Carl Finamore

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_23_finamore.mp3]

Carl Finamore, Machinist Local Lodge 1781 delegate to the San Francisco Labor Council, AFL-CIO, discusses his article “Military Orchestrates Egypt’s Presidential Elections;” how Tahrir Square protesters won free speech and labor reforms, but failed to change the military-dominated political system; how the West uses Islamic groups to counter secular nationalism in the Arab world; the US’s strategic interests in Egypt; and why Egyptians, fatigued from lengthy protests, are increasingly more concerned with the economy than politics.

MP3 here. (27:37)

Carl Finamore is Machinist Local Lodge 1781 delegate to the San Francisco Labor Council, AFL-CIO. He was in Cairo only hours after Mubarak was deposed and visited again a few months ago for the one year anniversary. He can be reached at local1781@yahoo.com and his writings viewed on his website.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_24_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy, discusses his article “Was Afghan Massacre Linked to IED Attack;” the confusing events and timeline during Sgt. Robert Bales’s alleged massacre; the Special Forces assassination raid that took place in the same village, on the same night, as the massacre; and how the US military uses collective punishment (a war crime) on civilians suspected of aiding the insurgency.

MP3 here. (19:02)

Gareth Porter is an investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy. The paperback edition of his latest book, Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam, was published in 2006.

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_23_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses his article “On Israel’s ‘Right to Exist;'” the libertarian perspective on the rights of individuals and states; how Israel’s “right” is used as rhetorical misdirection, changing the subject away from the plight of Palestinians; defining Israel as “the state of the Jewish people” irrespective of location (since all Jews have the right of return); why the “end of Israel,” as defined, does not mean Jews will be pushed into the sea, but that all the people will have equal rights under the law; and why the goal of hardcore Zionists is ethnic cleansing, not apartheid.

MP3 here. (18:30)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_23_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy, discusses his article “US Charity Secretly Funds Israeli Nukes;” how the Weizmann Institute, posing as a non-profit charity, conducts espionage and fundraising for Israel’s nuclear weapons program; why the US government continues pretending that Israel’s nukes don’t exist; the IRS’s tentative ruling on tax-deductible donations to the Weizmann Institute; how the Justice Department’s secretive “shutdown” orders on productive FBI investigations violates US obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty; and why the mainstream media won’t touch this stuff with a ten foot pole.

MP3 here. (19:56)

Grant F. Smith is the author of the book Divert! NUMEC, Zalman Shapiro and the diversion of U.S. weapons-grade uranium into the Israeli nuclear weapons program. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Robert P. Murphy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_22_murphy.mp3]

Robert P. Murphy, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, discusses his article “Who Needs War for Oil;” why the US military doesn’t need to intervene in the Middle East to “secure” supplies of oil; how embargoes hurt oil exporting countries more than their customers (shown by the US-supported embargo on Iran); and the contrarian theory that oil scarcity and higher prices are the true US policy goals.

MP3 here. (20:13)

Robert P. Murphy is an adjunct scholar of the Mises Institute, where he teaches at the Mises Academy. He runs the blog Free Advice and is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal, and his newest book, Lessons for the Young Economist.

Flynt Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_24_leverett.mp3]

Flynt Leverett, former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, discusses the latest negotiations on Iran’s nuclear enrichment program at the just-concluded P5+1 Baghdad summit; why the US will never agree to lift sanctions on Iran, no matter the concessions; how the US negotiating position makes Obama look like an idiot; Richard Nixon’s observation that the same political price is paid for going half way as all the way – so you might as well go to China; why the Obama administration still won’t (consistently) acknowledge Iran’s rational leadership and sovereign (and NPT) right to enrich uranium; and how bad-faith negotiating by the US ruined the “reciprocity framework” established in the previous Istanbul talks.

MP3 here. (18:35)

Flynt Leverett runs The Race For Iran blog and teaches at Pennsylvania State University’s School of International Affairs. Additionally, he directs the Iran Project at the New America Foundation, where he is a Senior Research Fellow.

Dr. Leverett is a leading authority on the Middle East and Persian Gulf, U.S. foreign policy, and global energy affairs. From 1992 to 2003, he had a distinguished career in the U.S. government, serving as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a CIA Senior Analyst. He left the George W. Bush Administration and government service in 2003 because of disagreements about Middle East policy and the conduct of the war on terror.

Dr. Leverett’s 2006 monograph, Dealing With Tehran: Assessing U.S. Diplomatic Options Toward Iran, presented the seminal argument for a U.S.-Iranian “grand bargain”, an idea that he has developed in multiple articles and Op Eds in The New York Times, The National Interest, POLITICO, Salon, Washington Monthly, and the New America Foundation’s “Big Ideas for a New America” series.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_22_mcgovern.mp3]

Former CIA senior analyst Ray McGovern discusses his article “Applying the Six-Day War to Iran;” neoconservative Charles Krauthammer’s revisionist history on the war – recounting it as a pre-emptive strike against imminent Arab attack instead of a long-planned land grab; former Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin’s candid honesty about Israel’s “war of choice” in 1967; disagreement among Israeli government officials on whether or not Iran poses an existential threat; and how President Obama’s timid negotiating style has complicated his effort to dissuade Netanyahu from attacking Iran.

MP3 here. (20:02)

Ray McGovern works with Tell the Word, the publishing arm of the ecumenical Church of the Saviour in inner-city Washington. In the Sixties he served as an infantry/intelligence officer and then became a CIA analyst for the next 27 years. He is on the Steering Group of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS).

Chris Hellman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_22_hellman.mp3]

Chris Hellman, Senior Research Analyst for the National Priorities Project, discusses his article “How Much Does Washington Spend on ‘Defense;'” the GOP’s plan to cut the “meals on wheels” program instead of the Pentagon’s budget; how constant threat-hyping makes Americans believe Iran is more threatening than the Soviet Union in its heyday; how outsourcing failed to reduce the size and cost of government; and why a few budget items should be higher, like nuclear waste storage.

MP3 here. (26:31)

Chris Hellman is Senior Research Analyst for the National Priorities Project.

Chris joined NPP after serving as a military policy analyst for the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation where his work focused on national security spending, military planning and policy, base closures, major weapons systems, trends in the defense industry, global military spending, and homeland security. Prior to joining the Center, Chris spent six years as a Senior Research Analyst at the Center for Defense Information. He also worked for two years as a military budget specialist at Physicians for Social Responsibility. Previously, Chris spent ten years on Capitol Hill as a congressional staffer working on national security and foreign policy issues. He is a frequent media commentator on military planning, policy, and budgetary issues and is the author of numerous reports and articles. He holds a Bachelors Degree from Middlebury College in Vermont.

Glenn Greenwald

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_21_greenwald.mp3]

Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald discusses federal judge Katherine Forrest’s amazing ruling against the 2011 National Defense Authorization Act; why the US is moving rapidly toward an authoritarian police state 10+ years after 9/11; how the PATRIOT Act and military commissions, both highly controversial in 2001, have become the new normal; the Justice Department’s refusal to say that journalists and activists aren’t subject to indefinite detention – even though the DOJ would have won in court by doing so; how the NDAA violates the 1st and 5th Amendments; the Congress’s assault on due-process; and how the mainstream media avoids debate on inconvenient subjects by simply ignoring them.

MP3 here. (22:11)

Glenn Greenwald is a former Constitutional and civil rights litigator and is the author of two New York Times Bestselling books on the Bush administration’s executive power and foreign policy abuses. His just-released book, With Liberty and Justice for Some, is an indictment of America’s two-tiered system of justice, which vests political and financial elites with immunity even for egregious crimes while subjecting ordinary Americans to the world’s largest and most merciless penal state. Greenwald was named by The Atlantic as one of the 25 most influential political commentators in the nation. He is the recipient of the first annual I.F. Stone Award for Independent Journalism, and is the winner of the 2010 Online Journalism Association Award for his investigative work on the arrest and oppressive detention of Bradley Manning.

Dina Rasor

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_21_rasor.mp3]

Dina Rasor, founder of the Project on Military Procurement (now called the Project on Government Oversight, or POGO), discusses her article “Pilots as Lab Rats: The Reprehensible Risk-Taking on the F-22 Raptor;” the pilots who refused to fly anymore and went to 60 Minutes about the Raptor’s unexplained toxicity; how so-called stealth aircraft can be detected with outdated radar technology; the nearly half billion-dollar Raptor’s onerous maintenance requirements whenever it’s flown in the rain; and why pilot training is the key to an effective air force, not a fleet of expensive new planes.

MP3 here. (19:43)

Dina Rasor is an investigator, journalist and author. She has been fighting waste while working for transparency and accountability in government for three decades. In 1981 she founded the Project on Military Procurement (now called the Project on Government Oversight, or POGO) to serve as a non-profit, non-partisan watchdog over military and related government spending.

Rasor’s most recent book, Betraying Our Troops: The Destructive Results of Privatizing War, chronicles first-hand accounts of the devastating consequences of privatized war support for troops and the overall war effort in Iraq. She also founded the Bauman & Rasor Group that helps whistleblowers file lawsuits under the Federal qui tam False Claims act and has been involved in cases which have returned over $100 million back to the U.S. Treasury.

Steve Horn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_21_horn.mp3]

Steve Horn, researcher and writer at DeSmogBlog, discusses the Chicago NATO Summit activists arrested and charged with conspiracy to commit terrorism and providing material support for terrorism; the two informants who infiltrated the group and possibly planted or invented evidence; the home-brew kit Chicago police apparently “mistook” for a Molotov cocktail-maker; the activists held in solitary confinement and held without charge for days; why the cops and feds are so afraid of the Occupy Movement; and why Wall Street banks are hiring private security.

MP3 here. (25:13)

Steve Horn is a Research Fellow for DeSmogBlog. He joined the DeSmogBlog team in September 2011. Steve previously was a reporter and researcher at the Center for Media and Democracy, interned in Washington, DC with former U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold (D-WI), and interned at the Rotary International world headquarters in Evanston, Illinois. In his free time, Steve is a competitive runner, with a personal best time of 2:43:04 in the 2009 Boston Marathon.

A graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, majoring in political science and legal studies, his writing has appeared on AlterNet, PR Watch, The Nation, Truth-Out, FireDogLake, Common Dreams, Mondoweiss, Uganda’s Daily Monitor, Modern Ghana, the London Evening Post, and CleanTechnica.

Christopher Anders

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_18_anders.mp3]

Christopher Anders, senior legislative counsel in the ACLU’s Washington Legislative Office, discusses the temporary legal injunction prohibiting enforcement of some provisions in the NDAA, specifically the indefinite military detentions that could apply to American dissidents like Noam Chomsky and Daniel Ellsberg; the vague definitions of “support for terrorism” and “associated forces,” which basically mean whatever the government wants them to; why most members of Congress are willing to destroy civil liberties to look tough on terrorism and win reelection; imagining the consequences if other countries dared to assassinate Americans based on secret evidence and an undisclosed legal standard; and the US’s hypocritical message to the developing world about the superiority of civilian trials to military ones.

MP3 here. (16:45)

Christopher E. Anders is the senior legislative counsel in the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington Legislative Office. He represents the ACLU in lobbying Congress and the executive branch on lesbian and gay rights, the faith-based initiative, conflicts between religious claims and civil rights, fair housing, oversight of federal civil rights enforcement, restoration of civil rights protections eroded by the courts, hate crimes and HIV/AIDS issues.

Neve Gordon

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_18_gordon.mp3]

Neve Gordon, Israeli activist and author of Israel’s Occupation, discusses his article “Erasing the Nakba: Israel’s Tireless Efforts to Conceal the Historical Events Leading to Its Creation;” how the state propagates its own version of history through public education, popular culture and compliant media; why the “land without a people” myth of Israel’s founding is less convincing than ever; how 500,000 Israeli settlers have – by design – made a two-state solution all but impossible; and why a single, power-sharing, bi-national state is the last avenue to Israeli-Palestinian peace.

MP3 here. (22:36)

Neve Gordon is an Israeli activist and the author of Israel’s Occupation. His website is IsraelsOccupation.info.

Kevjn Lim

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_18_lim.mp3]

Kevjn Lim, independent writer and humanitarian professional, discusses his article “Israel’s Reluctant Friend;” the alleged high-level leak within the US government that supposedly exposed Azerbaijan’s offer of airstrips for an Israeli attack on Iran; Azerbaijan’s uncertain motivation for doing such a thing – if it’s true – since it has no real enmity with neighboring Iran and would face serious military consequences; and how Azerbaijan shares Turkey’s role as a bridge between the Muslim world and the West.

MP3 here. (16:34)

Kevjn Lim is an independent writer and humanitarian professional. He is also a contributing analyst at Open Briefing: The Civil Society Intelligence Agency. From 2007-2011, he served as delegate with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in the Palestinian Territories, Darfur, Iraq, Ghaddhafi’s Libya and Afghanistan, specializing in protection and analysis. Prior to that, he taught modern languages at both Trinity and Queens’ Colleges, University of Melbourne (2004-2006), and served as intelligence officer with the Singapore Armed Forces (2001-2004).

Kevjn holds a BA Honours (First Class) in political science and Jewish-Islamic studies from the University of Melbourne, and submitted his thesis on Israeli politics (co-supervised by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem). His work has appeared in a number of publications including Israel Affairs, Jerusalem Post, The Diplomat, openDemocracy and Asia Times Online. Besides English, he is fluent in Arabic, French, Hebrew, Italian, Mandarin Chinese, Persian, Romanian and Spanish.

Born and raised in Singapore, he is currently based in the Middle East.

Ramzy Baroud

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_17_baroud.mp3]

Ramzy Baroud, author of My Father Was a Freedom Fighter: Gaza’s Untold Story, discusses his article “East Africa at the Brink;” the multidimensional conflict in Sudan/South Sudan and neighboring countries; newly independent South Sudan’s devastating loss of oil income – which is the war and famine-wracked country’s entire economy; how US foreign policy disasters (like the Libyan War) create regional instability that justifies further interventions; why US interests are more geared toward disrupting China’s robust trade in Africa than controlling natural resources; and why a real Palestinian peace process will come from US pressure and Arab Spring momentum, not from the goodwill of Israel’s government.

MP3 here. (23:23)

Ramzy Baroud is an author and editor of The Palestine Chronicle. His work has been published in many newspapers, journals and anthologies around the world. His books include The Second Palestinian Intifada: A Chronicle of a People’s Struggle and Searching Jenin: Eyewitness Accounts of the Israeli Invasion.

Doug Bandow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_17_bandow.mp3]

Doug Bandow, senior fellow at the Cato Institute, discusses his article “Mitt Romney: The Foreign Policy of Know-Nothingism;” the easier time Republicans have with diplomatic overtures since they don’t have to defend against “weakness” like Democrats; why you can’t be an Obama fan and morally principled; Glenn Greenwald’s lonely voice of dissent on the progressive Left; Romney’s empty sloganeering, like achieving “victory” in Afghanistan; and why Benjamin Netanyahu would be a de facto cabinet member in a Romney administration.

MP3 here. (20:01)

Doug Bandow is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, specializing in foreign policy and civil liberties. He worked as special assistant to President Reagan and editor of the political magazine Inquiry. He writes regularly for leading publications such as Fortune magazine, National Interest, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Times. Bandow speaks frequently at academic conferences, on college campuses, and to business groups. Bandow has been a regular commentator on ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox News Channel, and MSNBC. He holds a J.D. from Stanford University.

John Feffer

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_17_feffer.mp3]

John Feffer, co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies, discusses the China-Phillipines fight over natural resources in the South China Sea; how China weakened its international legal position by signing the UN Law of the Sea treaty, ceding historical territorial claims to a new “exclusive economic zone” standard; US interest in protecting shipping lanes, especially for oil tankers; how collective security agreements seem like a good idea – until a world war breaks out over a minor squabble; and planning Pentagon and defense contractor make-work projects (before big budget cuts come due) in a new “Pacific Pivot” policy.

MP3 here. (18:55)

John Feffer is co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies and author of Crusade 2.0: The West’s Resurgent War on Islam. His webpage is JohnFeffer.com.

John has been a Writing Fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC and a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University. He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia. He has taught a graduate level course on international conflict at Sungkonghoe University in Seoul in July 2001 and delivered lectures at a variety of academic institutions including New York University, Hofstra, Union College, Cornell University, and Sofia University (Tokyo).

John has been widely interviewed in print and on radio. He serves on the advisory committees of the Alliance of Scholars Concerned about Korea. He is a recipient of the Herbert W. Scoville fellowship and has been a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation. He currently lives with his partner Karin Lee in Hyattsville, Maryland.

Noam Sheizaf

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_15_sheizaf.mp3]

Noam Sheizaf, journalist at 972mag.com and keeper of the Promised Land blog, discusses Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s super-coalition government – the strongest since Israel’s founding; why Israel’s settler movement has nothing to fear from current political conditions in Israel and the US; how Israel’s citizens have lost interest in the West Bank occupation, much like Americans who couldn’t care less about Afghanistan; and why the occupation of Palestinian lands is best described as a joint Israel-US project.

MP3 here. (11:04)

Noam Sheizaf is an independent journalist and editor. He worked for Ha-ir local paper in Tel Aviv, for Ynet.co.il and for Maariv daily paper, where his last post was as a deputy editor of the weekend magazine. His articles have been published at Haaretz, Yedioth Ahronoth, The Nation and other papers and magazines.

Before working as a journalist, Noam served four and a half years in the IDF. He lives and works in Tel Aviv.

Reza Marashi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_15_marashi.mp3]

Reza Marashi, Research Director for the National Iranian American Council, discusses the Wall Street Journal’s announcement that the MEK will soon shed its “terrorist group” status in the US; the State Department’s de-listing evaluation process, which requires that the MEK publicly renounce violence and disarm; how the Bush Administration used Saddam Hussein’s hosting of terrorist groups, especially the MEK, to justify the Iraq War in 2003; the foreign and domestic opponents to friendly US-Iran relations; and how business interests can open borders even when political forces conspire to close them.

MP3 here. (23:16)

Reza Marashi joined NIAC in 2010 as the organization’s first Research Director. He came to NIAC after four years in the Office of Iranian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. Prior to his tenure at the State Department, he was an analyst at the Institute for National Strategic Studies (INSS) covering China-Middle East issues, and a Tehran-based private strategic consultant on Iranian political and economic risk. Marashi is frequently consulted by Western governments on Iran-related matters. His articles have appeared in The Atlantic, Foreign Policy, The National Interest, Tehran Bureau, the Huffington Post, Salon, Asharq Alawsat, the Daily Caller, and the Cairo Review of Global Affairs. He has been a guest contributor to the BBC, NPR, Financial Times, Reuters, Al Jazeera, ABC News, CBC News, Macleans, Fox News, The Daily Star and The National.

 

Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_15_vlahos.mp3]

Kelley B. Vlahos, featured Antiwar.com columnist and contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine, discusses retired General Stanley McChrystal’s generous retirement package, lucrative speaking fees, and new “teaching” position at Yale University; the celebrity status of retired military and government officials, even when they are notorious for torture, coverups, and being fired for insubordination; the missing-in-action campus antiwar movements in “liberal” American universities; and how military women rape victims are punished for reporting the crime, often discharged with “personality disorders” and stripped of health care and retirement benefits.

MP3 here. (27:47)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos has spent over a decade as a political reporter in Washington DC. Currently, she is a contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine and its daily weblog, @TAC. She is also a Washington correspondent for the DC-based homeland security magazine, Homeland Security Today, a long-time political writer for FOXNews.com, a regular columnist for Antiwar.com and a contributor to CriminalJustice.Change.org

Francis Boyle

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_14_boyle.mp3]

Francis A. Boyle, Professor at the University of Illinois College of Law, discusses the conviction of former President Bush, Dick Cheney and six members of the administration for war crimes (in absentia, in a Malaysian court); why the “torture memos,” concocted by John Yoo and Jay Bybee, amount to criminal conspiracy and can’t be excused as legal counsel; the Ninth Circuit Court’s questionable rejection of Jose Padilla’s torture suit against Yoo; evidence that the Obama administration hasn’t closed the secret prisons or stopped torture; and Boyle’s pending case in the International Criminal Court against the Bush administration’s primary actors.

MP3 here. (24:17)

Francis Boyle is a Professor and scholar in the areas of international law and human rights. He is the author of Tackling America’s Toughest Questions: Alternative Media InterviewsPalestine, Palestinians and International Law, and other publications.

Professor Boyle received a J.D. degree magna cum laude and A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Harvard University. Prior to joining the faculty at the College of Law, he was a teaching fellow at Harvard and an associate at its Center for International Affairs. He also practiced tax and international tax with Bingham, Dana & Gould in Boston.

He has written and lectured extensively in the United States and abroad on the relationship between international law and politics. His Protesting Power: War, Resistance and Law (Rowman & Littlefield Inc. 2007) has been used successfully in anti-war protest trials. In the September 2000 issue of the prestigious The International History Review, Professor Boyle’s Foundations of World Order: The Legalist Approach to International Relations (1898-1922) was proclaimed as “a major contribution to this reinterrogation of the past” and “required reading for historians, political scientists, international relations specialists, and policy-makers.” That book was translated into Korean and published in Korea in 2003 by Pakyoungsa Press.

As an internationally recognized expert, Professor Boyle serves as counsel to  Bosnia and Herzegovina and to the Provisional Government of the State of Palestine. He also represents two associations of citizens within Bosnia and has been instrumental in developing the indictment against Slobodan Milosevic for committing genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Professor Boyle is Attorney of Record for the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria, conducting its legal affairs on a worldwide basis. Over his career, he has represented national and international bodies including the Blackfoot Nation (Canada), the Nation of Hawaii, and the Lakota Nation, as well as numerous individual death penalty and human rights cases. He has advised numerous international bodies in the areas of human rights, war crimes and genocide, nuclear policy, and bio-warfare.

From 1991-92, Professor Boyle served as Legal Advisor to the Palestinian Delegation to the Middle East Peace Negotiations. He also has served on the Board of Directors of Amnesty International, as well as  a consultant to the American Friends Services Committee, and on the Advisory Board for the Council for Responsible Genetics. He drafted the U.S. domestic implementing legislation for the Biological Weapons Convention, known as the Biological Weapons Anti-Terrorism Act of 1989, that was approved unanimously by both Houses of the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President George H.W. Bush. That story is told in his book Biowarfare and Terrorism (Clarity Press: 2005).

In 2001 he was selected to be the Dr. Irma M. Parhad Lecturer by the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Calgary in Canada. In 2007 he became the Bertrand Russell Peace Lecturer at McMaster University in Canada. Professor Boyle is listed in the current edition of  Marquis’ Who’s Who in America.

Currently Professor Boyle lectures on international law at the University of Illinois College of Law.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_14_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses his article “Yoo, Latif, and the Rise of Secret Justice;” the Ninth Circuit Court’s legally indefensible ruling that John Yoo is immune to Jose Padilla’s torture lawsuit because, at the time, torture was a confused legal issue; “torture memo” co-author Jay Bybee’s convenient new gig as a Ninth Circuit Court judge; why Italian prosecutors wish John Yoo would resume vacationing in Italy; the DC Circuit Court’s steadfast belief in secret and self-contradicting government evidence against ten-year Guantanamo inmate Adnan Latif; and how Republican judges are making radical changes in the rule of law to get their buddies off the hook.

MP3 here. (21:08)

The Other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_14_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses his article “TSA – Tenth Anniversary of a National Nightmare;” why individual TSA employees are part of the problem, since they could choose a non-coercive line of work; the expensive “bad attitude” fines for mouthing off to a TSA agent; the many air travelers who are grateful for their creeping totalitarian state; the lack of any significant success stories to justify the TSA’s immense budget, and how the 9/11 Commission betrayed Americans by producing a whitewashed report.

MP3 here. (18:28)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_11_kpfk_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the government’s premature bragging about foiling another underwear bomber terrorist plot – which became embarrassing when news broke about the bomber’s CIA/Saudi connection; Hillary Clinton’s well-founded doubts about arming Syria’s rebellion, whose ranks include al-Qaeda members and suicide bombers; why a “safe zone” in Syria is about as stupid as the “no fly zone” in Libya – and just as sure to start a larger war; the media’s disinterest in Libya since Gaddafi’s death and “mission accomplished,” even though human rights violations abound; the continued crackdown against peaceful protesters in Bahrain, though not even Al Jazeera finds it newsworthy; and how the US’s Middle East policy is geared toward maintaining a regional foothold and containing Iran, not exporting democracy.

MP3 here. (27:27)

 

Cora Currier

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_11_currier.mp3]

Journalist Cora Currier discusses her article “Timeline: How Obama Compares to Bush on Torture, Surveillance and Detention;” the government’s claim that there is oversight for the unprecedented expansion of executive power (it just can’t be verified because of state secrets); Obama’s duplicity on telecom immunity and his broken promise to prosecute the “warrantless wiretapping” Bush administration officials; evidence that CIA black sites are not actually closed; continuing proxy-torture with extraordinary renditions; and Obama’s legal case for drones strikes and assassinating US citizens.

MP3 here. (20:09)

Cora Currier is an fellow at ProPublica. was previously on the editorial staff of the New Yorker. She has written for the New Yorker’s website, The European, Let’s Go guides, and other publications. During the 2008 presidential election, she covered the youth vote for The Nation. She has also worked as a researcher for several books on history and politics. Cora graduated from Harvard College with a degree in Social Studies.

Yousaf Butt

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_11_butt.mp3]

Yousaf Butt, scientific consultant to the Federation of American Scientists, discusses his article “Debunking the Missile-Defense Myth;” how missile defense systems – as currently implemented – can be easily and cheaply overwhelmed with decoy warheads; more promising alternatives like boost-phase interceptors; carrying on the status quo to benefit defense contractors and to give NATO a reason to exist; Russia’s concern about US and NATO “defensive” missiles in Eastern Europe; and establishing a free market for nuclear energy, without government subsidies.

MP3 here. (20:36)

Dr. Yousaf Butt is a scientific consultant to the Federation of American Scientists and a physicist in the High-Energy Astrophysics Division at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He was on the instrument operations team responsible for the main focal plane instrument aboard NASA’s orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory from 1999-2004. Previously, he has been a fellow in the Committee on International Security and Arms Control at the National Academy of Sciences and a research fellow in the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. He has authored numerous papers on technical aspects of national and global security issues as well as on astrophysics and nuclear physics. He holds a Ph.D. in nuclear physics from Yale University and a dual B.S. in mechanical engineering and physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_10_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy, discusses his article “US Treasury Claim of Iran-al-Qaeda ‘Secret Deal’ Is Discredited;” how former intelligence officer Paul Pillar and the recently-released bin Laden documents reveal the Obama administration’s strategy of diplomatic coercion on Iran; the lack of evidence that cooperation between al-Qaeda and Iran extends beyond prisoner swap deals; the need for a quick-response team of former intelligence/government employees to immediately counter media propaganda; the Syrian opposition’s use of suicide attacks against the Assad government; and why bad foreign policy decisions will continue so long as government officials face no consequences for being wrong on issues of war and peace.

MP3 here. (23:37)

Gareth Porter is an investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy. The paperback edition of his latest book, Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam, was published in 2006.

Jacob Hornberger

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_11_hornberger.mp3]

Jacob Hornberger, founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses his article “It’s Again Time to Dismantle the Cold War Military Machine;” how Americans are kept in a perpetual state of fear so massive military budgets seem like a necessity; the Pentagon’s latest make-work project, fighting the War on Drugs in Honduras; how ending drug prohibition would decrease problems with gangs, violence, and public corruption; and the impressive stable of writers at the Future of Freedom Foundation.

MP3 here. (20:35)

Jacob G. Hornberger is founder and president of The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is a regular writer for The Future of Freedom Foundation’s publication, Freedom Daily, and is a co-editor or contributor to the eight books that have been published by the Foundation.

Philip Weiss

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_11_weiss.mp3]

Philip Weiss, investigative journalist and author of the blog MondoWeiss, discusses how Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu consolidated his political support and avoided early elections; why the centrist Kadima Party’s inclusion in Netanyahu’s coalition could make war with Iran more likely; how liberal Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz coordinated the sycophantic standing ovations during Netanyahu’s speech to Congress; President Obama’s inability to make tough decisions in the face of adversity; Pat Buchanan’s contrary take on WWII, The Unnecessary War; a simple visual of life as a Palestinian in an open-air prison; and why the peaceful protests in the Occupied Territories fail to garner any press coverage.

MP3 here. (38:00)

Philip Weiss is an investigative journalist who has written for The Nation, New York Times Magazine, The American Conservative, Jewish World Review and other publications. He is the author of American Taboo: A Murder in the Peace Corps.

Stephen Zunes

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_10_zunes.mp3]

Dr. Stephen Zunes, Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, discusses how the Libyan War spilled over to Mali and destabilized West Africa’s most enduring democracy; the Al-Qaeda associated Islamic militants that swarmed into Mali and desecrated a UNESCO World Heritage holy site; the US-trained African military officers who will probably be among the next generation of dictators; the double-standard of international law, where US allies are exempt from UNSC resolutions and enemies must comply or get regime-changed; how legitimate political uprisings are corrupted by foreign aid; and why picking sides in Syria is difficult for proponents of both individual liberty and anti-intervention.

MP3 here. (26:15)

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he chairs the program in Middle Eastern Studies. A native of North Carolina, Professor Zunes received his PhD. from Cornell University, his M.A. from Temple University and his B.A. from Oberlin College. He has previously served on the faculty of Ithaca College, the University of Puget Sound, and Whitman College. He serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, an associate editor of Peace Review, and chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

Lee Tien

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_09_tien.mp3]

Lee Tien, Senior Staff Attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, discusses the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) working its way through Congress; why the government means “surveillance” when they say “information sharing;” how popular outrage derailed SOPA/PIPA and made Congress more careful about introducing bills that make Google angry; fighting against automated license plate readers used by police to scan any car, without probable cause or warrant; the comprehensive legal protections for private companies that monitor and block internet traffic; and why Congress’s implementation of cyber security is the most invasive, inefficient, and expensive method imaginable.

MP3 here. (24:58)

Lee Tien is a Senior Staff Attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, specializing in free speech law, including intersections with intellectual property law and privacy law. Before joining EFF, Lee was a sole practitioner specializing in Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) litigation. Mr. Tien has published articles on children’s sexuality and information technology, anonymity, surveillance, and the First Amendment status of publishing computer software. Lee received his undergraduate degree in psychology from Stanford University, where he was very active in journalism at the Stanford Daily. After working as a news reporter at the Tacoma News Tribune for a year, Lee went to law school at Boalt Hall, University of California at Berkeley. Lee also did graduate work in the Program in Jurisprudence and Social Policy at UC-Berkeley.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_09_wheeler.mp3]

Blogger Marcy Wheeler discusses the CIA double-agent at the center of the latest underwear bomb plot; Saudi Arabia’s role in infiltrating AQAP and providing the US with intelligence inside Yemen; why alleged bombmaker Ibrahim al-Asiri hasn’t been captured or killed yet, despite having his high-profile plots foiled three times already; Congressman Peter King’s investigation of media coverage on the CIA’s double-agent – since honest journalism “may jeopardize the war on terror;” the Yemeni government’s incentive to inflate the threat of Al-Qaeda terrorism; why the Saudi government might be pretending to fight AQAP while surreptitiously pursuing a private agenda that has nothing to do with US security; and how out-of-control US government secrecy makes investigative journalism very difficult.

MP3 here. (22:11)

Blogger Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, grew up bi-coastally, starting with every town in New York with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, California, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal. Since then, she has lived in Western Massachusetts, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Ann Arbor, and — just recently — Western Michigan.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to Michigan; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton” — a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging. (Oh, and I hear Amazon still has the book for sale.)

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy met her husband Mr. emptywheel playing Ultimate Frisbee, though she retired from the sport several years ago. Marcy, Mr. EW and their dog — McCaffrey the MilleniaLab — live in a loft in a lovely urban hellhole.

Stephen Zunes

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_08_zunes.mp3]

Dr. Stephen Zunes, Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, discusses his article “University of California Takes Aim at Human Rights Activists;” UC President Mark Yudof’s likening of pro-Palestinian student activists to swastika-carving vandals; killing the free exchange of ideas in public universities; how excessive and unwarranted accusations of anti-Semitism lends credibility to real bigots; why racists should be defeated by rational argument, not silenced by law; and the established framework for a viable Israel-Palestine 2-state solution using the 1967 borders.

MP3 here. (19:59)

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he chairs the program in Middle Eastern Studies. A native of North Carolina, Professor Zunes received his PhD. from Cornell University, his M.A. from Temple University and his B.A. from Oberlin College. He has previously served on the faculty of Ithaca College, the University of Puget Sound, and Whitman College. He serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, an associate editor of Peace Review, and chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_08_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses his article “Iran’s Tactical Strength;” the conclusion of US war simulations studying Iran’s likely retaliation to an Israeli air strike; why the media and government officials from the US and Israel are suddenly less hawkish on Iran; the decade-long scare campaign that Hezbollah sleeper cells are all over the Western Hemisphere; the unlikely story of the CIA capturing explosives-ready underwear in Yemen, which supposedly prevented a terrorist attack; the US government’s contradictory claims that Al Qaeda is decimated, yet also a rapidly expanding threat justifying more foreign interventions; and why the events of 9/11 deserve a complete reexamination.

MP3 here. (39:40)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_07_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, member of Veterans For Peace and former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses Russian Gen. Nikolai Makarov’s suggestion that a NATO missile-defense shield in Eastern Europe could be the target of a Russian pre-emptive strike; the laughable justification of the missile shield as protection (for Poland and Romania?) against Iranian nuclear missiles; how President Bush funneled more government money to defense contractors by withdrawing from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; and how the US is replacing the MAD (mutually assured destruction) nuclear doctrine with a disarming first-strike capability, forcing Russia to institute launch-on-warning and greatly increasing the chance of nuclear war.

MP3 here. (19:31)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Franklin Lamb

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_07_lamb.mp3]

Franklin Lamb, Director of Americans Concerned for Middle East Peace, discusses his article “The Lutfallah II Arms-Smuggling Scandal;” funneling weapons from Libya to Syria’s rebels, apparently helped by Saudi Arabia and Qatar; the pending case against NATO in the International Criminal Court; why foreign-orchestrated regime change in Syria will be much harder than it was in Libya; the disastrous US democracy-building exercises in the Middle East; and the reliability of news and casualty figures coming from Syrian sources.

MP3 here. (21:56)

Dr. Franklin Lamb is Director of Americans Concerned for Middle East Peace, Beirut-Washington DC, Board Member of The Sabra Shatila Foundation, and a volunteer with the Palestine Civil Rights Campaign, Lebanon. He is the author of The Price We Pay: A Quarter-Century of Israel’s Use of American Weapons Against Civilians in Lebanon and is doing research in Lebanon for his next book.

Lamb has been a Professor of International Law at Northwestern College of Law in Oregon. He earned his Law Degree at Boston University and his LLM, M.Phil, and PhD degrees at the London School of Economics. As a Middle East expert and commentator, Dr. Lamb has appeared on Press TV, Al-Manar and several other media outlets. His articles and analyses have been published by Counter Punch, Veterans Today, Intifada Palestine, Electronic Intifada, Opinion Maker, Dissident Voice, Daily Star and Al Ahram.

 

 

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_07_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses his article “The Everyday Evil of America’s Torture State;” Daniel Chong’s “accidental” 5 day incarceration during which he was without food or water, handcuffed and in complete darkness; the “Gitmo-ization” of the US justice system; other anecdotes of the cops torturing and killing Americans without being fired or prosecuted; the Michigan State Supreme Court’s unusual recognition of the right to resist unlawful arrest; the realization of Alan Dershowitz’s “torture warrants;” and how the prison-industrial complex profits from expanding the War on Drugs.

MP3 here. (38:07)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_03_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy, discusses his article “US-Afghan Pact Won’t End War or Night Raids;” President Obama’s stealthy press conference/campaign event in Afghanistan, where he pretended that the war is coming to an end; why an Iraq-model transition to self-governance won’t work in Afghanistan; the Afghan Army’s high turnover rate and general lack of purpose; why the decade-long continuing US occupation can best be described as “Operation: enduring hatred;” the “budget Armageddon” soon coming to the Pentagon, no matter who wins the 2012 election; and why the “Iran is an existential threat to Israel” line isn’t working anymore.

MP3 here. (34:35)

Gareth Porter is an investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy. The paperback edition of his latest book, Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam, was published in 2006.

Naureen Shah

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_04_shah.mp3]

Naureen Shah, Associate Director of the Counterterrorism and Human Rights Project at Columbia Law School, discusses her article “Drone attacks and the Brennan doctrine;” US counter-terrorism adviser John Brennan’s admission that civilians are killed in drone strikes (after previously asserting “there hasn’t been a single collateral death because of the exceptional proficiency, precision of the capabilities that we’ve been able to develop”); the rhetorical means of avoiding civilian casualties (simply call them terrorists); remotely killing people halfway around the world, based on information from paid informants or culturally ignorant inferences; the legality of drone warfare, and whether it even matters; and rumors of a “rendition 2.0” torture outsourcing program under Obama.

MP3 here. (24:12)

Naureen Shah is Associate Director of the Counterterrorism and Human Rights Project and Lecturer-in-Law of the Human Rights Clinic at Columbia Law School.

Naureen develops research and advocacy on human rights and counterterrorism policy, including transfer of detainees, safeguards against torture, and lethal targeting with drone technology. Since joining the Human Rights Institute in 2009, she has researched and written on emergent transnational counterterrorism practices, including diplomatic assurances, Afghan detention practices, repatriations from the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo, deportation of terrorism suspects, and targeted killings.

Naureen also conducts network building work among leading litigators, advocates, activists and scholars in the counterterrorism and human rights field, to promote collaborations and generating of innovative advocacy and research.Prior to joining Columbia, Naureen was a Leonard H. Sandler Fellow at Human Rights Watch, based in London. She is the author of the August 2009 report “Broken System: Dysfunction, Abuse, and Impunity in the Indian Police.” Prior to Human Rights Watch, Naureen worked at the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on refugee appeals cases.

Naureen holds a B.S. from Northwestern University in Journalism and Gender Studies, cum laude. She holds a J.D. from Columbia Law School, where she was a James Kent Scholar and Harlan Fiske Stone scholar, and received the Lowenstein Fellowship awarded to outstanding graduates pursuing public interest law. She served as Articles Editor on the Columbia Human Rights Law Review.

Ari Berman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_04_berman.mp3]

Ari Berman, contributing writer for The Nation, discusses his article “Mitt Romney’s Neocon War Cabinet;” the Bush administration rejects (John Bolton, Eric Edelman, Dan Senor) who will fill senior government posts should Romeny win election; the ability of neoconservatives to shrug off abysmal failures (like the Iraq War) and remain credible mainstream media figures; why Americans shouldn’t – but usually do – overlook presidential supporting casts; and why a Romney victory in 2012 will likely be followed by an Iran War in 2013.

MP3 here. (21:04)

Ari Berman is a contributing writer for The Nation magazine and an Investigative Journalism Fellow at The Nation Institute. He has written extensively about American politics, foreign policy and the intersection of money and politics. His stories have also appeared in the New York Times, Rolling Stone and The Guardian, and he is a frequent guest and political commentator on MSNBC, C-Span and NPR. His first book, Herding Donkeys: The Fight to Rebuild the Democratic Party and Reshape American Politics, was published in October 2010 by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. He graduated from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University with a degree in journalism and political science.

Marc Guttman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_03_guttman.mp3]

Marc Guttman, editor of the book Why Peace, discusses the collection of pro-peace, pro-liberty essays selected for Why Peace; exposing the state aggression of the US and other governments around the world; the roster of contributing writers, including many former soldiers and a full roster of Antiwar.com regulars; and how the internet functions as a “2nd Amendment for the 1st Amendment,” helping circumvent mainstream media information-domination.

MP3 here. (18:53)

Marc Guttman is an emergency physician and the editor of two books, Why Peace and Why Liberty.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_04_kpfk_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy, discusses his article “The Truth Behind the Official Story of Finding Bin Laden;” Pakistani Brig. Gen. (retired) Shaukat Qadir’s new book Operation Geronimo: the Betrayal and Execution of Osama bin Laden and its Aftermath; how bin Laden was ousted from Al Qaeda’s leadership and tricked into exile in Abbottabad, Pakistan; debunking the two big lies – that Pakistan’s ISI was hiding bin Laden, and that intelligence gathered from torture helped locate him; and Al Qaeda’s success (as revealed in Syed Saleem Shahzad’s book) in recruiting/radicalizing Pashtun tribes in northwestern Pakistan.

MP3 here. (27:51)

Gareth Porter is an investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy. The paperback edition of his latest book, Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam, was published in 2006.

Robert Parry

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_02_parry.mp3]

Robert Parry, founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com, discusses the many Israeli officials who are downplaying the “Iranian threat” and speaking out against Prime Minister Netanyahu‘s extremism; the pro-Netanyahu Americans who heckled former PM Uhud Olmert during his insufficiently-hawkish speech in New York; Israeli criticism of Netanyahu as “messianic” and not serious about a Palestinian peace; and why the initial P5+1 talks with Iran are good for Obama’s reelection bid, gas prices, and peace in the Middle East.

MP3 here. (18:13)

Robert Parry is an investigative journalist who won the George Polk Award in 1984 for reporting on the Iran-Contra affair and uncovering Oliver North’s involvement in it. He is the founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com and author of Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush, Trick or Treason: The October Surprise Mystery and Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.

John Mueller

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_02_mueller.mp3]

John Mueller, author of Atomic Obsession: Nuclear Alarmism from Hiroshima to Al-Qaeda, discusses his article “Why Al-Qaeda May Never Die;” how “al-Qaeda” is used as a catchall name for terrorist groups, even those tangentially related to the original; why a large percentage of Americans fear terrorism even though dying in an attack is about as likely as being struck by lightning; US alliances with radical Islamic insurgents in Libya and Syria; and how imperial overreach hastened the Soviet Union’s collapse.

MP3 here. (20:23)

John Mueller is the Woody Hayes Chair of National Security Studies and Professor of Political Science at Ohio State University. He is the author of Overblown and The Remnants of War, winner of the Joseph P. Lepgold Prize for the best book on international relations in 2004, awarded by Georgetown University.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_02_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses former #3 CIA boss Jose Rodriguez’s defense of torture and the destruction of interrogation videos (that he ordered); Rodriguez’s claim that the tapes were shredded to protect CIA agents from Al Qaeda retribution, not to coverup criminal acts; how the Department of Justice erodes the rule of law by failing to prosecute former officials bragging about their crimes on television; and the systemic torture practiced by US officials that extended far beyond waterboarding.

MP3 here. (19:48)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Michael Ratner

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_01_ratner.mp3]

Michael Ratner, President Emeritus of the Center for Constitutional Rights, discusses his article “Bradley Manning: a show trial of state secrecy;” Manning’s quasi-public trial (which is open to observation, yet vital evidence and court documents are withheld from the media and public); why the NY Times is just as guilty of “aiding the enemy” as Manning and WikiLeaks; how President Obama and Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta made a fair trial impossible; and how you can support Bradley Manning in his time of need.

MP3 here. (15:33)

Michael Ratner is President Emeritus of the Center for Constitutional Rights.

 

David K. Shipler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_01_shipler.mp3]

David K. Shipler, former NY Times reporter and author of Rights at Risk: The Limits of Liberty in Modern America, discusses his article “Terrorist Plots, Hatched by the F.B.I.;” the convicted felons used as FBI informants to ensnare the lowest-hanging fruit among potential terrorists; why an “entrapment” legal defense hardly ever works; the media’s failure to attribute domestic terrorism arrests to government sting operations; how the FBI could “entrap” terrorism suspects into working in an Islamic soup kitchen instead of pretending to blow up a bridge; the massive imbalance between surveillance data and the human analysts and investigators tasked with reading it all; and the strange story of “underbomber” Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab.

Update: Your host was wrong. The Detroit News took Kennedy out of context. The video makes it clear he was speaking generally, not specifically about the Underbomber.

MP3 here. (30:06)

David K. Shipler is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and former foreign correspondent of The New York Times. He is the author of The Working Poor: Invisible in America and Rights at Risk: The Limits of Liberty in Modern America.