Scott Horton Interviews John Feffer

Scott Horton, October 06, 2011

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John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, discusses his article “The End of America‚Äôs Pacific Century;” North Korea’s attempt to increase its stature among nations, both militarily and economically – which requires regional allies with deep pockets; N. Korea’s deals with S. Korean industry and Russian energy concerns; the Bush administration’s overtures to N. Korea in 2006-07, followed up by Obama’s silent treatment; and the debate about whether the US needs to maintain a permanent military presence in East Asia to preserve the status quo and prevent old enemies from clashing again.

MP3 here. (20:08)

John Feffer is co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies. His webpage is JohnFeffer.com.

He is the author of several books and numerous articles. He has been a Writing Fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC and a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University. He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia. He has taught a graduate level course on international conflict at Sungkonghoe University in Seoul in July 2001 and delivered lectures at a variety of academic institutions including New York University, Hofstra, Union College, Cornell University, and Sofia University (Tokyo).

John has been widely interviewed in print and on radio. He serves on the advisory committees of the Alliance of Scholars Concerned about Korea. He is a recipient of the Herbert W. Scoville fellowship and has been a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation. He currently lives with his partner Karin Lee in Hyattsville, Maryland.

5 Responses to “John Feffer”

  1. Asia Times online has mentioned North Korean ports becoming outlets for manufacturers in China's Northeast (aka Manchuria). Right now, the only port for the region is Dalian, which cannot handle more traffic than it does now. NE manufacturers have tried and failed to get permission to use the neighboring Russian ports. Use of North Korean ports would be an attractive alternative.

  2. More shocking news on O admin: they don't know what they are doing wrt DPRK. /s

  3. Thanks for this. Very interesting update on DPRK, which rarely hits the news,.

  4. Test. Reporting live from #OccupyMN with a comehomeamerica.us sign. How’s DC?

  5. FOREING INVETMENT FROM WHERE? BANKRUPT USA AND ENGLAND WHICH IS PRITNING MONEY IN ANOTHER NAME TO CHEAT ON THE DEBT THAT THSE ANGLOS PARAISTE OWE TO CHTE CHINSE AND IDNIANS AND RUSSIANS WHO HOLD THE DOALLR FRESERVE?COME ONE YOU SO CALLED FOREINERS ARE BANKRUTP AND HAVE BEEN LIEK THAT FOR A LONG TIME YOU HAVE NOTHIGN TO OFFER OTHERS EXCEPT LOOT.

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