Flynt Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_28_leverett.mp3]

Flynt Leverett, former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, discusses Iran’s threat to close the Strait of Hormuz, as a response to sanctions that may eventually cut off Iran’s oil exports; why the US and Israel don’t really have a problem with Iranian nuclear weapons, just Iran’s refusal to submit to US regional hegemony; Israel’s “red line” on Iran’s uranium enrichment at Qom; why US foreign policy planners don’t learn from prior mistakes (because superpowers don’t have to); and why waging war with borrowed money is a sure sign of a declining empire.

MP3 here. (25:23)

Flynt Leverett runs The Race For Iran blog and teaches at Pennsylvania State University’s School of International Affairs. Additionally, he directs the Iran Project at the New America Foundation, where he is a Senior Research Fellow.

Dr. Leverett is a leading authority on the Middle East and Persian Gulf, U.S. foreign policy, and global energy affairs. From 1992 to 2003, he had a distinguished career in the U.S. government, serving as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a CIA Senior Analyst. He left the George W. Bush Administration and government service in 2003 because of disagreements about Middle East policy and the conduct of the war on terror.

Dr. Leverett’s 2006 monograph, Dealing With Tehran: Assessing U.S. Diplomatic Options Toward Iran, presented the seminal argument for a U.S.-Iranian “grand bargain”, an idea that he has developed in multiple articles and Op Eds in The New York Times, The National Interest, POLITICO, Salon, Washington Monthly, and the New America Foundation’s “Big Ideas for a New America” series.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_27_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “Crackpot Anti-Islam Activists, ‘Serial Fabricators’ and the Tale of Iran and 9/11;” the US court judgement finding Iran liable for the 9/11 attacks in a civil lawsuit brought by victims’ families; the testimony of an Iranian defector, previously discredited as a “serial fabricator;” the alleged secret meeting between Iran’s leadership and OBL’s son, complete with miniaturized models of 9/11 targets and an ominously dangling toy missile; the anti-Islam groups peddling a grossly exaggerated, conspiratorial narrative in “Protocols of the Elders of Zion” style; and how Iran’s passport-stamping practices have become the basis of “material support” of al-Qaeda charges.

MP3 here. (29:04)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear at Truthout, Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Jesse Trentadue

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_27_trentadue.mp3]

Jesse Trentadue, attorney and brother of Kenneth Trentadue (who was probably tortured and killed by FBI agents mistaking him for Richard Lee Guthrie – a.k.a. John Doe No. 2 – in the wake of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing), discusses Attorney General Eric Holder’s role (as Deputy AG during the Clinton administration) in quashing Senator Orrin Hatch’s planned hearing on Kenneth’s death; the foreknowledge of the Oklahoma City bombing by the FBI and DOJ; the FBI’s “Patriot Conspiracy” (PATCON) program, created to infiltrate right wing extremist groups and incite – rather than prevent – violent attacks; and PATCON’s involvement in Ruby Ridge, Waco and OKC.

MP3 here. (24:27)

Scott’s collection of OKC audio clips here.

Scott’s collection of Jesse Trentadue’s court files here.

Interviews of the late J.D. Cash, Roger Charles, James Ridgeway, Frederic Whitehurst, Rick Ojeda and others on the Oklahoma City Bombing available here.

Jesse Trentadue is an attorney in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_22_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the large bombings in Iraq after US withdrawal; Prime Minister Maliki’s attempt to arrest Vice President Tareq Hashemi as a “terrorist;” Iraq’s coalition government falling apart, as Maliki overreaches; the 700 US troops scheduled to remain behind as trainers; the military’s report justifying the fatal US air attack on Pakistani border posts; back-channel negotiations between the US and Pakistan’s civilian government to undermine the Pakistani military’s power; and indications NATO is staying in Afghanistan for the long haul.

MP3 here. (23:57)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Stephen Zunes

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_22_kpfk_zunes.mp3]

Dr. Stephen Zunes, Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, discusses the Arab Spring as the culmination of decades of peaceful rebellion against tyrannical governments; why nonviolent protests are more inclusive and tougher to eradicate; why the Libyan revolution was not in the Arab Spring mold (more like a foreign intervention/regime change); how violent revolutions tend to breed more violence and result in authoritarian governments; how the Bush administration helped bring down Middle East/North African client dictators (without meaning to); and the status of Syria, Yemen, Bahrain, Morocco and Algeria.

MP3 here. (28:44)

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he chairs the program in Middle Eastern Studies. A native of North Carolina, Professor Zunes received his PhD. from Cornell University, his M.A. from Temple University and his B.A. from Oberlin College. He has previously served on the faculty of Ithaca College, the University of Puget Sound, and Whitman College. He serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, an associate editor of Peace Review, and chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

Barbara Slavin

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_21_slavin.mp3]

Barbara Slavin, author of Bitter Friends, Bosom Enemies: Iran, the U.S. and the Twisted Path to Confrontation, discusses her article “Mass Tragedy Feared as Closure of MEK Camp Looms;” how MEK leader Maryam Rajavi is using the camp residents as pawns while pressuring the State Department to remove the group’s terrorist status; the proposed 2003 prisoner swap (MEK for al-Qaeda) between the US and Iran that was scuttled by Doug Feith and Paul Wolfowitz; and how UN interviews with MEK members (to arrange relocation after Camp Ashraf’s closing) could reveal brainwashing and other unflattering cult-like behavior.

MP3 here. (21:27)

Barbara Slavin is an expert on U.S. foreign policy and the author of a 2007 book on Iran entitled “Bitter Friends, Bosom Enemies: Iran, the U.S. and the Twisted Path to Confrontation.” A nonresident senior fellow at The Atlantic Council specializing on Iran, Ms. Slavin is also a contributor to AOLNews.com and Foreignpolicy.com among other media outlets.  Ms. Slavin was Assistant Managing Editor for World and National Security of The Washington Times in 2008-09. Prior to that, she served for 12 years as senior diplomatic reporter for USA TODAY where she covered such key issues as the U.S.-led war on terrorism and in Iraq, policy toward “rogue” states and the Arab-Israeli conflict. She accompanied three secretaries of State on their official travels and also reported solo from Iran, Libya, Israel, Egypt, North Korea, Russia, China, Saudi Arabia and Syria. Ms. Slavin, who has lived in Russia, China, Japan and Egypt, is a regular commentator on U.S. foreign policy on National Public Radio, the Public Broadcasting System and C-Span. She wrote her book on Iran, which she has visited seven times, as a public policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in 2006 and spent October 2007-July 2008 as senior fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace, where she researched and wrote a report on Iranian regional influence, entitled “Mullahs, Money and Militias: How Iran Exerts Its Influence in the Middle East.”

M.J. Rosenberg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_20_rosenberg.mp3]

M.J. Rosenberg, journalist and Senior Foreign Policy Fellow at Media Matters Action Network, discusses his article “The ‘Israel Firster’ Brouhaha” about the Politico article chiding Media Matters for supposedly trying to turn the Democratic Party establishment against Israel; AIPAC’s dossiers on journalists (including M.J.) unwilling to parrot Likud Party talking points; the political risk-reward calculation that makes almost the entire Congress rabidly pro-Israel; why even Tom Friedman understands Netanyahu’s fawning reception in Congress was “bought and paid for by the Israel lobby;” Israel’s demographic change from secular liberal Jews to religious right-wing Russian immigrants; and why those who really love Israel oppose war with Iran.

MP3 here. (20:05)

M.J. Rosenberg is Senior Foreign Policy Fellow at Media Matters Action Network. Previously, he worked on Capitol Hill for various Democratic members of the House and Senate for 15 years. He was also a Clinton political appointee at USAID. In the early 1980s, he was editor of AIPACs weekly newsletter Near East Report. From 1998-2009, he was director of policy at Israel Policy Forum.

John Feffer

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_19_feffer.mp3]

John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, discusses his article “Two Leaders, Two Deaths,” comparing the legacies of former Czech president Vaclav Havel and N. Korean “dear leader” Kim Jong Il; Czechoslovakia’s Velvet Revolution and Havel’s mixed-bag presidency, where his aspiration of “moral government” fell short in implementation; Kim Jong Il’s ability to defy the US and maintain his hermit kingdom (paid for by Koreans who suffered a repressive police state and starved to death by the millions); and the chance for food-for-nukes negotiations between the US and N. Korea’s successor regime.

MP3 here. (20:05)

John Feffer is co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies. His webpage is JohnFeffer.com.

He is the author of several books and numerous articles. He has been a Writing Fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC and a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University. He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia. He has taught a graduate level course on international conflict at Sungkonghoe University in Seoul in July 2001 and delivered lectures at a variety of academic institutions including New York University, Hofstra, Union College, Cornell University, and Sofia University (Tokyo).

John has been widely interviewed in print and on radio. He serves on the advisory committees of the Alliance of Scholars Concerned about Korea. He is a recipient of the Herbert W. Scoville fellowship and has been a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation. He currently lives with his partner Karin Lee in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_22_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, member of Veterans For Peace and former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses his personal reasons for supporting heroic whistleblower Bradley Manning; McGovern’s own experience with classified information during the Vietnam War (like Daniel Ellsberg, he regrets not exposing the government lies sooner and perhaps curtailing the war – saving countless lives in the process); why exceedingly few government employees that will sacrifice their careers to tell the truth, even with monumental consequences for maintaining the lie; the “Shooters walk free, whistleblower jailed” German television production on the WikiLeaks “Collateral Murder” video and Manning; and how WikiLeaks and Manning embarrassed the government and helped ignite the Arab Spring – but that doesn’t mean they have blood on their hands.

MP3 here. (36:05)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_21_wheeler.mp3]

Blogger Marcy Wheeler discusses the conviction of US citizen Tarek Mehanna on material support of terrorism charges, in part for posting “jihadist” videos online; the SCOTUS ruling (Holder v. HLP) that defines “material support” so broadly a lawyer could be arrested for representing alleged terrorist organizations (except those favored by the government, like MEK); whether provisions in the NDAA authorize the indefinite detention of Americans or not; the legal precedents set by the Yaser Hamdi, Jose Padilla and Anwar Al-Awlaki cases; and the ways presidents can avoid judicial review altogether – should a court ever get reacquainted with the Constitution and stop deferring to Executive power.

MP3 here. (19:17)

Blogger Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, grew up bi-coastally, starting with every town in New York with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, California, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal. Since then, she has lived in Western Massachusetts, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Ann Arbor, and — just recently — Western Michigan.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to Michigan; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton” — a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging. (Oh, and I hear Amazon still has the book for sale.)

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy met her husband Mr. emptywheel playing Ultimate Frisbee, though she retired from the sport several years ago. Marcy, Mr. EW and their dog — McCaffrey the MilleniaLab — live in a loft in a lovely urban hellhole.

Tom Engelhardt

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_21_engelhardt.mp3]

Tom Engelhardt, creator of Tomdispatch.com and author of The United States of Fear, discusses why the US withdrawal from Iraq seemed a lot like defeat, despite the “success” story peddled by Obama; how the ambitious Bush administration, confident of a “cakewalk” victory, never got the “enduring bases” and tens of thousands of permanent occupation soldiers they wanted; a catalog of what the US took home, and what remains behind; Dick Cheney’s reasonable explanation (in 1994) why George H.W. Bush was wise not to go all the way to Baghdad in the Gulf War; how the State Department has become a junior version of the DoD, more interested in war-making than diplomacy; and the militarized transformation of the US, in response to an al-Qaeda terrorist organization that (in its best days) could pull off an attack every few years.

MP3 here. (19:49)

Tom Engelhardt created and runs the Tomdispatch.com website, a project of The Nation Institute where he is a Fellow. He is the author of The American Way of War: How Bush’s Wars Became Obama’s, a highly praised history of American triumphalism in the Cold War, The End of Victory Culture, and of a novel, The Last Days of Publishing, as well as a collection of his Tomdispatch interviews, Mission Unaccomplished. Each spring he is a Teaching Fellow at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_20_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses his article “NATO vs. Syria;” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and the CIA working overtly and covertly to undermine the Assad regime; how the lack of reliable news from Syria makes it hard to tell if there really is a civil war or major uprising; the worse alternatives to secular Middle East dictators who at least tolerate religious minorities; the Syrian opposition’s receipt of “training” and weapons from Europe, Turkey and Libya; and how Obama wages war on the sly, using drones, covert operations and “rebel” proxy fighters on the ground.

MP3 here. (19:47)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_19_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “How Maliki and Iran Outsmarted the US on Troop Withdrawal;” the Iran-brokered deal that protected Moqtada al-Sadr’s militia, granted Prime Minister Maliki much-needed political support, and united Iraq’s power structure against US occupation; how the US screwed up plans for an Iraqi client state (you support the minority faction with a tenuous hold on power, not the majority that doesn’t need propping up); why an occupying mercenary army in Iraq is unworkable, so long as legal immunity is off the table; and how the religious divide in the Middle East will keep Shia Iran and Iraq closely aligned against Sunni Saudi Arabia.

MP3 here. (29:30)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_19_morrow.mp3]

IPS News journalist Adam Morrow discusses his article “Muslim Brotherhood Looks Beyond Tahrir;” the Islamic political parties sweeping Egypt’s parliamentary elections; continuing protests from Egyptian liberals, frustrated at getting trounced in the polls; the meeting with US Ambassador Anne Patterson, Senator John Kerry and the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party; and whether Egypt’s second-place – and very conservative – Islamic party will inspire more paranoid talk of a burgeoning Islamic caliphate, poised to conquer the world and convert your children.

MP3 here. (20:01)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Jack Hunter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_16_hunter.mp3]

Jack Hunter, talk radio host, Charleston newspaper columnist and Ron Paul 2012 blogger, discusses the Michele Bachmann/Ron Paul debate on Iran policy; why David Frum is (sort of) correct that Republicans live in an alternate reality quite apart from the real world; the consistency of pro-war pundits, from the Reagan era to today; why Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are both responsible for a million Iraqi deaths; and how a timely release of the 2011 National Intelligence Estimate could help avert war with Iran (like the 2007 version did).

MP3 here. (21:13)

Jack Hunter, a.k.a. the “Southern Avenger“, is a conservative commentator (WTMA 1250 AM talk radio) and columnist (Charleston City Paper) living in Charleston, South Carolina. Check out his YouTube channel.

Aaron Glantz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_16_glantz.mp3]

Aaron Glantz, Bay Citizen reporter and author of The War Comes Home: Washington’s Battle against America’s Veterans, discusses how the US quickly squandered the goodwill of Iraqis who were glad to be rid of Saddam Hussein; the disasters in Abu Ghraib, Fallujah and Najaf; a personal retrospective on the individual casualties of war; why the giant US embassy and small remaining mercenary force aren’t nearly enough to dominate Iraq; and why Obama deserves some credit for making good on Bush’s 2008 Status of Forces Agreement.

MP3 here. (19:57)

Aaron Glantz covers housing, the economy, and military issues for The Bay Citizen. Before joining TBC, Glantz spent seven years covering the war in Iraq and the treatment veterans receive when they come home. He is author of three books, most recently The War Comes Home: Washington’s Battle against America’s Veterans.

Karen Greenberg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_16_greenberg.mp3]

Karen Greenberg, Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University, discusses her article “How terrorist ‘entrapment’ ensnares us all;” setting a dangerous precedent by allowing law enforcement and paid informants to manufacture terrorist plots, ideology and materials; making the already-difficult entrapment legal defense even less likely to succeed; why terrorism suspects can’t expect to get fair trials; why preventive law enforcement is needed to some degree after 9/11; and how inter-agency rivalries (FBI-CIA) hinder open communication and may have allowed 9/11 to happen, but also prevent a unified police state from taking hold.

MP3 here. (30:04)

Karen J. Greenberg, a noted expert on national security, terrorism, and civil liberties, is Director of the Center on National Security. She is the author of The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo’s First 100 Days (Oxford University Press, 2009), which was selected as one of the best books of 2009 by The Washington Post and Slate.com. She is co-editor with Joshua L. Dratel of The Enemy Combatant Papers: American Justice, the Courts, and the War on Terror (Cambridge University Press, 2008) and The Torture Papers: The Road to Abu Ghraib (Cambridge University Press, 2005); editor of the books The Torture Debate in America (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and Al Qaeda Now (Cambridge University Press, 2005); and editor of the Terrorist Trial Report Card, 2001–2011. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Nation, The National Interest, Mother Jones, TomDispatch.com, and on major news channels. She is a permanent member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

 

Glenn Greenwald

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_15_greenwald.mp3]

Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald discusses his article “Obama to sign indefinite detention bill into law;” our return to the McCarthy era when indefinite detention was last codified in law; how the Levin/McCain bill just ties up legal loose ends to 10 years of official government policy previously justified by the AUMF; the broadened definition of terrorism, such that the president could target just about anyone; why we shouldn’t mistake Obama’s initial NDAA objections as a defense of liberty (he just doesn’t want Congress infringing on his near-dictatorial powers); why the progressive/liberal Left is not nearly as good on civil liberties now as during the Bush administration; the coalition of activists outside the mainstream who fight to preserve the Bill of Rights; and how the war on terror is increasingly focused on domestic issues, including this gem from Will Grigg.

MP3 here. (29:08)

Glenn Greenwald is a former Constitutional and civil rights litigator and is the author of two New York Times Bestselling books on the Bush administration’s executive power and foreign policy abuses. His just-released book, With Liberty and Justice for Some, is an indictment of America’s two-tiered system of justice, which vests political and financial elites with immunity even for egregious crimes while subjecting ordinary Americans to the world’s largest and most merciless penal state. Greenwald was named by The Atlantic as one of the 25 most influential political commentators in the nation. He is the recipient of the first annual I.F. Stone Award for Independent Journalism, and is the winner of the 2010 Online Journalism Association Award for his investigative work on the arrest and oppressive detention of Bradley Manning.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_14_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses how a cattle-trespass dispute between a North Dakota farmer and the local sheriff escalated into a “full spectrum military response,” including a Predator drone used for surveillance, and the arrest of the farmer, his wife, daughter and three sons; the greatly expanded scope and definition of domestic terrorism laws from the post-Oklahoma City AEDPA through 9/11 and the PATRIOT Act; why private citizens targeted by the government always seem to live in “compounds;” and the UAV lobby’s effort to get unmanned drones into police and sheriff departments around the country.

MP3 here. (19:50)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_14_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses Obama’s “mission accomplished” speech heralding the Iraq War’s “successful” end; a closer look at what nine years of US war and occupation has wrought (a million dead and a budding Maliki dictatorship); how an Iraqi strongman makes US imperial strategy easier; the brewing troubles in Pakistan; and why the Afghan National Police (ANP) is being expanded, despite a clear record of brutality and lawlessness.

MP3 here. (18:01)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_12_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses his article “Newt Gingrich: Demagogue, Pseudointellectual” about Gingrich’s assertion that Palestinians are an “invented” people (who therefore have no rights); the NY Times article that debunks Gingrich’s warnings on a doomsday EMP attack; the Republican primary candidates competing to be president of Israel’s fan club; and why Israel can be either a Jewish state or democratic – but not both.

MP3 here. (19:46)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_12_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses how big government, big business, militant nationalism and a belligerent foreign policy have given the US a “galloping” case of fascism; the real difference between Obama and Newt Gingrich (former owned by the banks, latter by big pharma); the public cheers and standing ovations for uniformed military going about their business; and the re-colonization of mineral and energy-rich Africa.

MP3 here. (20:03)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_12_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, internationally syndicated columnist and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj, discusses the conflict in Syria, where Western-backed instigators and a legitimate domestic opposition face off against the Assad regime – which still enjoys widespread popular support; the consequences of Syrian regime change for Palestinians, Iran and Hezbollah; how Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states are exporting homegrown Islamic radicals to fight in Syria (shades of 1980s Afghanistan – what could possibly go wrong?); what a truly democratic Middle East would look like; whether Egyptian sympathy for Palestinians will be tempered by continued US bribe money; and why the US needs to accept the Muslim Brotherhood as a legitimate political force – or deal with something far more radical later on.

MP3 here. (19:52)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_09_kpfk_giraldi.mp3]

In this interview, produced for KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles, Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi reprises and expands on his previous interview about his article “Washington’s Secret Wars,” Obama’s newly signed “findings” that authorize covert operations to destabilize the Iranian and Syrian governments, how the US and Israel use the Baluch Jundallah, Kurdish PJAK and MEK groups to commit terrorism-by-proxy, and the MEK’s energetic and well funded campaign to get de-listed as a terrorist group.

MP3 here. (29:13)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_09_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the Egyptian military leadership’s latest attempts at subverting the transition to civilian rule and constitutional reform; the soon-to-be reverse engineered US drone captured in Iran; why a new Libyan civil war may be coming soon; learning the wrong lessons from the Iraq War; and the hundreds of dead soldiers who received “honorable” burials in landfills, courtesy of the Air Force.

MP3 here. (19:46)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Kate Gould

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_09_gould.mp3]

Kate Gould, Legislative Associate for the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL), discusses her article “End of ‘Brown Rice Diplomacy’ with Iran?” that refers to the 45 total minutes spent in direct talks with Iran in the past 30 years; how Congress bill H.R. 1905 makes war more likely by outlawing diplomacy with any Iranian official who “presents a threat to the United States;” why there’s plenty of common ground for a uranium swap deal – if only the US would engage in meaningful talks and stop sabotaging the process; how the newest Iran sanctions hurt US relations with China and Europe; and why you should call your representative (1-877-429-0678) and tell him/her to oppose H.R. 1905.

MP3 here. (20:04)

Kate Gould is the Legislative Associate for Foreign Policy focused on Israel-Palestine, Iran, and other Middle East issues.

Kate began her career with FCNL as a program assistant, where she served in the foreign policy program from 2007-2009. Her lobbying work at FCNL inspired her to seek first-hand knowledge of the impact of U.S. policies by traveling and working in the Middle East for nine months.

Kate taught Palestinian schoolteachers for AMIDEAST, helped coordinate a joint Israeli-Palestinian radio show at the Israel-Palestine Center for Research and Information, and worked as a freelance journalist in the West Bank. In Gaza, she documented the impact of the blockade on civil society organizations in a report for the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv in conjunction with the Rebuilding Alliance, a U.S. NGO. Kate also interned for Senator Jeff Merkley both in southern Oregon and in his Washington, DC office.

Prior to re-joining FCNL’s foreign policy program, Kate served as the Director of Advocacy and Outreach for Just Foreign Policy.

Kate completed her undergraduate study of International Development and Political Science at Western Washington University and studied abroad in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Zanzibar/Tanzania.

William Astore

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_08_astore.mp3]

William Astore, Professor of History and author of Hindenburg: Icon of German Militarism, discusses his article “Fighting 1% Wars: Why Our Wars of Choice May Prove Fatal;” how willy-nilly US interventions discount the chaotic and unpredictable nature of warfare, virtually guaranteeing blowback; the young Americans who regularly play video war games yet remain ignorant of actual US wars (while military drone pilots, sitting in comfy chairs in front of computer screens, resemble gamers); and how the US military has transformed into a foreign legion, detached from legitimate national security concerns and the public they supposedly protect.

MP3 here. (20:08)

William J. Astore, a retired lieutenant colonel (USAF), is a TomDispatch regular. He has taught at the Air Force Academy and the Naval Postgraduate School, and now teaches History at the Pennsylvania College of Technology.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_07_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Research Editor at the Independent Institute, discusses his article “Seventy Years of Infamy” about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor; why WWII doesn’t deserve to be remembered as “the good war;” the birth of the military-industrial complex; how the war on terror is killing our constitution and civil liberties; and strategies for stopping future wars before they start.

MP3 here. (26:08)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor, San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_08_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses his article “Washington’s Secret Wars;” Obama’s newly signed “findings,” authorizing covert operations to destabilize the Iranian and Syrian governments; how the US and Israel use the Baluch Jundallah, Kurdish PJAK and MEK groups to commit terrorism-by-proxy; the MEK’s energetic and well funded campaign to get de-listed as a terrorist group (in order to more easily commit terrorist acts); and how the 1996 neoconservative policy document “A Clean Break: A New Strategy for Securing the Realm” is going according to plan.

MP3 here. (20:09)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

 

Robert Stinnett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_07_stinnett.mp3]

Robert Stinnett, author of Day of Deceit: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor, discusses how he found the McCollum memo – outlining the FDR administration’s eight step plan to provoke a Japanese attack – while searching through the National Archives; the radio “listening stations” that intercepted the Japanese fleet’s coded transmissions, earlier decrypted by the US; official orders from Naval command to stand aside and let the attack happen; and Stinnett’s new work-in-progress book, dealing in part with whether Admiral Kimmel’s was complicit or framed-up.

MP3 here. (21:10)

Robert Stinnett is a Media Fellow at The Independent Institute in Oakland, California, and author of George Bush: The War Years and Day of Deceit: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor. See the Independent Institute’s Pearl Harbor resources page here.

David Codrea

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_08_codrea.mp3]

David Codrea, columnist and gun rights advocate, discusses the “Fast and Furious” scandal implicating several government departments in helping gunrunners buy guns in the US and transport them to Mexico (apparently in order to boost statistics on illegal gun use, in order to justify more restrictive domestic gun laws); the Clean Up ATF website, put together by fed-up whistleblowers, that helped break the story; why a special prosecutor is needed to stop the Obama administration’s coverup and start indictments; the ongoing Congressional hearings; and why Attorney General Eric Holder is probably guilty of obstructing justice and perjury (and certainly is unfit to perform his job duties).

MP3 here. (20:02)

David Codrea is a long-time gun rights advocate who defiantly challenges the folly of citizen disarmament. He is a field editor for GUNS Magazine, and a blogger at The War on Guns: Notes from the Resistance.

M.J. Rosenberg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_05_rosenberg.mp3]

M.J. Rosenberg, journalist and Senior Foreign Policy Fellow at Media Matters Action Network, discusses his article “American Enterprise Institute Admits: Iran Threat Isn’t That It Will Launch Nuclear Attack;” why the neoconservatives fear Iran getting a nuclear weapon and then not using it, dispelling the “crazy Ayatollah” image carefully created by Iran-hawks; how a nuclear-armed Iran would disrupt the “balance of power,” so the US and Israel could no longer wage undeclared war with impunity; the new round of “crippling” Iran sanctions, which would end conventional trade and create nation-wide black markets; and why Israelis keen on attacking Iran should expect retaliation from Hezbollah’s large arsenal of missiles in Lebanon.

MP3 here. (19:44)

M.J. Rosenberg is Senior Foreign Policy Fellow at Media Matters Action Network. Previously, he worked on Capitol Hill for various Democratic members of the House and Senate for 15 years. He was also a Clinton political appointee at USAID. In the early 1980s, he was editor of AIPACs weekly newsletter Near East Report. From 1998-2009, he was director of policy at Israel Policy Forum.

Michael Klare

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_06_klare.mp3]

Michael Klare, professor and author of Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet, discusses his article “Playing With Fire: Obama’s Risky Oil Threat to China;” why the geopolitical struggle for oil resources is more about leveraging power and influence than economic exploitation; changing the US foreign policy focus from the Middle East to Asia and the Pacific; China’s increasing dependence on Middle East and African energy resources; and how a US naval incursion in China’s coastal waters is akin to a Chinese fleet dropping anchor in the Gulf of Mexico.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Michael T. Klare is a professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College, a TomDispatch regular, and the author, most recently, of Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet. A documentary movie version of his previous book, Blood and Oil, is available from the Media Education Foundation.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_05_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses Obama’s inadequate “condolences” for the US attack on two Pakistani border posts that killed 25 soldiers; how the rising anger of Pakistanis is forcing their military to finally stop kowtowing to the Pentagon; why the US seems intent on provoking a crisis, even though crucial supply lines to Afghanistan are being cut off as a result; and why you need to talk to lower ranking US military officers to get the true story on Afghanistan.

MP3 here. (19:51)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_02_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the provisions within the National Defense Authorization Act allowing Americans to be detained by the military indefinitely, without trial; how democratic societies are destroyed by supposedly temporary or emergency “exceptions” to the rule of law; Congress’s tough-guy push for a militarized criminal justice system, even though the military opposes the idea and existing federal courts are perfectly capable of handling the work load; how the Bush administration successfully used civilian courts to prosecute and convict terrorists; and how DC Circuit Courts have neutered SCOTUS rulings on habeas corpus protections.

MP3 here. (22:16)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_02_escobar.mp3]

Globetrotting journalist Pepe Escobar discusses his article “The shadow war in Syria;” how Turkey is helping NATO and GCC foment a Syrian civil war; why the Muslim Brotherhood is best situated to replace the Assad regime, not the Syrian exiles favored by the US and Europe; Jordan’s susceptibility to an Arab spring revolution (not that King Abdullah II would mind much – he’d rather be in NY City); how the US and NATO are provoking a new Cold War with Russia; and the US backup plan for world domination, should the 1000+ foreign military bases become untenable in future.

MP3 here. (40:22)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

An extreme traveler, Pepe’s nose for news has taken him to all parts of the globe. He was in Afghanistan and interviewed the military leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Masoud, a couple of weeks before his assassination. Two weeks before September 11, 2001, while Pepe was in the tribal areas of Pakistan, Asia Times Online published his prophetic piece, “Get Osama! Now! Or else …” Pepe was one of the first journalists to reach Kabul after the Taliban’s retreat, and more recently he has explored and reported from Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, US and China.

 

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_02_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the connection between “crippling” new Iran sanctions and the storming of the British embassy in Tehran; comments from Ehud Barak and Meir Dagan that indicate Israel is backing away from war with Iran; the new WikiLeaks spy files that expose the “surveillance-industrial complex;” and how Nigeria’s Boko Haram became an official “emerging threat to the U.S. Homeland.”

MP3 here. (22:16)

John Glaser is Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com. He is a former intern at The American Conservative magazine and CATO Institute.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_12_01_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses his article “Dying to Corrupt Afghanistan;” Hamid Karzai’s empty promises of reform as Afghanistan claims the title of most corrupt government in the world; Mitt Romney’s eager prostrating to the military in a time when “support the troops” has exempted the whole institution from public reproach; and why it’s no coincidence every country the US is about to go to war with has a (supposedly) crazy ruler who can’t be negotiated with.

MP3 here. (20:01)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

Trevor Timm

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_30_timm.mp3]

Trevor Timm, Activist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, discusses his article “Cablegate One Year Later: How WikiLeaks Has Influenced Foreign Policy, Journalism, and the First Amendment;” how the WikiLeaks revelation of an Iraqi family’s massacre by US soldiers (and the attempted coverup with an airstrike) hastened the end of the war; why WikiLeaks deserves some credit for the Arab Spring, especially in Tunisia; who is and who isn’t bound by government classified documents; and the grand jury convened to indict WikiLeaks and Julian Assange for somehow violating the Espionage Act of 1917.

MP3 here. (20:00)

Trevor Timm is an Activist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. He specializes in free speech issues and government transparency. Before joining the EFF, Trevor helped the longtime General Counsel of The New York Times, James Goodale, write a book on the First Amendment. He has also worked for the former President of the ACLU and at The New Yorker. He graduated from Northeastern University and has a J.D. from New York Law School.

Trevor also curates the Twitter account @WLLegal that reports on legal news surrounding WikiLeaks, the right to publish classified information, and other freedom of the press issues.

Jeb Sprague

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_29_sprague.mp3]

Jeb Sprague, author of Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracy in Haiti, discusses his article “WikiLeaks Reveal: U.S. and UN Officials Oversaw Integration of Ex-Army Paramilitaries into Haiti’s Police Force;” a brief overview of Haiti’s history, from colonial slave state to current times; Aristide’s democratic election following “Papa Doc” and “Baby Doc” Duvalier dictatorships; and how international aid agencies have destroyed Haiti’s domestic rice production and spread cholera.

MP3 here. (29:23)

Jeb Sprague is a blogger and PhD candidate in sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracy in Haiti.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_30_morrow.mp3]

IPS News journalist Adam Morrow discusses the early parliamentary voting results in Egypt, with the Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamist parties dominating so far; why the leftist/liberal parties fear a new Egyptian dictatorship will take hold; the unpopular supra-constitutional principles that permanently subordinate civilian government to the military; why Egypt’s revolution seems to have been anticipated and manipulated by the military council; and why you shouldn’t believe anything the US State Department says in public (the WikiLeaks cables are another matter).

MP3 here. (20:09)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_30_wheeler.mp3]

Blogger Marcy Wheeler discusses the McCain-Levin and Udall amendments to the Defense Authorization Act; how the Supreme Court allowed American citizens to be labeled “enemy combatants” and subject to indefinite detention by the Hamdi decision in 2004; why a more restrictive – or revoked – Iraq War AUMF (as proposed by Rand Paul) would more effectively protect citizens than the Udall amendment; why “enhanced interrogation” may be making a (legalized) comeback; and the Obama administration’s opposition to language in the Act that limits Executive power and “flexibility.”

MP3 here. (18:57)

Blogger Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, grew up bi-coastally, starting with every town in New York with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, California, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal. Since then, she has lived in Western Massachusetts, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Ann Arbor, and — just recently — Western Michigan.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to Michigan; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton” — a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging. (Oh, and I hear Amazon still has the book for sale.)

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy met her husband Mr. emptywheel playing Ultimate Frisbee, though she retired from the sport several years ago. Marcy, Mr. EW and their dog — McCaffrey the MilleniaLab — live in a loft in a lovely urban hellhole.

Jeff Paterson

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_29_paterson.mp3]

Jeff Paterson, Project Director of Courage to Resist, discusses whistleblower Bradley Manning’s December 16th court hearing, his first after a year and a half long pretrial detention; Manning’s lawyer’s complaints about the government’s refusal to disclose evidence; the life-sentence facing Manning for allegedly leaking information embarrassing – but not harmful – to the government and military; how Manning’s treatment at the Quantico Marine brig clearly violated the UCMJ; and how you can donate to Manning’s legal defense and/or participate in a demonstration supporting him at Fort Meade on December 16th and 17th.

MP3 here. (20:00)

Jeff Paterson is Project Director of Courage to Resist.