Scott Horton Interviews Robert P. Murphy

Scott Horton, November 20, 2011

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Robert P. Murphy, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, discusses his article “The Economics of War;” how open markets and free trade make expansionist states and war unnecessary; a cost/benefit analysis of empire and “war for oil;” and the $15 trillion US debt (a trillion here, a trillion there, and soon you’re talking real money).

MP3 here. (22:47)

Robert P. Murphy is an adjunct scholar of the Mises Institute, where he teaches at the Mises Academy. He runs the blog Free Advice and is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal, and his newest book, Lessons for the Young Economist.

8 Responses to “Robert P. Murphy”

  1. FICTION LOGIC — SEE LIBYA

    Just last week the heads of business and government in England had media saturated with urgent calls for their reconstruction industry to quick fly to Libya — billions upon billions of quick profit for those who get there first. Comes now Murphy to say only in socialism could that be true”

    “Someone may say, ’That’s so heartless, how come you don’t want the government to rebuild the war damage we caused?’

    “But, if the government is in charge of helping, if your a big company that can get those kinds of contracts, your going to have an incentive to cause the disaster in the first place. In the case of war, your going to be lobbying the government behind the scenes to go ahead and invade because your going to get all those billions of dollars in reconstruction contracts.”

    Bottom line — it all depends on who is paying the bills.

  2. The nonconservative is against everything that is good about Americanism. Their intervention is about monopoly and exclusive rights to resources and contracts. It has nothing to do with free market economy. Recent intervention is about neocolonialism and neocolonialism or colonialism kills the free markets and is a disastrous to productivity. The nonconservative loves colonialism. They oppose class-based identity and society, they are thus both anti-bourgeois and anti-proletarian; and against individualist based identity and society. They are opposed to many ideologies, including conservatism, liberalism, and two major forms of socialism: communism and social democracy. They opposes a variety of economic, political and social systems, they are opposed to democracy, parliamentary systems, and they are fundamentally anti-clerical, and holds a distinctive opposition to "capitalism". They reject egalitarianism, materialism, and rationalism in favour of action, discipline, hierarchy, spirit and will.

  3. Was it Mises who wrote the jingle "I'd like to teach the world to sing" … and Coke's ad guys who changed the line "… in free market harmony.", to "… in perfect harmony."?

    Okay, so the hippies in the 60's were entranced by this pie-in-sky vision, but at least they could point to LSD as the culprit. So what's Mises' excuse?

    And never mind all that; the weapons of war have already made war obsolete. We, and/or our NATO allies already fight "tactical limited engagements" because to fight an "actual war" – to actually unleash all of DARPA's dreams and nightmares, would lead to unimaginable death and destruction.

    Eventually, I think this will prove to be true, much sooner than any world-wide agreement to live in peaceful co-existence based on open and free markets.

  4. What does "oil" have to do with any of this madness? Countries don't self-destruct over a commodity. The Empire's global rampage isn't about "oil", it's about a group of deranged, bloodthirsty madmen who believe that there should be world government and that they should be in charge of it.

  5. If I understood you correctly – This is what is happening in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, etc. Arab countries…! And will happen soon in Libya.. "Is it not?"

  6. In each case the formula is a little different but the bottom line is something akin neocolonialism with large economic block participation such as in EU in Libya. It seems to be a knee jerk reaction to the realization that the playing field with China and other economic powers is unlikely to ever be a level and rather than holding the free market high ground we are giving in and going for a type of global protectionism. I cannot see how this will work out well if folks do not even recognize it for what it is and keep asserting that we are just acting like free market capitalist. The negative economic effects for colonialism are well documented as a loss loss for all except for the corporations that are in bed with the politicians. Perhaps they see it as a quick fix while we align for the next major conflict.

    Did free market capitalism die along with the Soviet Union?

  7. I'm sitting here in the Middle East, and I don't see anyone drinking local brands of soft drinks. They're still drinking Coke, Pepsi, 7-up, Fanta, and just about every other American brand…

  8. Artur, What an awesome suggestion. I hope Weebly will agree and make our re-branded sites available for new direct client registrations. We should have something like an affiliate link for marketing.

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