countries and got several national and international awards, including the prestigious Japan Prize, from The International Educational Program Contest sponsored by the NHK TV network and a Gémeaux Award from The Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television. Most recently, Luc Côté has been directing films for other production companies: Macumba International, Virage, Erezi Productions and the Cirque du Soleil.

In 2005, he directed, Crash Landing, a film about post-traumatic stress disorder that was selected to be shown in many festivals around the world and won several awards including an Honorable Mention for best Canadian Documentary at the Hot Docs Toronto Festival in 2005. Along with his work as a filmmaker, Luc teaches documentary film making at the International Film School of Cuba.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_24_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses how the Obama administration pushed hard for an extended Iraq troop presence, got rejected, then spun it as fulfillment of a campaign promise; why the Iraq War’s principal aim was to establish a massive military garrison from which to project power in the Middle East; the long-term training of Iraqi pilots on US fighter jets; and why the huge US embassy in Baghdad may not have enough force protection to secure it – conjuring images of rooftop helicopter rescues in Saigon.

MP3 here. (19:44)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Kevin Zeese

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_24_zeese.mp3]

Kevin Zeese, Executive Director of VotersForPeace and Co-Chair of Come Home America, discusses whistleblower Bradley Manning’s treatment at Fort Leavenworth prison; why the UN torture investigator is still being denied a private interview with Manning; how Manning’s chance for a fair military trial has been greatly impaired by Obama’s pronouncement of his guilt; the common ground shared by protesters – from the Left and Right – against government corruption; and why relying on the UN to enforce the rule of law isn’t ideal, but is almost required while all means of legal redress are denied.

MP3 here. (20:01)

Kevin Zeese is the Executive Director and co-founder of VotersForPeace. He also served as the Executive Director of Democracy Rising, is an attorney, and a long term peace advocate. He took a leave from VotersForPeace for most of 2006 while he was running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland. Zeese was a founding member of the Montgomery County Coalition Against the War in Maryland and has worked with various non-profit organizations on peace, justice, and democracy issues since 1978.

Glenn Greenwald

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_21_greenwald.mp3]

Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald discusses the release of his new book With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful; how Barack “Nobel Peace Prize” Obama gets away with assassinating US citizens, like Anwar al-Awlaki and his sixteen year old son; and why Americans discouraged by their economic prospects can at least be proud of their government’s killing prowess.

MP3 here. (7:40)

Glenn Greenwald was a constitutional lawyer in New York City, first at the Manhattan firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, and then at the litigation firm he founded, Greenwald, Christoph. Greenwald litigated numerous high-profile and significant constitutional cases in federal and state courts around the country, including multiple First Amendment challenges. He has a J.D. from New York University School of Law (1994) and a B.A. from George Washington University (1990). In October of 2005, Greenwald started a political and legal blog, Unclaimed Territory, which quickly became one of the most popular and highest-trafficked in the blogosphere.

Upon disclosure by the New York Times in December 2005 of President Bush’s warrantless eavesdropping program, Greenwald became one of the leading and most cited experts on that controversy. In early 2006, he broke a story on his blog regarding the NSA scandal that served as the basis for front-page articles in the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers, all of which credited his blog for the story. Several months later, Sen. Russ Feingold read from one of Greenwald’s posts during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Feingold’s resolution to censure the president for violating FISA. In 2008, Sen. Chris Dodd read from Greenwald’s Salon blog during floor debate over FISA. Greenwald’s blog was also cited as one of the sources for the comprehensive report issued by Rep. John Conyers titled “The Constitution in Crisis.” In 2006, he won the Koufax Award for best new blog.

Greenwald is the author of A Tragic Legacy: How a Good vs. Evil Mentality Destroyed the Bush Presidency, How Would a Patriot Act? Defending American Values from a President Run Amok and Great American Hypocrites: Toppling the Big Myths of Republican Politics.

Nick Baumann

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_21_baumann.mp3]

Nick Baumann, news editor at Mother Jones, discusses his article “Locked Up Abroad—for the FBI;” US citizen Gulet Mohamed’s secretive “proxy detention” in Kuwait where he was beaten and interrogated for weeks, apparently at the US government’s behest; other individuals subject to “rendition-lite;” and how to hold the government accountable when the state secrets privilege functions as a “get out of court free” card and the Department of Justice is asleep at the switch.

MP3 here. (10:20)

Nick Baumann is based in Mother Jones’s DC bureau, where he covers national politics and civil liberties issues. Nick has also written for The Economist, The Atlantic, The Washington Monthly, and Commonweal.

Patrick Cockburn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_20_cockburn.mp3]

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent, discusses Moammar Gadhafi’s death and NATO’s “mission accomplished” in Libya; why the rebel factions will have to find a new cause to rally around, or else face divisions and infighting; why the Arab spring is a genuine grassroots movement, not a CIA-engineered series of color coded revolutions; and having to rely on human rights NGOs for reports critical of Libya’s NTC, since the media doesn’t do its own investigations or publicize information contrary to US government aims (even Al Jazeera is a rebel cheerleader).

MP3 here. (26:49)

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent, has been visiting Iraq since 1978. He was awarded the 2005 Martha Gellhorn prize for war reporting in recognition of his writing on Iraq. He is the author of, his memoir, The Broken Boy (Jonathan Cape, 2005), and with Andrew Cockburn, Saddam Hussein: An American Obsession (Verso, The Occupation: War, Resistance and Daily Life in Iraq (Verso, 2006) and Muqtada: Muqtada al-Sadr, the Shia revival and the Struggle for Iraq.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_20_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses his article “Americans Pay Dearly to Maintain Israel’s Nuclear Secrets;” the Army Corps of Engineers’ $170 million cleanup project at NUMEC, a Pennsylvania nuclear facility that diverted uranium to Israel in the 1960s; why the CIA still won’t release documents on NUMEC (and the agency knows plenty about it), even to aid the cleanup effort; the juvenile stupidity of “strategic ambiguity,” where government officials and the US media feign ignorance or willfully ignore anything about Israel’s nuclear program; and how NUMEC fits the profile of a long list of Israeli front companies that smuggled US military assets and nuclear materials.

MP3 here. (18:30)

Grant F. Smith is the author of the book America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_19_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Research Editor at the Independent Institute, discusses the arguments bound to convince social conservatives that ending the War on Drugs – if not outright legalization – is the best course of action; why a free society would choose family/community solutions to social problems (like drug addiction) instead of creating a police state that makes everything worse; getting the federal government out of the drug business and letting states regulate, like they do with alcohol and tobacco; why drug potency tends to increase during times of prohibition; and why ending the War on Drugs would be among the greatest advances to individual liberty imaginable.

MP3 here. (19:57)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute,  moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_19_escobar.mp3]

Pepe Escobar, journalist and author of Obama Does Globalistan, discusses his article “Obama, the king of Africa” about the US military commitment in Uganda and surrounding countries, supposedly to fight the Lord’s Resistance Army; the terrible human rights record of Uganda’s government (even worse than the LRA); the strange African brew of neo-colonialism, tinpot dictators, pipeline routes and JSOC outposts; the great game of mineral and energy extraction playing out between countries like China and South Korea who actually produce things, and the US that wants to spoil it for everyone; the Heritage Oil company’s remarkable ability to capitalize on US military interventions in oil rich countries, and get oil contracts before anyone else; ample opportunities for humanitarian interventions in the DRC (Congo); and the version 1.3 US proxy war with Somalia, this time with Kenyan forces.

MP3 here. (40:33)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

An extreme traveler, Pepe’s nose for news has taken him to all parts of the globe. He was in Afghanistan and interviewed the military leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Masoud, a couple of weeks before his assassination. Two weeks before September 11, 2001, while Pepe was in the tribal areas of Pakistan, Asia Times Online published his prophetic piece, “Get Osama! Now! Or else …” Pepe was one of the first journalists to reach Kabul after the Taliban’s retreat, and more recently he has explored and reported from Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, US and China.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_19_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the double standard wherein the US can assist in assassinating Iranian nuclear scientists but the very idea of reciprocity (via a dubious plot) is beyond the pale; the skeptical accounts of the Iranian assassination “plot” in the European press, especially compared to the credulous US media; the hardliners in Congress pushing for mandatory military custody of terrorism suspects, formerly the purview of federal courts, in a cynical political move to make Obama look bad; how this tough-guy approach will impair extradition of terrorist suspects to the US (as few countries will hand over citizens to a military kangaroo court); trying Rudy Guliani and his cohorts on material support for terrorism charges – in Guantanamo; Obama’s non-reply on a justification for the assassination of Anwar al-Awlaki sixteen year old son; and why unchecked executive power may have overwhelmed the Posse Comitatus Act’s prohibitions against domestic military operations.

MP3 here. (19:57)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Andrew Cockburn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_18_cockburn.mp3]

Andrew Cockburn, author of Rumsfeld: His Rise, Fall and Catastrophic Legacy, discusses his article “Search and destroy: The Pentagon’s losing battle against IEDs;” the $70 billion “Manhattan Project” to combat $20 homemade landmines – that remain as effective as ever; how the military rejects cheap low-tech solutions and keeps the cash flowing to defense contractors; and the battle of wits between a Taliban bomb-maker and an American explosive ordnance technician.

MP3 here. (19:31)

Andrew Cockburn is the author of Rumsfeld: His Rise, Fall and Catastrophic Legacy, and co-producer of American Casino, a documentary on the origins and consequences of the financial crash. He is a writer and lecturer on defense and national affairs and has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, Playboy, Vanity Fair, and National Geographic, among other publications.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_18_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses a couple alternative explanations of the Iranian assassination plot, both more sensible than the official government story; why Iran would essentially commit national suicide by conducting a terrorist attack in Washington DC; the system of incentives for law enforcement agents and informants to play up any terrorism angle; prosecuting the CIA officials who lied to National Security Advisor Richard Clarke, in order to get the big fish in the Bush administration; and how the mainstream media is failing (on purpose) to expose government lies and give Americans credible information.

MP3 here. (19:48)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

 

Flynt Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_18_leverett.mp3]

Flynt Leverett, former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, discusses the Iran uranium swap negotiations in 2009-10; a reminder that the Tehran Research Reactor was supplied by the US in the 1960s, and reconfigured after the 1979 revolution to use far-less enriched uranium (reducing weapons proliferation risks); how the initial swap offer by the US asked Iran to hand over its low-enriched uranium, with no collateral, and trust France to provide fuel rods a year later; the eminently reasonable Iranian counter-proposals that were ridiculed and dismissed by US officials; and how Obama reneged on his promise to Turkish and Brazilian negotiators when Iran accepted a deal he was sure would be rejected.

MP3 here. (30:00)

Flynt Leverett runs The Race For Iran blog and teaches at Pennsylvania State University’s School of International Affairs. Additionally, he directs the Iran Project at the New America Foundation, where he is a Senior Research Fellow.

Dr. Leverett is a leading authority on the Middle East and Persian Gulf, U.S. foreign policy, and global energy affairs. From 1992 to 2003, he had a distinguished career in the U.S. government, serving as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a CIA Senior Analyst. He left the George W. Bush Administration and government service in 2003 because of disagreements about Middle East policy and the conduct of the war on terror.

Dr. Leverett’s 2006 monograph, Dealing With Tehran: Assessing U.S. Diplomatic Options Toward Iran, presented the seminal argument for a U.S.-Iranian “grand bargain”, an idea that he has developed in multiple articles and Op Eds in The New York Times, The National Interest, POLITICO, Salon, Washington Monthly, and the New America Foundation’s “Big Ideas for a New America” series.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_18_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses his post “Impasse: US Says No Breakthrough in Iraq Talks;” the disagreement on prosecutorial immunity for US soldiers remaining in Iraq; envisioning a State Department-led occupation run out of the world’s largest (and expanding) embassy; the big increase in US troop casualties in Afghanistan during the Obama administration’s tenure; the legendary corruption in all levels of the Afghan government; and why a US military excursion in Uganda took everyone by surprise, even though US involvement goes back a few years.

MP3 here. (18:51)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_17_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the latest US war, this time battling the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda and neighboring countries; the loss of any objective criteria from the term “national interest;” propping up friendly African dictators who agree to take on the burden of US demands, like fighting Al-Shabab in Somalia; the previous disastrous attempts to fight the LRA; how AFRICOM’s rapid expansion will get the US bogged down in more interminable, unwinnable wars; and why the “antiwar President” Obama still has stalwart defenders, even though at least half a dozen new conflicts started on his watch.

MP3 here. (23:47)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_17_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “US Officials Peddle False Intel to Support Terror Plot Claims;” piling on the propaganda to pass more punitive sanctions and further isolate Iran (but not start a war apparently); why the government would surely have recorded damning conversations between Manssor Arbabsiar and the DEA informant – if the plot was even remotely real; why the FBI’s real target was Iranian Quds force deputy commander Abdul Reza Shahlai, not the stooge Arbabsiar; and why the $100,000 balance transfer, supposedly for the Saudi Ambassador’s assassination, was for likely intended for something else.

MP3 here. (19:12)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_14_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, member of Veterans For Peace and former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses his article “Petraeus’s CIA Fuels Iran Murder Plot;” fixing the facts around the policy yet again, this time to start a war with Iran; why you can bet Petraeus’s first objective as CIA director was to make analysts stop honest assessments of the failing Afghanistan War, and start saying “the surge worked;” how Obama’s advisors are limiting his options and trapping him into a war with Iran; and why you should get out and protest government wrongdoing (there’s plenty to choose from).

MP3 here. (33:39)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Max Blumenthal

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_14_blumenthal.mp3]

Max Blumenthal, author of Republican Gomorrah: Inside the Movement that Shattered the Party, discusses the “price tag” attacks by Israeli settlers against Palestinians, meant to extract a “price” when the Israeli government dares to defy the settlers’ wishes; why the state of Israel has no more respect for Israeli Arab property rights or religious expression than the settlers do; how Israel’s government allied with the Bedouin and Druze (and later betrayed them) to divide and conquer any resistance to land grabs; the reality of “land swap” deals – essentially the expulsion of 250,000 Palestinian citizens from Israel by redrawing the map around their homes; how the Shin Bet largely ignores Jewish terrorism but keeps a very watchful eye on peaceful Palestinian protesters; and why it’s about time to consider a normal democratic Israel instead of a Zionist colonial state in perpetual warfare, necessitating a propagandized population and mandatory military service.

MP3 here. (25:52)

Max Blumenthal is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author whose articles and video documentaries have appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Daily Beast, The Nation, The Huffington Post, Salon.com, Al Jazeera English and many other publications. He is a writing fellow for the Nation Institute. His book, Republican Gomorrah: Inside The Movement That Shattered The Party, is a New York Times and Los Angeles Times bestseller.

Flynt Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_14_leverett.mp3]

Flynt Leverett, former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, discusses his article “Iranian ‘plots’ and American hubris;” why the strange assassination plot is at cross-purposes with Iran’s policy objectives (but syncs perfectly with Israel’s); Iran’s reliance on foreign proxy groups and asymmetric warfare for national defense, in lieu of a powerful conventional military; US policy towards Iran that says, in essence, a meaningful defensive deterrence is really a provocative threat; how Obama’s bad-faith negotiations killed a viable uranium swap deal with Iran, Brazil and Turkey; blaming Iran for attacks on US troops in Iraq; and how the US starts wars by practicing false diplomacy, rebuffing peaceful resolutions then sending in the military while claiming the other side was intransigent.

MP3 here. (27:52)

Flynt Leverett runs The Race For Iran blog and teaches at Pennsylvania State University’s School of International Affairs. Additionally, he directs the Iran Project at the New America Foundation, where he is a Senior Research Fellow.

Dr. Leverett is a leading authority on the Middle East and Persian Gulf, U.S. foreign policy, and global energy affairs. From 1992 to 2003, he had a distinguished career in the U.S. government, serving as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a CIA Senior Analyst. He left the George W. Bush Administration and government service in 2003 because of disagreements about Middle East policy and the conduct of the war on terror.

Dr. Leverett’s 2006 monograph, Dealing With Tehran: Assessing U.S. Diplomatic Options Toward Iran, presented the seminal argument for a U.S.-Iranian “grand bargain”, an idea that he has developed in multiple articles and Op Eds in The New York Times, The National Interest, POLITICO, Salon, Washington Monthly, and the New America Foundation’s “Big Ideas for a New America” series.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_14_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the film You Don’t Like the Truth: 4 Days Inside Guantánamo about child soldier and Canadian citizen Omar Khadr’s interrogation in Guantanamo; Khadr’s travails in Afghanistan, where he was nearly killed by a US airstrike then captured and accused of killing a medic; the US government’s decision to treat child soldiers as regular prisoners in contravention of international norms; and how military commissions have made it a war crime to fight against US invasions and occupations.

MP3 here. (20:19)

Andy Worthington writes regularly for newspapers and websites including the Guardian, Truthout, Cageprisoners, and the Future of Freedom Foundation. He writes occasionally for the Daily Star, Lebanon, the Huffington Post, Antiwar.com, CounterPunch, AlterNet, and ZNet. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

David Enders

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_13_enders.mp3]

David Enders, freelance journalist and author of Baghdad Bulletin, discusses his article “A reporter in Libya wonders about lessons of war;” the racism against black Africans in Libya, which has led to large scale killing and rape by the rebels (turning Susan Rice’s warning on its head); waiting to see if Gaddafi loyalists are massacred once the rebels (courtesy NATO) finally take Sirte; and how Enders could have loaded his car with anti-tank missiles, thanks to huge caches of unsecured weapons.

MP3 here. (19:32)

David Enders, author of Baghdad Bulletin, is a New York-based freelance television and print journalist.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_13_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, internationally syndicated columnist and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses his healthy skepticism of all FBI sting operations, especially this latest Iranian assassination plot; the curious targeting of Saudi Arabia’s ambassador – hardly a powerhouse political figure; cooperation between the US, Israel and Saudi Arabia on getting rid of the Assad government in Syria; the long term neoconservative plan to break up Arab countries into stateless warring tribes, leaving Israel as the unchallenged regional hegemon; how India’s increasing involvement in Afghanistan provokes Pakistan and serves as a foil to Chinese influence; rumors that Israel is working with India in restive Islamic tribal areas; cowardly Congressional Reps who still won’t speak out against the Afghan War even after a decade of futility; and the planeloads of western businessmen flying to Libya, exemplifying what colonialism looks like in the 21st century.

MP3 here. (38:20)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Daphne Eviatar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_12_eviatar.mp3]

Daphne Eviatar, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First, discusses the UN report on widespread torture in Afghan-run detention facilities; the difficulty of assessing US torture-prevention programs that are kept secret; discarding established conventions for prisoners of war, as the US makes up new rules and prisoner classifications on the fly; and how, ten years after 9/11, indefinite detention in military custody has become the new normal.

MP3 here. (20:04)

Daphne Eviatar is a lawyer and freelance journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, The Nation, Legal Affairs, Mother Jones, the Washington Independent, HuffingtonPost and many others. She is a Senior Reporter at The American Lawyer, Senior Associate in Law and Security for Human Rights First and was an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow in 2005 and a Pew International Journalism fellow in 2002.

Kurt Haskell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_12_haskell.mp3]

Kurt Haskell, Detroit area attorney and fellow passenger with “underbomber” Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab on Northwest Airlines flight 253, discusses Abdulmutallab’s surprising guilty plea that means Haskell can’t be a defense witness; why the well-dressed man who helped Abdulmutallab board the plane in the Netherlands is probably an undercover intelligence agent for the US; waiting for sentencing in January after the story disappears from the news cycle; and the cumulative circumstantial evidence that shows the US government purposely gave Abdulmutallab a defective bomb to stage a terrorist attack.

MP3 here. (29:41)

Kurt Haskell is an attorney in the Detroit suburb of Taylor. He was a passenger on Northwest Airlines Flight 253 and has given numerous accounts of his experience to the media.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_12_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the inside information on the alleged Iranian plot to assassinate Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US; indications that the plot was legitimate but an amateurish rogue operation – not the work of Iran’s government; escalating talk of “all options on the table” for military retaliation against Iran; and why it’s never a good sign when Saudi Arabia and Israel agree on a common regional enemy.

MP3 here. (18:30)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_11_wheeler.mp3]

Blogger Marcy Wheeler discusses her blog post about the “other guy” killed with Anwar al-Awlaki, “How Can Samir Khan Be ‘Collateral Damage’ If OLC Memo Restricted Civilian Death;” how assassinations justified by secret intelligence are replacing criminal trials based on disclosed evidence; why Obama’s reluctance to take credit for Awlaki’s assassination – after bragging about killing Osama bin Laden – could mean he’s worried about being prosecuted; and the secret legal interpretation of the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force.

MP3 here. (20:04)

Blogger Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, grew up bi-coastally, starting with every town in New York with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, California, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal. Since then, she has lived in Western Massachusetts, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Ann Arbor, and — just recently — Western Michigan.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to Michigan; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton” — a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging. (Oh, and I hear Amazon still has the book for sale.)

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy met her husband Mr. emptywheel playing Ultimate Frisbee, though she retired from the sport several years ago. Marcy, Mr. EW and their dog — McCaffrey the MilleniaLab — live in a loft in a lovely urban hellhole.

Jennifer Lynch

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_12_lynch.mp3]

Jennifer Lynch, staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, discusses her article “Newly Released Documents Reveal Defense Department Intelligence Violations;” how the Army is illegally using National Security Letters to engage in domestic surveillance, including of Planned Parenthood for some reason; how “exigent letters” are even more prone to abuse than NSL’s; the generally positive television portrayal of cops with unlimited authority; and how oversight and accountability are considered passé since “everything changed” after 9/11.

MP3 here. (19:53)

Jennifer Lynch is a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation and works on open government, transparency and privacy issues as part of EFF’s FOIA Litigation for Accountable Government (FLAG) Project. Prior to joining EFF, Jennifer was the Clinical Teaching Fellow with the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic at UC Berkeley School of Law. At the Samuelson Clinic, Jennifer specialized in privacy and intellectual property issues, including investigations on social media, privacy and the smart electrical grid, digital books, and open source regimes for biotech. Before the Clinic, Jennifer practiced with Bingham McCutchen in San Francisco and clerked for Judge A. Howard Matz in the Central District of California. She earned both her undergraduate and law degrees from UC Berkeley. She has published academically on identity theft and phishing attacks (20 Berkeley Tech. L.J. 259) and sovereign immunity in civil rights cases (62 Fla. L. Rev. 203).

Greg Gordon

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_11_gordon.mp3]

Greg Gordon, investigative reporter for McClatchy Newspapers, discusses his article “FBI’s case against anthrax suspect rife with questions;” the government’s accidental court filing (since retracted) that claimed Bruce Ivins couldn’t have made the anthrax that killed five people in 2001; why the anthrax wasn’t really “weaponized;” and why the FBI’s circumstantial case against Ivins – from his supposedly misleading anthrax sample submission, to his fear of losing his funding and job – could be totally wrong.

MP3 here. (18:19)

Greg Gordon, an investigative reporter, has spent 33 years uncovering waste, fraud, abuse and misconduct in Washington.

Since joining McClatchy’s national staff in 2006, he has helped expose Wall Street’s role in the 2008 financial crisis, partisanship in the Justice Department and gaps in U.S. homeland security. In 2010, he and colleagues Kevin Hall and Chris Adams were honored as finalists for the Pulitzer Prize for their financial reporting, which included Gordon’s four-part series detailing Goldman Sachs’ selloff of tens of billions of dollars in securities backed by risky home mortgages while it secretly bet that a housing downturn would send the value of those securities plummeting.

In 2008, he, along with Margaret Talev and Marisa Taylor, won a McClatchy “President’s Award’’ and Scripps Howard’s Raymond Clapper Memorial Award for Washington reporting (Gordon’s second Clapper award) for exposing the Bush administration’s politicization of the Justice Department.

Earlier, Gordon spent 13 years with the Minneapolis Star Tribune and McClatchy, covering the prosecution of al-Qaida terrorist Zacarias Moussaoui and writing about asbestos in the workplace, money and politics, aviation, law enforcement and the environment. He also worked for The Detroit News’ Washington bureau and spent 18 years with United Press International, where he headed its Washington investigative team and won the 1983 Raymond Clapper award for coverage of an EPA scandal.

In 1990, he and co-author Ronald E. Cohen won Sigma Delta Chi’s gold medal for their book “Down to the Wire,” chronicling UPI’s financial collapse.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_11_morrow.mp3]

Adam Morrow, journalist with IPS News, discusses the latest violence between Coptic Christians and Muslims in Egypt; the possibility of agents provocateurs instigating violence, since Egypt has enjoyed a thousand years of relatively peaceful religious coexistence; the foundering revolution, as elections are repeatedly delayed and Mubarak cronies still run the country; and how the CIA’s penchant for regime change has cast doubt on the authenticity of popular resistance movements, even when they appear to be grassroots efforts.

MP3 here. (19:56)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

David Enders

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_11_enders.mp3]

David Enders, freelance journalist and author of Baghdad Bulletin, discusses why US combat troops will finally withdraw from Iraq this year (even if “advisors” and CIA/counterintelligence assets are staying long-term); Iraq’s broken infrastructure and authoritarian government – the legacy of eight years of occupation; why Iran and Iraq are natural allies with much in common; and how Iraq’s foreign policy is influenced by the large number of refugees still living in Syria.

MP3 here. (17:08)

David Enders, author of Baghdad Bulletin (Michigan), is a New York-based freelance television and print journalist.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_04_wheeler.mp3]

Blogger Marcy Wheeler discusses how Obama’s approved assassination of Anwar al-Awlaki makes him no better than Dick Cheney (even according to Cheney); the selective prosecution of classified information leakers (pro-government is a-ok); the Obama administration’s refusal to release internal legal memo’s that justify assassinations of US citizens, much less any actual evidence against Awlaki; why a federal terrorism trial nearly always results in conviction; and why Obama himself may be filling the role of Bush-era Office of Legal Council hacks like John Yoo.

MP3 here. (20:00)

Blogger Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, grew up bi-coastally, starting with every town in New York with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, California, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal. Since then, she has lived in Western Massachusetts, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Ann Arbor, and — just recently — Western Michigan.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to Michigan; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton” — a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging. (Oh, and I hear Amazon still has the book for sale.)

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy met her husband Mr. emptywheel playing Ultimate Frisbee, though she retired from the sport several years ago. Marcy, Mr. EW and their dog — McCaffrey the MilleniaLab — live in a loft in a lovely urban hellhole.

Ken Silverstein

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_05_silverstein.mp3]

Ken Silverstein, Washington Editor for Harper’s Magazine, discusses his article “Neoconservatives hype a new Cold War;” the public relations firms used as lobbies for foreign governments, like Randy Scheunemann’s Orion Strategies; the close-knit world of Washington D.C. where everyone knows everyone else and investigative journalists self-sensor for fear of alienating friends and colleagues; and the incestuous relationship between Georgia’s government, Scheunemann’s PR firm and reporters who collaborate to produce an anti-Russian propaganda echo chamber, not journalism.

I was wrong about Scheunemann talking with Saakashvili in the days before the Georgia war of 2008. I regret the error. -Scott

MP3 here. (18:29)

Ken Silverstein is the Washington Editor for Harper’s Magazine and writes Washington Babylon for Harper’s online.

A former reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Silverstein has covered such topics as intelligence collaboration between the CIA and controversial foreign governments in Sudan and Libya, political corruption in Washington, and links between American oil companies and repressive foreign governments. His 2004 series “The Politics of Petroleum,” co-written with T. Christian Miller, won an Overseas Press Club Award. His stories on ties between the government of Equatorial Guinea and major U.S. companies—including Riggs Bank, ExxonMobil and Marathon Oil—led to the convening of a federal grand jury, and to investigations by the Senate and the Securities and Exchange Commission. His report, co-written with Chuck Neubauer, on a lobbying business opened by Karen Weldon, daughter of Rep. Curt Weldon of Pennsylvania, led to the opening of an investigation by the House Ethics Committee.

Silverstein has been an outspoken gadfly in the newspaper business. In December of 2005, a memo he wrote to his editors at the Los Angeles Times expressing his dismay over their insistence on false “balance” was discussed in an article by Michael Massing in The New York Review of Books. While reporting on potential voter fraud in St. Louis in 2004, Silverstein was angered to learn that his findings were to be woven into a larger “balanced” piece on accusations being made nationwide, when it was clear that Republican charges of irregularities in St. Louis were insubstantial. “I am completely exasperated by this approach to the news,” Silverstein wrote. “The idea seems to be that we go out to report but when it comes time to write we turn off our brains and repeat the spin from both sides.”

Silverstein had been a contributing editor to Harper’s before joining the Times. One of his pieces for the magazine, The Radioactive Boy Scout, became a highly acclaimed book of the same title published by Random House in 2004. He has also written for Mother Jones, Washington Monthly, The Nation, Slate, and Salon. From 1989 to 1993 he was a correspondent for the Associated Press in Brazil.

John Feffer

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_05_feffer.mp3]

John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, discusses his article “The End of America’s Pacific Century;” North Korea’s attempt to increase its stature among nations, both militarily and economically – which requires regional allies with deep pockets; N. Korea’s deals with S. Korean industry and Russian energy concerns; the Bush administration’s overtures to N. Korea in 2006-07, followed up by Obama’s silent treatment; and the debate about whether the US needs to maintain a permanent military presence in East Asia to preserve the status quo and prevent old enemies from clashing again.

MP3 here. (20:08)

John Feffer is co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies. His webpage is JohnFeffer.com.

He is the author of several books and numerous articles. He has been a Writing Fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC and a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University. He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia. He has taught a graduate level course on international conflict at Sungkonghoe University in Seoul in July 2001 and delivered lectures at a variety of academic institutions including New York University, Hofstra, Union College, Cornell University, and Sofia University (Tokyo).

John has been widely interviewed in print and on radio. He serves on the advisory committees of the Alliance of Scholars Concerned about Korea. He is a recipient of the Herbert W. Scoville fellowship and has been a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation. He currently lives with his partner Karin Lee in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_04_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses his post “Experts Urge US Not to Reject Iran Nuclear Deal” and why the Obama administration is guaranteed to reject it anyway; how the loss of several thousand shoulder-fired missiles from the Libyan War have made civilian airplanes much more vulnerable to terrorist attacks; why infighting and confusion among Libya’s rebel groups guarantees an eventual NATO boots-on-the-ground occupation; and how the pushback of Afghanistan withdrawal dates makes a mockery of Obama’s promised 2011 deadline.

MP3 here. (17:59)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

 

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_04_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, member of Veterans For Peace and former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses his article “Israel’s Window to Bomb Iran;” how the 2007 National Intelligence Estimate thwarted the Bush administration’s push for war; Israel’s increasing isolation as its allies depart en masse; Obama’s acute vulnerability to the “Likud lobby’s” influence during his reelection bid; the former Mossad chiefs who worry about Netanyahu’s warmongering; and whether military leadership will speak up to Israel to avoid war with Iran – like admirals Mullen and Fallon did in 2007.

MP3 here. (19:52)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Peter Van Buren

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_04_vanburen.mp3]

Peter Van Buren, former State Department Foreign Service Officer in Iraq, discusses the minimal effect 63 billion dollars had on rebuilding Iraq since the 2003 invasion; his experience leading a Provincial Reconstruction Team with lots of cash but very little know-how; putting together laughably unhelpful conferences for hot-button issues like women’s rights; giving large cash handouts to Iraqis while public services in the US went unfunded; the Iraqi government’s minimal control outside major cities, where tribal mafia-like clans reigned; and why Prime Minister Maliki will allow the US occupation to continue, so long as he keeps getting free swag.

MP3 here. (19:59)

Peter Van Buren spent a year in Iraq as a State Department Foreign Service Officer serving as Team Leader for two Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs). Now in Washington, he writes about Iraq and the Middle East at his blog, We Meant Well. He is the author of We Meant Well: How I Helped Lose the Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Iraqi People.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_03_escobar.mp3]

Pepe Escobar, journalist and author of Obama Does Globalistan, discusses the Syrian rebellion’s near-triumph in Damascus and Aleppo; the large presence of Gulf Cooperation Council members eager to help a like-minded regime come to power should Assad be deposed; what murdered journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad had to say about al Qaeda’s strategy in Afghanistan and Pakistan; how the corrupt and incompetent Karzai regime fails to lure ordinary Afghans away from the Taliban’s influence; and the opportunity for China, Pakistan and Russia to broker an Afghanistan peace deal while the US and NATO remain preoccupied in their pursuit of total victory.

MP3 here. (19:57)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

An extreme traveler, Pepe’s nose for news has taken him to all parts of the globe. He was in Afghanistan and interviewed the military leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Masoud, a couple of weeks before his assassination. Two weeks before September 11, 2001, while Pepe was in the tribal areas of Pakistan, Asia Times Online published his prophetic piece, “Get Osama! Now! Or else …” Pepe was one of the first journalists to reach Kabul after the Taliban’s retreat, and more recently he has explored and reported from Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, US and China.

Ivan Eland

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_30_eland.mp3]

Ivan Eland, Senior Fellow at The Independent Institute and regular contributor to Antiwar.com, discusses his prescient article “A Double Standard for the Ultimate Penalty” about the protests against convicted cop-killer Troy Davis’s execution and the stony silence about US citizen Anwar al-Awlaki’s inclusion on the government’s assassination list (without conviction or even charge); saying goodbye to Fifth Amendment protection against punishment without due process; why the government faces more accountability when wiretapping Americans than when killing them; and the insanity of trusting Barack Obama’s administration (or any other) with correctly identifying and punishing perpetrators of crimes, in the total absence of judicial review.

MP3 here. (25:16)

Ivan Eland is Senior Fellow at the The Independent Institute and a regular Antiwar.com columnist. He is the author of Recarving Rushmore: Ranking the Presidents on Peace, Prosperity, and Liberty, The Empire Has No Clothes: U.S. Foreign Policy Exposed, Partitioning for Peace: An Exit Strategy for Iraq and Putting “Defense” Back into U.S. Defense Policy: Rethinking U.S. Security in the Post-Cold War World.

Steve Horn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_03_horn.mp3]

Truth-out writer Steve Horn discusses his article “Top Oil and Gas Executives Had Major Presence at Bahrain Conference;” how the Saudi Arabian-led Gulf Cooperation Council put down protests in Bahrain and kept the minority monarchy in power; the leftists who forget about Mideast autocracies and US military occupations whenever “green energy” is mentioned; the oil companies planning a major increase in Bahrain’s oil and gas production; and how the Carter Doctrine – the policy of pursuing US military dominance in the Persian Gulf – has been embraced by Republican and Democratic administrations alike since 1980.

MP3 here. (20:05)

Steve Horn writes for truth-out.org

Glenn Greenwald

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_30_kpfk_greenwald.mp3]

This interview was broadcast on KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles on September 30th.

Glenn Greenwald, Salon.com blogger and author of With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful, discusses his article “The due-process-free assassination of U.S. citizens is now reality;” how Anwar al-Awlaki was tried and convicted in the media through a government whisper campaign, rather than in a court of law; setting dangerous legal precedents that make the US more like a dictatorship than a republic; why the First Amendment protects the free speech of American citizens anywhere, even beyond the water’s edge; the unanimous SCOTUS decisions protecting unpopular speech, even when advocating violence; how “terrorism” has become a meaningless term, bending to the whims of government interpretation; and how severe societal pressures can break the bonds of American left-right tribalism to effect a political realignment that displaces Demopublican totalitarianism.

MP3 here. (29:49)

Glenn Greenwald was a constitutional lawyer in New York City, first at the Manhattan firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, and then at the litigation firm he founded, Greenwald, Christoph. Greenwald litigated numerous high-profile and significant constitutional cases in federal and state courts around the country, including multiple First Amendment challenges. He has a J.D. from New York University School of Law (1994) and a B.A. from George Washington University (1990). In October of 2005, Greenwald started a political and legal blog, Unclaimed Territory, which quickly became one of the most popular and highest-trafficked in the blogosphere.

Upon disclosure by the New York Times in December 2005 of President Bush’s warrantless eavesdropping program, Greenwald became one of the leading and most cited experts on that controversy. In early 2006, he broke a story on his blog regarding the NSA scandal that served as the basis for front-page articles in the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers, all of which credited his blog for the story. Several months later, Sen. Russ Feingold read from one of Greenwald’s posts during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Feingold’s resolution to censure the president for violating FISA. In 2008, Sen. Chris Dodd read from Greenwald’s Salon blog during floor debate over FISA. Greenwald’s blog was also cited as one of the sources for the comprehensive report issued by Rep. John Conyers titled “The Constitution in Crisis.” In 2006, he won the Koufax Award for best new blog.

Greenwald is the author of A Tragic Legacy: How a Good vs. Evil Mentality Destroyed the Bush Presidency, How Would a Patriot Act? Defending American Values from a President Run Amok and Great American Hypocrites: Toppling the Big Myths of Republican Politics.

Anand Gopal

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_30_gopal.mp3]

Independent journalist Anand Gopal discusses the relationship between the Haqqani network and Pakistan’s military/government; why the lack of any Northern Alliance-type allies will make a US ground invasion of Pakistan much more difficult than in Afghanistan; possible CIA involvement in the Afghan heroin trade and with Hamid Karzai’s murdered brother; why the Taliban’s break with al-Qaeda is genuine, and the “safe haven” rationale for continuing the occupation is bogus; slow reforms in Egypt, as elections – if they ever happen – face popular boycotts; how the US works behind the scenes to promote faux democracy in Egypt, with a controlled election that enables a pro-Israel government to take hold; and why there is still no diplomatic settlement in the works for Afghanistan, despite the wide acknowledgement that no military solution exists.

MP3 here. (21:14)

Anand Gopal has reported in Afghanistan for the Christian Science Monitor and the Wall Street Journal.  His dispatches can be read at AnandGopal.com. He is currently working on a book about the Afghan war.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_30_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “How McChrystal and Petraeus Built an Indiscriminate ‘Killing Machine’;” how Bob Woodward propagated the “surge” myth that special forces raids won the war in Iraq; targeting “insurgents” with drone surveillance and computerized cell phone tracking, while removing humans from intelligence analysis; why rounding up innocent people for interrogation, based on who or what they know, is a war crime; entering the realm of science fiction with Skynet-type systems that make automated life and death decisions; and how the US tracks and kills cellphones (and the people near them) based on the other phones they associate with.

MP3 here. (22:03)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.