Christopher Anders

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_28_anders.mp3]

Christopher Anders, senior legislative counsel in the ACLU’s Washington Legislative Office, discusses his article “Senators Demand the Military Lock Up American Citizens in a ‘Battlefield’ They Define as Being Right Outside Your Window;” the secretly-negotiated bill proposing indefinite detention in military custody for US citizens accused of terrorism (or donating to the wrong charities, etc.); how the Non-Detention Act of 1971 (the “never again” response to Japanese-American internment during WWII) envisioned Congress as a moderating force that would prevent Executive abuses; why the Supreme Court is the last obstacle preventing military POW camps from replacing the civilian justice system; indications that Obama may actually veto (rather than encourage) the Constitution’s destruction; and why you should call your senator to help stop this bill from passing.

MP3 here. (20:00)

Christopher E. Anders is the senior legislative counsel in the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington Legislative Office. He represents the ACLU in lobbying Congress and the executive branch on lesbian and gay rights, the faith-based initiative, conflicts between religious claims and civil rights, fair housing, oversight of federal civil rights enforcement, restoration of civil rights protections eroded by the courts, hate crimes and HIV/AIDS issues.

Steve Horn and Allen Ruff

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_28_horn_ruff.mp3]

Steve Horn and Allen Ruff discuss their two-part article at Truth-Out, “How Private Warmongers and the US Military Infiltrated American Universities;” how the allies of empire (from neoconservatives to liberal hawks) united to promote “Grand Strategy Programs” – essentially elaborate fictions used to trick Americans into supporting endless warfare; the group of military officers and academics behind David Petraeus and his PR-focused military doctrine; and how radicals have succeeded in redefining the political center and the acceptable range of foreign policy opinions.

MP3 here. (20:07)

Steve Horn is a researcher and writer at DeSmogBlog. He is also a freelance investigative journalist.

Allen Ruff is a US historian and an independent writer on foreign policy issues. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_28_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the imminent departure of President Saleh in Yemen (and why it hardly matters); the Egyptian model of counterrevolution, where cosmetic changes obscure the authoritarianism and US influence that remains; how international attention on Bahrain has produced recommended reforms that the government will pretend to implement; and the “made in USA” tear gas and weaponry used by Bahrain’s government to brutally put down protests.

MP3 here. (20:06)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_25_kpfk_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the lies and innuendo in the IAEA report on Iran; the whole story on Vyacheslav Danilenko, the Russian scientist accused of helping Iran’s (alleged) nuclear weapons program; former IAEA inspector Robert Kelly’s doubts about a “containment chamber” for testing high explosives used in nuclear weapons; why this “intelligence” is most likely passed on to the IAEA by Israel; how the “alleged studies” documents got the current Iranian missile design wrong (proving they are forgeries); why Iran’s cooperation varies with regard to IAEA inspections and additional protocol agreements; and how everyone is hyperventilating about stuff Iran was alleged to have done in 2003 or earlier.

MP3 here. (25:01)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_23_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses how American politicians have moved inexorably away from the republic and toward empire (witness the most recent Republican debate); how the Republican base – especially the youngest and oldest members – are developing a healthy skepticism of US foreign policy; and debunking the argument that the US can never “cut and run” because disaster will ensue.

MP3 here. (9:56)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of Liberty Defined: 50 Essential Issues That Affect Our Freedom, The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and End the Fed. His archived columns for Antiwar.com are here.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_23_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, internationally syndicated columnist and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses the mid-1980s declaration of Osama bin Laden’s mentor Abdullah Azzam that the mujahideen would go after US forces in Saudi Arabia after the Soviets were expelled from Afghanistan; taking a closer look at the “they hate us for our freedom” explanation of Islamic extremism; the angry know-nothing Republican presidential candidates (with two exceptions); and how the convergence of regional and world powers in Syria could lead to war with Iran.

MP3 here. (20:32)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Seymour Hersh

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_22_hersh.mp3]

Seymour Hersh, award winning investigative reporter for The New Yorker magazine, discusses his article “Iran and the I.A.E.A.;” how extensive CIA/JSOC espionage (and perhaps assassination and sabotage) in Iran failed to find any evidence of a clandestine nuclear weapons program; why Iran’s interest in nukes prior to 2003 was to hedge against an Iraqi weapon; the new IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano, who has no problem regurgitating old innuendo to make a case for war; and why the bluster coming out of Israel exists mostly at the top, since common sense attitudes about Iran are common in lower ranks of the military and Mossad.

MP3 here. (20:40)

Seymour M. Hersh wrote his first piece for The New Yorker in 1971 and has been a regular contributor to the magazine since 1993. His journalism and publishing awards include a Pulitzer Prize, five George Polk Awards, two National Magazine Awards, and more than a dozen other prizes for investigative reporting. As a staff writer, Hersh won a National Magazine Award for Public Interest for his 2003 articles “Lunch with the Chairman,” “Selective Intelligence,” and “The Stovepipe.” In 2004, Hersh exposed the Abu Ghraib prison scandal in a series of pieces in the magazine; in 2005, he again received a National Magazine Award for Public Interest, an Overseas Press Club award, the National Press Foundation’s Kiplinger Distinguished Contributions to Journalism award, and his fifth George Polk Award, making him that award’s most honored laureate.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_22_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses his article “Support Your Local Police State;” the history and evolution of policing in the Western world; how grand juries have changed from being tools for citizens investigating government crimes, into the playthings of prosecutors; why mall cops deserve more respect than their government employed counterparts; the difference between a law enforcement officer and a peace officer; and how Occupy Wall Street protesters are treated like “disruptive” Guantanamo prisoners.

MP3 here. (23:53)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_21_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the CIA agents “rolled up” in Iran and Lebanon because of sloppy tradecraft (like regularly meeting at a Beirut Pizza Hut); clarifying the CIA terms “officer,” “agent,” and “asset;” the Iranian agents killed from ill-conceived CIA mailing practices during Giraldi’s tenure (though he learned about it in the newspaper); how the purging of US intelligence assets could help the Iran war propaganda campaign; and why a Libyan-style regime change could soon come to Syria.

MP3 here. (21:17)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_21_escobar.mp3]

Globetrotting journalist Pepe Escobar discusses his article “China and the US: The roadmaps;” how the ever-expanding “arc of instability” could get the US into a trade war (or hot war) with China; how South American economies are gathering steam while Goldman Sachs takes over a chaotic and bankrupt Europe; possible covert US support for Muslim Chinese Uighurs; and how the US empire is being crushed by the burden of “full spectrum dominance.”

MP3 here. (27:08)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

An extreme traveler, Pepe’s nose for news has taken him to all parts of the globe. He was in Afghanistan and interviewed the military leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Masoud, a couple of weeks before his assassination. Two weeks before September 11, 2001, while Pepe was in the tribal areas of Pakistan, Asia Times Online published his prophetic piece, “Get Osama! Now! Or else …” Pepe was one of the first journalists to reach Kabul after the Taliban’s retreat, and more recently he has explored and reported from Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, US and China.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_21_morrow.mp3]

IPS News journalist Adam Morrow discusses the return of million-man protests in Tahrir Square on the eve of the first parliamentary election since Mubarak’s ouster; street skirmishes and dozens of casualties after the Egyptian military overreacted to demonstrations; fears that so-called “super constitutional principles” will keep Egypt a military dictatorship, no matter the outcome of elections; and how plans to open the Rafah border crossing with Gaza have been put on the back burner.

MP3 here. (19:49)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Glenn Greenwald

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_18_kpfk_greenwald.mp3]

Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald discusses how Gerald Ford’s pardon of Richard Nixon cut the last vestiges of the rule of law in America; the “too big to jail” justice system where powerful people need not fear incarceration; turning the Nuremberg court’s opinion on “aggressive war” on its head, as the US continually attacks countries that don’t pose a threat and government officials never face war crimes tribunals; the world-record US prison population, comprised of drug offenders and regular people who can’t afford to replace their (usually incompetent) public defender; and how US presidents refrain from prosecuting previous administrations, with the expectation that their own crimes will also go unpunished.

MP3 here. (30:33)

Glenn Greenwald is the author of With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful. He was a constitutional lawyer in New York City, first at the Manhattan firm Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, and then at the litigation firm he founded, Greenwald, Christoph. Greenwald litigated numerous high-profile and significant constitutional cases in federal and state courts around the country, including multiple First Amendment challenges. He has a J.D. from New York University School of Law (1994) and a B.A. from George Washington University (1990). In October of 2005, Greenwald started a political and legal blog, Unclaimed Territory, which quickly became one of the most popular and highest-trafficked in the blogosphere.

Upon disclosure by the New York Times in December 2005 of President Bush’s warrantless eavesdropping program, Greenwald became one of the leading and most cited experts on that controversy. In early 2006, he broke a story on his blog regarding the NSA scandal that served as the basis for front-page articles in the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers, all of which credited his blog for the story. Several months later, Sen. Russ Feingold read from one of Greenwald’s posts during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Feingold’s resolution to censure the president for violating FISA. In 2008, Sen. Chris Dodd read from Greenwald’s Salon blog during floor debate over FISA. Greenwald’s blog was also cited as one of the sources for the comprehensive report issued by Rep. John Conyers titled “The Constitution in Crisis.” In 2006, he won the Koufax Award for best new blog.

Greenwald is the author of A Tragic Legacy: How a Good vs. Evil Mentality Destroyed the Bush Presidency, How Would a Patriot Act? Defending American Values from a President Run Amok and Great American Hypocrites: Toppling the Big Myths of Republican Politics.

Kate Gould

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_17_gould.mp3]

Kate Gould, Legislative Associate for the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL), discusses her article “‘Nuclear Option’ Against Iran’s Economy Paves Way for War;” the harshest sanctions yet making their way through Congress, designed to shut down Iran’s central bank and crush their currency; language that prohibits Obama from making national security exemptions on Iran sanctions; Rep. Brad Sherman’s open admission that sanctions are designed to hurt civilians, in order to effect political change (sounding much like the definition of terrorism); and the research that shows sanctions are far more effective at starting wars than solving problems.

MP3 here. (19:57)

Kate Gould is the Legislative Associate for Foreign Policy focused on Israel-Palestine, Iran, and other Middle East issues.

Kate began her career with FCNL as a program assistant, where she served in the foreign policy program from 2007-2009. Her lobbying work at FCNL inspired her to seek first-hand knowledge of the impact of U.S. policies by traveling and working in the Middle East for nine months.

Kate taught Palestinian schoolteachers for AMIDEAST, helped coordinate a joint Israeli-Palestinian radio show at the Israel-Palestine Center for Research and Information, and worked as a freelance journalist in the West Bank. In Gaza, she documented the impact of the blockade on civil society organizations in a report for the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv in conjunction with the Rebuilding Alliance, a U.S. NGO. Kate also interned for Senator Jeff Merkley both in southern Oregon and in his Washington, DC office.

Prior to re-joining FCNL’s foreign policy program, Kate served as the Director of Advocacy and Outreach for Just Foreign Policy.

Kate completed her undergraduate study of International Development and Political Science at Western Washington University and studied abroad in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Zanzibar/Tanzania.

Robert P. Murphy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_18_murphy.mp3]

Robert P. Murphy, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, discusses his article “The Economics of War;” how open markets and free trade make expansionist states and war unnecessary; a cost/benefit analysis of empire and “war for oil;” and the $15 trillion US debt (a trillion here, a trillion there, and soon you’re talking real money).

MP3 here. (22:47)

Robert P. Murphy is an adjunct scholar of the Mises Institute, where he teaches at the Mises Academy. He runs the blog Free Advice and is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal, and his newest book, Lessons for the Young Economist.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_17_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses his article “Will Washington Thump the Syrian Domino;” how the Obama administration’s belligerent foreign policy almost makes you pine for the wisdom and restraint of George W. Bush; the unwinding of poorly-conceived post-colonial countries, including Syria and Iraq; reports that Saudi Prince Bandar is forming an al-Qaeda style posse to fight in Syria, with US consent; and the collusion between current and former US government officials and the MEK terrorist group.

MP3 here. (19:48)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Eric Newhouse

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_17_newhouse.mp3]

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Eric Newhouse discusses his article “Half of Vets Returning From Iraq and Afghanistan Need Medical Attention;” how advances in emergency medical treatment have greatly decreased battlefield fatalities from catastrophic injuries – though surviving soldiers often have debilitating brain injuries and require lifelong care; how the VA‘s increased budget has improved the quality of care (but not nearly enough); and the wasted lives of mostly poor and patriotic soldiers who were sent to fight and die in stupid wars.

MP3 here. (18:27)

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Eric Newhouse is the author of two books: Alcohol: Cradle to Grave and Faces of Combat: PTSD and TBI. He writes the Invisible Wounds blog at Psychology Today. A retired editor of the Great Falls (Mont.) Tribune, Newhouse won the Pulitzer Prize for explanatory journalism in 2000 for a 12-part series of stories on the effects of alcoholism in Montana. He also served as a juror for the 2007 and 2008 Pulitzer Prizes.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_17_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses why the talking heads on MSNBC are perfectly willing to make fools of themselves in an effort to prove the IAEA’s case against Iran; why crimes like cyberterrorism (Stuxnet) don’t count when committed by the US/Israel against Iranian targets; the Reuters report on what Iraqis think about the “democracy” given to them at the end of an American gun barrel; and the contingent of troops headed to Australia to remind China that the “peer competitor” policy remains in effect.

MP3 here. (23:50)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

Muhammad Sahimi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_16_sahimi.mp3]

Muhammad Sahimi, Professor of Chemical Engineering and political columnist on Iran issues, discusses the specific accusations against Iran in the IAEA report; the truth about the “Soviet nuclear scientist,” the “exploding bridge wire” detonators, and old recycled allegations from Olli Heinonen and Israeli intelligence; and how Iran has never been given access to the “stolen laptop” documents – or the computer itself – and can’t properly respond to allegations or conduct a digital forensic investigation.

MP3 here. (20:03)

Muhammad Sahimi, Professor of chemical engineering & materials science and the National Iranian Oil Company chair in petroleum engineering at the University of Southern California, has published extensively on Iran’s political development and its nuclear program. He is the lead political columnist for the web site PBS/Frontline/Tehran Bureau, blogs at The Huffington Post, and contributes regularly to antiwar.com and National Public Radio on issues related to Iran.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_16_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses all the ways you can donate to Antiwar.com (but no lima beans please); Defense Secretary Leon Panetta getting chewed out by the Senate Armed Services Committee for withdrawing from Iraq per the 2008 SOFA signed by President Bush (though Obama certainly tried to stay longer); the proposed agreement that will allow the US occupation of Afghanistan to continue through 2024; and how Pakistan’s military relied on Google Earth maps to target its tribal areas for bombing.

MP3 here. (21:15)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Mark and Ian

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_16_mark_and_ian.mp3]

Mark and Ian, co-hosts of the talk radio show Free Talk Live on the Liberty Radio Network, discuss the hazards of doing a libertarian antiwar show on commercial radio; losing advertisers and affiliate stations for their insufficiently-deferential Veteran’s Day show; and why real military heroism and bravery is exemplified by Ehren Watada’s refusal to deploy and violate the Constitution, not by soldiers blindly following orders and killing civilians to avoid a dishonorable discharge.

MP3 here. (19:52)

Mark and Ian co-host the talk radio show Free Talk Live.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_15_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the fund drive at Antiwar.com (donate); a brief chronicle of the 10+ US wars around the world, extralegal drone strike assassinations, and the prelude to a war with Iran; how the staff at Antiwar.com works tirelessly to keep readers informed about US foreign policy; and how Antiwar.com has helped broaden the base of antiwar activists so the movement is no longer exclusively Leftist.

MP3 here. (19:30)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

Richard Silverstein

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_15_silverstein.mp3]

Richard Silverstein, writer of the Tikun Olam blog, discusses the story he broke on the Mossad-MEK sabotage of an Iranian missile base that killed 17 soldiers and the head of Iran’s missile program; whether a foreign attack on a military installation is an act of terrorism or a declaration of war; Israel’s “black ops” strategy of assassination and sabotage, used in lieu of a direct attack on Iran – for now; Bibi Netanyahu’s frightening megalomania and aspirations of being a Jewish Winston Churchill; and why Israel can’t continue its campaign against Iran indefinitely without facing blowback in some form.

MP3 here. (18:34)

Richard Silverstein has been writing Tikun Olam, one of the earliest liberal Jewish blogs, since February, 2003. It focuses on Israeli-Palestinian peace but includes commentary on U.S. politics, a world music mp3 blog, and other writing on Jewish life, literature, and culture.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_15_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, internationally syndicated columnist and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses his article “Nuclear Pots Call Iranian Kettle Black;” why Iran hasn’t developed nuclear weapons despite having incentives to do so; the US-sourced chemical and biological warfare agents used by Saddam Hussein against Iran in the 1980s; why Iran is far more likely to be “wiped off the map” by Israel than the other way around; and how Syria – as the last Arab state not subservient to the US – is being torn apart by genuine popular discontent as well as Western and Israeli interference.

MP3 here. (29:52)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Andrew Bacevich

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_14_bacevich.mp3]

Andrew Bacevich, Professor of International Relations at Boston University and author of The Short American Century: A Postmortem, discusses his article “The Passing of the Postwar Era;” the major factors leading to a “transformative” decline in US power and prestige on the world stage; the American political elites who are driving the country into a ditch; the redundancy or counter-productivity of overseas bases (excepting the Asia Pacific region); and the lack of “prudent” decision making in Washington D.C.

MP3 here. (10:18)

Andrew J. Bacevich is Professor of International Relations and History at Boston University. A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, he received his PhD in American Diplomatic History from Princeton University. Before joining the faculty of Boston University, he taught at West Point and Johns Hopkins.

Bacevich is the author of Washington Rules: America’s Path to Permanent War (2010).  His previous books include The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism (2008);  The Long War: A New History of US National Security Policy since World War II (2007) (editor); The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War (2005); and American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U. S. Diplomacy (2002). His essays and reviews have appeared in a variety of scholarly and general interest publications including The Wilson Quarterly, The National Interest, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, The Nation, and The New Republic. His op-eds have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Boston Globe, and Los Angeles Times, among other newspapers.

In 2004, Dr. Bacevich was a Berlin Prize Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. He has also held fellowships at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Brian Phillips

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_14_phillips.mp3]

Brian Phillips, author of the Truth And Culture blog, discusses his article “Saturday Night Frights” about the most recent GOP presidential debate; the Republican candidates playing to their pro-war and pro-torture constituents; why regular people who occasionally read a newspaper are better informed than half the presidential contenders (especially the front runners); and why Ron Paul – the lone voice of reason in the GOP – somehow gets less airtime than Rick Santorum.

MP3 here. (20:05)

Dr. Brian Phillips works as a pastor, history and philosophy teacher, and writer.

Tom Engelhardt

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_09_engelhardt.mp3]

Tom Engelhardt, creator of Tomdispatch.com and author of The United States of Fear, discusses how the Bush administration’s version of the American Dream is dying on the vine; the dull-eyed Obama administration bureaucrats who have unthinkingly carried on the plans of radical visionaries from the Bush era; how Hillary Clinton’s imperial hubris makes her immune from logical contradictions (e.g.: “US forces are in the Persian Gulf to prevent foreign interference”); and why the Iraq War has become a clear defeat for the US, despite the middling security detail and giant embassy that remain.

MP3 here. (20:11)

Tom Engelhardt created and runs the Tomdispatch.com website, a project of The Nation Institute where he is a Fellow. He is the author of The American Way of War: How Bush’s Wars Became Obama’s, a highly praised history of American triumphalism in the Cold War, The End of Victory Culture, and of a novel, The Last Days of Publishing, as well as a collection of his Tomdispatch interviews, Mission Unaccomplished. Each spring he is a Teaching Fellow at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.

Kit Kittredge

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_10_kittredge.mp3]

Code Pink activist Kit Kittredge discusses her participation in the most recent Gaza flotilla that was intercepted by Israeli warships in international waters; how American tax dollars pay for Israel’s weaponry, making the US complicit in human rights violations; drawing attention to Israel’s apartheid state by repeatedly challenging the illegal blockade of Gaza; why activists arrested in Israel shouldn’t count on their embassies to help them out; and how Gaza is being systematically strangulated, as Israel destroys its infrastructure and commerce and prevents rebuilding.

MP3 here. (22:49)

Kit Kittredge is an activist with Code Pink.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_11_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the US-influenced drug war in Mexico; how harsh drug crackdowns lead to more hardened criminals taking over the enterprise; the DEA’s five commando-style militarized squads of drug enforcers operating in much of Central America; why the War on Drugs hasn’t reduced drug use in the US; why it makes sense to allow legal businesses to manufacture and sell drugs, and treat drug abuse as a health issue; how the US plays one Mexican drug cartel against another, spiking murder rates; and the sweetheart deals for connected bigwigs who can transport cocaine with impunity (like in Honduras).

MP3 here. (19:48)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

Jim Powell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_11_powell.mp3]

Jim Powell, historian, author and senior fellow at the Cato Institute, discusses his classic article for Armistice Day “What We Can Learn From Woodrow Wilson’s Great Blunder;” how US entry into WWI ended the stalemate that would have produced negotiated settlements and paved the way for Lenin, Stalin, Hitler and WWII; how Wilson’s weak negotiating skills failed to prevent the vengeful Treaty of Versailles and the rise of German nationalism; how “war socialism” contributed more to post-war German hyperinflation than reparation payments; the Ottoman Empire’s destruction and subsequent formation of ill-conceived new countries; and the tens of millions killed by their own communist governments in Russia and China.

MP3 here. (31:28)

Jim Powell, senior fellow at the CATO Institute, is an expert in the history of liberty. He has lectured in England, Germany, Japan, Argentina and Brazil as well as at Harvard, Stanford and other universities across the United States. He has written for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Esquire, Audacity/American Heritage and other publications.

He is the author of several books, including Wilson’s War: How Woodrow Wilson’s Great Blunder Led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin and World War II and The Triumph of Liberty, A 2,000 Year History Told Through The Lives Of Freedom’s Greatest Champions (Free Press, 2000), with a foreword by Paul Johnson. This book chronicles heroic struggles against tyranny, slavery, war and mass murder. Powell’s book FDR’s Folly, How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression (2003) reported a wide range of findings – ignored by political historians and biographers – about the unexpected consequences of New Deal policies. Thomas Sowell wrote: “Only now has a book been written in language that non-economists can understand which argues persuasively that the policies of the Roosevelt administration actually prolonged the depression and made it worse.”

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_11_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Research Editor at the Independent Institute, discusses his article on Armistice Day; how a day celebrating the end of WWI became “Veteran’s Day” in the US where the military is revered and militarism relished; the frequent reminders that the US government doesn’t care about its soldiers or veterans; and how multiple simultaneous wars – with indefinite durations – have become the new normal.

MP3 here. (19:45)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor, San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Stephen Zunes

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_10_zunes.mp3]

Dr. Stephen Zunes, Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, discusses his article “Obama to Aid Uzbek Dictatorship;” how the US went from arming Islamic extremists to fight Communism in the 1980s to arming Communists to fight Islamic extremists today; Islam Karimov’s dystopian Uzbekistan, where political parties and unsanctioned religions are banned, government farms are harvested by forced child labor, and exotic horrible tortures await dissidents; and why Congress and Obama have decided US supply lines to Afghanistan are more important than “exporting democracy.”

MP3 here. (18:02)

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he chairs the program in Middle Eastern Studies. A native of North Carolina, Professor Zunes received his PhD. from Cornell University, his M.A. from Temple University and his B.A. from Oberlin College. He has previously served on the faculty of Ithaca College, the University of Puget Sound, and Whitman College. He serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, an associate editor of Peace Review, and chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

Flynt Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_09_leverett.mp3]

Flynt Leverett, former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, discusses how the most crucial part of the IAEA report on Iran – that declared nuclear material isn’t being diverted to weapons manufacturing – has been buried under a heap of unsubstantiated rumors and accusations; the evidence that new IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano is much more cozy with the US than his predecessor Mohamed ElBaradei; why those who defend Iran’s rights under the NPT aren’t necessarily minions of the Ayatollah; the equally-wacky end-times theology of the major Abrahamic religions; and why Israel’s real “existential threat” is from losing the support of Jews worldwide, not from an incredibly improbable Iran attack.

MP3 here. (30:05)

Flynt Leverett runs The Race For Iran blog and teaches at Pennsylvania State University’s School of International Affairs. Additionally, he directs the Iran Project at the New America Foundation, where he is a Senior Research Fellow.

Dr. Leverett is a leading authority on the Middle East and Persian Gulf, U.S. foreign policy, and global energy affairs. From 1992 to 2003, he had a distinguished career in the U.S. government, serving as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a CIA Senior Analyst. He left the George W. Bush Administration and government service in 2003 because of disagreements about Middle East policy and the conduct of the war on terror.

Dr. Leverett’s 2006 monograph, Dealing With Tehran: Assessing U.S. Diplomatic Options Toward Iran, presented the seminal argument for a U.S.-Iranian “grand bargain”, an idea that he has developed in multiple articles and Op Eds in The New York Times, The National Interest, POLITICO, Salon, Washington Monthly, and the New America Foundation’s “Big Ideas for a New America” series.

Muhammad Sahimi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_10_sahimi.mp3]

Muhammad Sahimi, Professor of Chemical Engineering and political columnist on Iran issues, discusses his article “The IAEA Report on Iran’s Nuclear Program: Alarming or Hyped;” recycling the old “smoking laptop” documents into new allegations against Iran; debunking the story about a Russian nuclear scientist who supposedly helped Iran with nuclear weapons; leaving Iranians to form their own opposition parties without foreign interference; why David Albright won’t give up the Iran-propaganda business and get an honest job; how the 2007 and 2011 NIEs contradict IAEA claims about Iran’s nuclear weapons capabilities; the “Bolton plan” of pestering Iran until they withdraw from the NPT – so a war can begin; and Iran’s long history of pragmatic foreign policy decisions, including cooperating with the US and Israel in various circumstances.

MP3 here. (42:14)

Muhammad Sahimi, Professor of chemical engineering & materials science and the National Iranian Oil Company chair in petroleum engineering at the University of Southern California, has published extensively on Iran’s political development and its nuclear program. He is the lead political columnist for the web site PBS/Frontline/Tehran Bureau, blogs at The Huffington Post, and contributes regularly to antiwar.com and National Public Radio on issues related to Iran.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_09_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses the ten-year-long miscarriage of justice at Guantanamo; why Obama hasn’t expended any political capital to close the prison or end military commissions; the mere six Guantanamo prisoners who have either accepted a plea deal or been convicted of a crime; and why the Obama administration won’t release USS Cole bombing suspect Abdul Rahim al-Nashiri even if he is acquitted, making a mockery of the “justice” system.

MP3 here. (19:47)

Andy Worthington writes regularly for newspapers and websites including the Guardian, Truthout, Cageprisoners, and the Future of Freedom Foundation. He writes occasionally for the Daily Star, Lebanon, the Huffington Post, Antiwar.com, CounterPunch, AlterNet, and ZNet. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

Flynt Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_08_leverett.mp3]

Flynt Leverett, former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, discusses why the IAEA’s job in Iran is verifying the non-diversion of nuclear materials for making weapons, not publicizing the assertions of foreign intelligence agencies; how “journalist” David Sanger of the NY Times continues his personal crusade against Iran, truth be damned; why Iran’s alleged theoretical study of nuclear weapons, including the testing of high explosives, still does not violate the NPT; the dubious legality of UN Security Council resolutions prohibiting Iran from enjoying its rights to nuclear energy as an NPT signatory; and why an Israeli airstrike on Iran’s nuclear facilities would only work if they used nuclear weapons – or dragged the US into the war.

MP3 here. (20:44)

Flynt Leverett runs The Race For Iran blog and teaches at Pennsylvania State University’s School of International Affairs. Additionally, he directs the Iran Project at the New America Foundation, where he is a Senior Research Fellow.

Dr. Leverett is a leading authority on the Middle East and Persian Gulf, U.S. foreign policy, and global energy affairs. From 1992 to 2003, he had a distinguished career in the U.S. government, serving as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a CIA Senior Analyst. He left the George W. Bush Administration and government service in 2003 because of disagreements about Middle East policy and the conduct of the war on terror.

Dr. Leverett’s 2006 monograph, Dealing With Tehran: Assessing U.S. Diplomatic Options Toward Iran, presented the seminal argument for a U.S.-Iranian “grand bargain”, an idea that he has developed in multiple articles and Op Eds in The New York Times, The National Interest, POLITICO, Salon, Washington Monthly, and the New America Foundation’s “Big Ideas for a New America” series.

Almerindo Ojeda

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_08_ojeda.mp3]

Almerindo Ojeda, professor at UC Davis and director of the Study of Human Rights in the Americas, discusses his article “Death in Guantanamo: Suicide or Dryboarding;” continuing the investigation began by “the other” Scott Horton at Harper’s Magazine into the suspicious deaths of three Guantanamo prisoners at Camp “No;” the similarites between Ali Al-Marri’s “dryboarding” torture at a Naval brig in South Carolina and the treatment of the Guantanamo Three; and the need for an independent investigation not led by the Pentagon.

MP3 here. (19:59)

Almerindo E. Ojeda is the founding director of the University of California at Davis Center for the Study of Human Rights in the Americas and the principal investigator for its flagship Guantánamo Testimonials Project.

M.J. Rosenberg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_07_rosenberg.mp3]

M.J. Rosenberg, journalist and Senior Foreign Policy Fellow at Media Matters Action Network, discusses his article “‘Attack Iran’ and AIPAC’s infamous chutzpah;” the AIPAC-sponsored bill in Congress that bans diplomacy or negotiations of any kind with Iran; how the “lobby” channels influence from Bibi Netanyahu straight to Congress; AIPAC’s ability to craft US foreign policy legislation, especially that pertaining to Iran sanctions; how a similar diplomatic prohibition in 1962 would have turned the Cuban Missile Crisis into WW III; the brief schism between the lobby and Israel’s government during Yitzhak Rabin’s peace process; and how an Iran war will endanger Israel and the US and force Iran to withdraw from the NPT and make a deterrent nuclear weapon for real.

MP3 here. (23:24)

M.J. Rosenberg is Senior Foreign Policy Fellow at Media Matters Action Network. Previously, he worked on Capitol Hill for various Democratic members of the House and Senate for 15 years. He was also a Clinton political appointee at USAID. In the early 1980s, he was editor of AIPACs weekly newsletter Near East Report. From 1998-2009, he was director of policy at Israel Policy Forum.

John Feffer

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_07_feffer.mp3]

John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, discusses his article “Closing Overseas Bases Is Good Policy and Good Politics;” why chances for peace on the Korean peninsula should improve after the next (Korean) election; the known unknowns on North Korea’s nuclear arsenal; why a mass closure of foreign US military bases would almost certainly result in Japan’s militarization; and the bipartisan Congressional proposals to close bases and cut military spending.

MP3 here. (20:18)

John Feffer is co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies. His webpage is JohnFeffer.com.

He is the author of several books and numerous articles. He has been a Writing Fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC and a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University. He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia. He has taught a graduate level course on international conflict at Sungkonghoe University in Seoul in July 2001 and delivered lectures at a variety of academic institutions including New York University, Hofstra, Union College, Cornell University, and Sofia University (Tokyo).

John has been widely interviewed in print and on radio. He serves on the advisory committees of the Alliance of Scholars Concerned about Korea. He is a recipient of the Herbert W. Scoville fellowship and has been a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation. He currently lives with his partner Karin Lee in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Francis Nesbitt

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_04_kpfk_nesbitt.mp3]

Dr. Francis Njubi Nesbitt, Associate Professor of Africana Studies at San Diego State University, discusses his article “History Repeats Itself With Somalia Invasion;” the many failed interventions and proxy wars involving the US, Ethiopia and Kenya; how al-Shabab rose to prominence after the US-backed Ethiopian invasion of Somalia in 2006; Kenya’s current plan to seize the Somali port city of Kismayo and cut off a significant source of income for al-Shabab; why clan-based cultures are not conducive to central governance; how oil pipeline routes figure into African conflicts; and Somalia’s severe famine that has hundreds of thousands at risk of starvation.

MP3 here. (28:13)

Francis Njubi Nesbitt is a Foreign Policy in Focus contributor and teaches African politics and conflict resolution at San Diego State University. He is the author of Race for Sanctions (Indiana University Press, 2004) and is completing a book on peacemaking in the Horn of Africa.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_04_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “ISAF Data: Night Raids Killed Over 1,500 Afghan Civilians;” how the Pashtun honor code (and that of most other cultures as well) prompts men to defend their families and neighbors from foreign occupiers raiding their homes; Stanley McChrystal’s admission that family defense is often misinterpreted as an “insurgent act” in Afghanistan; and why the US sees nearly every Afghan civilian as an insurgent, thanks to bad intelligence and the military’s record-keeping practices.

MP3 here. (20:11)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Philip Weiss

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_04_weiss.mp3]

Philip Weiss, investigative journalist and author of the blog MondoWeiss, discusses the small, secret Gaza aid flotilla that was thwarted by Israeli warships; why Israel’s four year blockade of Gaza amounts to state terrorism against a civilian population; comparing the US response to Operation Cast Lead (in which over 1000 Palestinians were killed) and the allegedly forthcoming massacre of Libyan rebels in Benghazi; how aid flotillas succeed at grabbing international attention and further isolating the US diplomatically, even when they fail to deliver cargo; how Palestinian membership in UNESCO has forced the US to choose between protecting American corporations and coddling Israel; and why Americans still aren’t well informed about Israel/Palestine issues.

MP3 here. (19:59)

Philip Weiss is an investigative journalist who has written for The Nation, New York Times Magazine, The American Conservative, Jewish World Review and other publications. He is the author of American Taboo: A Murder in the Peace Corps.

Brian Phillips

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_03_phillips.mp3]

Brian Phillips, author of the Truth And Culture blog, discusses his article “The Imperial Boomerang Returns;” why conducting wars abroad inevitably leads to tyranny at home; the weapons of war returning to America in the form of Texas sheriffs with drone aircraft; why the US empire is economically and morally unsustainable; the veteran soldiers-turned cops who will be using their night-raid experience in Afghanistan (and the same dubious intelligence) when doing drug busts in their hometowns; and why “collateral damage” isn’t just for foreigners anymore.

MP3 here. (18:30)

Dr. Brian Phillips works as a pastor, history and philosophy teacher, and writer.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_03_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the Ugandan government’s crackdown on peaceful dissent just as the US sends combat troops to help them fight opponents of freedom and democracy; how the UK and IAEA are ramping expectations of an imminent war with Iran; why the US and Israel – not Iran – are opposed to a nuclear-free Middle East; how the military’s reluctance to start another conflict could keep the US limited to a war of words with Iran; and Paul Wolfotitz’s lame-brained idea for a Plan Colombia in Afghanistan.

MP3 here. (28:25)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

Becky Akers

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_03_akers.mp3]

Becky Akers, columnist at Lewrockwell.com, discusses her blog post “Déjà Vu for the Tenth Time This Year” about the repeated arrests of TSA screeners who can’t keep their hands off kids; how government agents are empowered to essentially molest children and view pornography in their official capacities, but arrested for doing the same things outside work; what a private security alternative to the TSA would look like; the long history of government influence in the US airline industry; and why a government powerful enough to persecute minorities will eventually subjugate everyone else too.

MP3 here. (25:48)

Becky Akers, an expert on the American Revolution, writes frequently about issues related to security and privacy. Her articles and columns have been published by LewRockwell.com, Campaign for Liberty, The Freeman, Military History Magazine, American History Magazine, the Christian Science Monitor, the New York Post, and other publications.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_01_morrow.mp3]

IPS News journalist Adam Morrow discusses his article “Doubts Shadow Egyptian Election;” remembering the rigged parliamentary polls of 2010 as former Mubarak officials jostle for position in the upcoming elections; how the dozens of newly formed parties have greatly complicated the task of following Egyptian politics; why the Camp David Accords with Israel will remain intact no matter who wins in Egypt; and how former IAEA Director General Mohamed El Baradei has faded from political prominence.

MP3 here. (20:06)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Brandon Neely

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_01_neely.mp3]

Former Guantanamo prison guard Brandon Neely discusses the first six months Guantanamo was open for business (covered here by CNN) when no guidelines existed for prisoner treatment; why the guards thought all Gitmo prisoners were 9/11 terrorists and treated them accordingly (as it turns out the vast majority were not guilty of anything); covering up brutal prisoner beatings by Initial Reaction Force (IRF) teams; how soldiers and prisoners alike are bullied into keeping quiet about their experiences at Guantanamo; and why Gitmo is a “black eye on America.”

MP3 here. (22:27)

Brandon Neely is a former Guantanamo prison guard and current Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW) member.