Scott Horton Interviews Andy Worthington

Scott Horton, March 03, 2012

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Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses his efforts to get the last two Kuwaiti prisoners released from Guantanamo; why no prisoners have left Gitmo in 14 months (except in body-bags), even though over half have been cleared for release; losing hearts and minds with arbitrary detentions and lack of habeas rights at Bagram prison in Afghanistan; and how the Bush administration’s above-the-law attitude has prevailed and “normalized” under Obama.

MP3 here. (18:12)

Andy Worthington writes regularly for newspapers and websites including the Guardian, Truthout, Cageprisoners, and the Future of Freedom Foundation. He writes occasionally for the Daily Star, Lebanon, the Huffington Post, Antiwar.com, CounterPunch, AlterNet, and ZNet. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

5 Responses to “Andy Worthington”

  1. Submission to authority

    In the grand scheme of things, Guantanamo serves the same purpose as our dysfunctional medical industry, the anxiety of having a $15 trillion National Debt, wars that keep our sons and grandsons in harm’s way, drug addiction and militarization of police force brutality. Surely, it is to keep we the public apprehensive, anxiety driven, insecure and in fearful submission to authority.

  2. well, they generated so much irrational fear in order to prosecute their stupid self-defeating foreign policy that they found they had no place in america where it was politically even possible to put these people. Easier to find a site for nuclear waste, dumb as THAT is. I don't this is about gathering power as much as it's about being indebted to a power (fear) you can no longer control.

  3. I live in Kuwait, and although I don't know anything about these two prisoners, I do know that it was perfectly normal for Kuwaitis to go to Afghanistan at that time doing charity work. Whatever else one can say about Kuwaitis, they're known for being very generous when it comes to charity (and charity is one of the five pillars of Islam – a certain amount that's absolutely required, but people are encouraged to give much more voluntarily) , and Afghanistan is a Muslim country that was – and is – one of the poorest. Now, for example, people have been collecting money and supplies for the Syrian people, and it's delivered personally.

  4. umma, how do you handle poor in your ‘rich’ country?
    Charity is ‘voluntary’ but one of 5 ‘pillars of Islam’.
    Its like saying you MUST give voluntarily!
    By the way, are you one of Iraninan origin majority or Arabian minority?
    Of course now I would like those ex-agancy fellows to come forward and say that Kuwait is not a real country!!
    Afghans don’t need your charity! There things about Afghanistan that you could not even imagin!
    When you where burying your firstborn female alive they where carving giant Buddha statues in the mountains which gave americans the idea of mount rushmore!
    You should study a lot more, and I’m not talking about univer-city e-duck-ation.
    So please stop your charity to Syrians they don’t need you literaryly bloddy money. And read Khalil Gibran wrote about giving!!

  5. [...] The interview is here, but in the end Scott and I spent most of our 18-minute interview discussing my visit to Kuwait, and also the detention situation in Afghanistan. I was very glad that Scott had asked me about my visit to Kuwait, as it had been such a great insight into the background of the two remaining Kuwaiti prisoners, Fayiz al-Kandari and Fawzi al-Odah, and the context of their capture. [...]

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