Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_28_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses his “War and Inflation“speech at a 2008 Future of Freedom Foundation conference;” how central banking allows governments to fund wars and empire through money printing instead of direct taxation, keeping a lid on internal dissent; why deflation is a normal and desirable condition of productive economies; and why Keynesianism is best summarized as the economics of state power.

MP3 here. (22:08)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Pepe Escobar

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_27_escobar.mp3]

Globetrotting journalist Pepe Escobar discusses his article “Syria and Turkey’s Phantom War;” Turkey’s violation of Syrian airspace in a purposeful, measured provocation and test of Syria’s defenses; the near-invocation of NATO Article 5 and a wider war (an attack on one NATO country is an attack on all); looking for ways to bypass the UN on Syria, since China and Russia won’t let an interventionist resolution pass the Security Council; grand plans for NATO expansion in the official “Assured Security, Dynamic Engagement” plan; counterrevolutions in the Middle East and South America, as the US looks to rebuild its portfolio of client states; and how Qatar has become the new superpower in the Middle East, surpassing even Saudi Arabia.

MP3 here. (39:25)

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving Into Liquid War and Obama Does Globalistan.

An extreme traveler, Pepe’s nose for news has taken him to all parts of the globe. He was in Afghanistan and interviewed the military leader of the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, Ahmad Shah Masoud, a couple of weeks before his assassination. Two weeks before September 11, 2001, while Pepe was in the tribal areas of Pakistan, Asia Times Online published his prophetic piece, “Get Osama! Now! Or else …” Pepe was one of the first journalists to reach Kabul after the Taliban’s retreat, and more recently he has explored and reported from Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, US and China.

Jacob Hornberger

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_26_hornberger.mp3]

Jacob Hornberger, founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses his article “Needed: A National Debate on U.S. Support of Dictatorships;” the 1953 CIA-supported coup in Iran, leading to the hostage crisis, 1979 Islamic Revolution, and poor relations to this day; the US-supplied Iraqi weapons of mass-destruction; the conditional US anti-dictator policy (cooperative dictators needn’t fear regime-change); why Americans may finally be catching on to the War on Terrorism farce; and cutting the federal budget by eliminating aid to foreign dictators.

MP3 here. (20:05)

Jacob G. Hornberger is founder and president of The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is a regular writer for The Future of Freedom Foundation’s publication, Freedom Daily, and is a co-editor or contributor to the eight books that have been published by the Foundation.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_25_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy, discusses why the Obama administration is leaking their diplomatic strategy to the media prior to commencing Iran talks; how Obama’s hard-line on Iran sanctions allows him to claim that Israel’s demands are his demands; the IAEA’s real job: make Iran look uncooperative and suspicious; why the alleged “clean-up” at Iran’s Parchin site is as unbelievable as Iraq’s mobile germ warfare labs in 2003; and how election-year politics queered an Iran deal and hindered Obama’s ability to negotiate (but isn’t it always an election year, or something?)

MP3 here. (26:48)

Gareth Porter is an investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy, and was awarded the 2012 Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism. The paperback edition of his latest book, Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam, was published in 2006.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_25_morrow.mp3]

IPS News journalist Adam Morrow discusses how Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Morsi’s presidential victory averted a crisis in Egypt; the Egyptian military’s continued supremacy, as the parliament remains dissolved and the national constitution unfinished; valid suspicions that Egypt’s prominent Islamists could have ties to the CIA; Washington’s fear that Egypt is developing an independent foreign policy; and why Israel might not dare carry out another Operation Cast Lead rampage in Gaza.

MP3 here. (21:21)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Winslow T. Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_21_wheeler.mp3]

Winslow Wheeler, director of the Straus Military Reform Project at the Center for Defense Information, discusses his article “The Jet That Ate the Pentagon;” the large portion of procurement money earmarked for the F-35; why single-purpose planes are better and cheaper than multipurpose ones; and the price/performance penalty inherent in stealth aircraft.

MP3 here. (20:32)

Winslow Wheeler is director of the Straus Military Reform Project at the Center for Defense Information. Previously, he worked for 31 years on national security issues for Republican and Democratic senators on Capitol Hill and for the Government Accountability Office. He is editor of the anthology The Pentagon Labyrinth: 10 Short Essays to Help You Through It.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_25_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses his article “Terrorism Arithmetic;” the National Counter Terrorism Center’s annual Report on Terrorism, which statistically proves that Americans are more likely to be killed by televisions than terrorists; the political realities that push Democratic presidents toward ultraviolence (which Obama seems to really enjoy); how international terrorists groups like al-Qaeda have given way to small franchises focused on local issues; the mainstream media’s better-late-than-never reporting on covert US support for Syrian regime change; and the self-perpetuating cycle of US foreign policy, where a new intervention is undertaken to fix a previous botched job, ad infinitum.

MP3 here. (29:16)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest.

Marjorie Cohn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_22_cohn_kpfk.mp3]

Marjorie Cohn, Professor of Law at Thomas Jefferson School of Law, discusses her article “Hope Dies at Guantanamo;” how the landmark Boumediene v. Bush SCOTUS decision on habeas corpus rights for Guantanamo prisoners became meaningless; and the DC Appeals Court’s invention of “presumption of regularity,” which asserts government infallibility and denies defendants a “meaningful opportunity” to contest their detentions.

MP3 here. (16:24)

Marjorie Cohn is a Professor of Law at Thomas Jefferson School of Law and past president of the National Lawyers Guild. She is editor of The United States and Torture: Interrogation, Incarceration, and Abuse.

Stephen Zunes

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_22_zunes_kpfk.mp3]

Dr. Stephen Zunes, Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, discusses the US Congress’s push for war with Iran on the eve of P5+1 talks in Moscow; the Sudanese migrant laborers and political refugees who risk mass-deportation from Israel; and the self defeating US anti-terrorism policy in Africa.

MP3 here. (13:29)

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he chairs the program in Middle Eastern Studies. A native of North Carolina, Professor Zunes received his PhD. from Cornell University, his M.A. from Temple University and his B.A. from Oberlin College. He has previously served on the faculty of Ithaca College, the University of Puget Sound, and Whitman College. He serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, an associate editor of Peace Review, and chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_22_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, discusses Ron Paul as an economic prophet of sorts (revered by devout followers, scorned by the majority); Woods’s personal transformation from party-line Republican to peace and liberty advocate; Paul’s paradigm shifting moment, where he stood up to Rudy Giuliani’s ignorant tirade about 9/11 in the 2008 Republican primaries; and how the college kids who are reading Mises instead of Keynes – thanks to Ron Paul – could change academia for a generation.

MP3 here. (20:15)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Reza Marashi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_22_marashi.mp3]

Reza Marashi, Research Director for the National Iranian American Council, discusses the failed P5+1 Iran talks in Moscow; why there was a diplomatic breakdown and unwillingness to compromise, even though Obama seems eager to avoid war; how the default US position – that Iran is building a nuclear weapons program – dooms negotiations to failure; and the root cause of conflict (the US wants Middle East client states, while Iran removed the imperial yoke in 1979 and isn’t going back to it).

MP3 here. (19:45)

Reza Marashi joined NIAC in 2010 as the organization’s first Research Director. He came to NIAC after four years in the Office of Iranian Affairs at the U.S. Department of State. Prior to his tenure at the State Department, he was an analyst at the Institute for National Strategic Studies (INSS) covering China-Middle East issues, and a Tehran-based private strategic consultant on Iranian political and economic risk. Marashi is frequently consulted by Western governments on Iran-related matters. His articles have appeared in The Atlantic, Foreign Policy, The National Interest, Tehran Bureau, the Huffington Post, Salon, Asharq Alawsat, the Daily Caller, and the Cairo Review of Global Affairs. He has been a guest contributor to the BBC, NPR, Financial Times, Reuters, Al Jazeera, ABC News, CBC News, Macleans, Fox News, The Daily Star and The National.

Michael Klare

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_22_klare.mp3]

Michael Klare, professor and author of Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet, discusses his article “Is Barack Obama Morphing Into Dick Cheney;” the Bush and Obama administrations’ striking policy similarities on oil geopolitics; peak oil theory and the disappearance of “easy” oil; Cheney’s National Energy Policy of 2001, which adivsed more oil imports from Africa; and Obama’s expansion of AFRICOM to pursue terrorist threats on the continent (of course limited to the oil-producing regions).

MP3 here. (19:22)

Michael T. Klare is a professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College, a TomDispatch regular, and the author, most recently, of Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet. A documentary movie version of his previous book, Blood and Oil, is available from the Media Education Foundation. His newest book, The Race for What’s Left: The Global Scramble for the World’s Last Resources, is due out in March.

Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_15_vlahos.mp3]

Regular Antiwar.com columnist Kelley B. Vlahos discusses her article “The CIA and Polio in Pakistan;” how Dr. Shakil Afridi set up a fake immunization campaign to help the CIA in their effort to pinpoint Osama bin Laden’s location in Abbottabad; how the immunization ruse further undermined public confidence in vaccinations in one of the last countries with Polio cases; and the reality of life in an iron lung.

MP3 here. (20:04)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos, a Washington, D.C.-based freelance writer, is a longtime political reporter for FoxNews.com and a contributing editor at The American Conservative. She is also a Washington correspondent for Homeland Security Today magazine. Her Twitter account is @KelleyBVlahos.

Ivan Eland

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_21_eland.mp3]

Ivan Eland, Senior Fellow at The Independent Institute and regular contributor to Antiwar.com, discusses his new book No War For Oil: U.S. Dependency and the Middle East; why it isn’t necessary to secure oil supplies with military force; how US meddling in the Middle East increases oil prices and destabilizes regional governments; why national energy independence is a foolish pursuit; his article “Smoke and Mirrors in Energy Policy;” and how sanctions on Iranian oil exports help China and India get a discount on their energy needs.

MP3 here. (21:44)

Ivan Eland is a senior fellow at the Independent Institute and author of Recarving Rushmore: Ranking the Presidents on Peace, Prosperity, and Liberty.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_21_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the comical chronic legal problems of successive Pakistani prime ministers; the evolution of Boko Haram from a “loopy sect” to a US-designated international terrorist group; and the blowback from Nigeria’s military massacre of Boko Haram members (who quickly swapped their bows and arrows for machine guns).

MP3 here. (21:31)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Eva Galperin

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_20_galperin.mp3]

Eva Galperin, International Freedom of Expression Coordinator for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, discusses her article about pro-Syrian-government hackers using malicious computer software against Syrian activists; the online information battle between loyalists and anti-government groups, in the absence of on-the-ground media; why Skype isn’t any safer to use than social media like Facebook; protecting yourself online by encrypting communications and staying informed about threats; and how rudimentary hacking tools can be just as effective as the very sophisticated and expensive Stuxnet and Flame viruses.

MP3 here. (18:11)

A lifelong geek, Eva Galperin misspent her youth working as a Systems Administrator all over Silicon Valley. Since then, she has seen the error of her ways and earned degrees in Political Science and International Relations from SFSU. She comes to EFF from the US-China Policy Institute, where she researched Chinese energy policy, helped to organize conferences, and attempted to make use of her rudimentary Mandarin skills. Her interests include aerials, rock climbing, opera, and not being paged at 3 o’clock in the morning because the mail server is down.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_19_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the moral and practical problems of US support for Syria’s opposition; how foreign meddling prolongs civil conflicts and reduces incentive to negotiate; why the German media’s contrary version of the Houla massacre is no more (or less) believable than the official story blaming the government; the war hawks in Congress who want Syrian regime change to weaken Iran, not for any humanitarian reason; and why policy makers aren’t thinking of intervention’s consequences, namely blowback.

MP3 here. (20:19)

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_19_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses his article “Judicially Authorized Rape: The Newest Weapon in the Prohibitionist Arsenal;” the stories of three victims of forced catheterizing by the police; more evidence that cops are habitual liars and shouldn’t be trusted; two cops who were promoted instead of getting prison time for sexually assaulting Stephan Cook; the “qualified immunity” legal exemption for costume-wearing state employees who break the law; and how the US is like a prison environment writ large, where civilians are convicts and cops are prison guards.

MP3 here. (22:05)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_18_morrow.mp3]

IPS News journalist Adam Morrow discusses Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi’s narrow victory in Egypt’s presidential runoff election; how Egypt’s military and supreme constitutional court are subverting civilian government and democratic reforms; the danger of false flag bombings designed to sow unrest and discredit the Islamists; and why Egypt’s military is better suited for domestic repression than national defense.

MP3 here. (21:28)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

Richard Silverstein

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_14_silverstein.mp3]

Richard Silverstein, writer of the Tikun Olam blog, discusses his article “Flame: Israel’s New Contribution to Middle East Cyberwar;” the IDF’s “Unit 8200” cyberwarfare department; the differences between industrial-sabotage virus Stuxnet and the sophisticated espionage worm Flame; how state-created computer viruses can get out of control and wreak havoc on their creators; President Obama’s antisocial foreign policy of anonymous drone strikes and cyber attacks; and the US’s rejection of Russia’s proposed international ban on cyberwar (Max Boot hates the idea, so maybe the Russians were on to something).

MP3 here. (21:46)

Richard Silverstein has been writing Tikun Olam, one of the earliest liberal Jewish blogs, since February, 2003. It focuses on Israeli-Palestinian peace but includes commentary on U.S. politics, a world music mp3 blog, and other writing on Jewish life, literature, and culture.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_13_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, internationally syndicated columnist and author of American Raj, discusses his article “Egypt Headed for an Explosion;” the vote-rigging funny business that enabled a Mubarak retread to get in the presidential runoff election; why Egypt won’t remain a US client state, 2 billion a year in military aid notwithstanding; how the US Navy came to be both tremendously expensive and strategically useless; the USAF’s critical role in US foreign policy; and the Pentagon’s promotion of China as the next big threat to justify their enormous budget.

MP3 here. (20:21)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_13_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses his article “Under Obama’s Reign, Habeas Corpus Rights Wrenched Away;” how the DC Circuit court has undermined Boumediene v. Bush and effectively taken away all legal recourse for the 169 remaining Guantanamo prisoners; how President Obama bypasses the courts entirely by killing suspected terrorists (and/or dark-skinned civilians) with drone strikes; the enemy-combatant status of all drone victims, unless proven otherwise posthumously (some consolation); the double standard that gets ACLU drone lawsuits dismissed over “state secrets” but allows Obama to leak information and campaign as a warrior-president; and why it seems like the US is trying really hard to provoke another 9/11.

MP3 here. (20:02)

 

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_12_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses his debate with the “Prince of Darkness” (Richard Perle) on BBC Radio; the Obama administration’s refusal to apologize for the deadly November attack on a Pakistani military outpost – even though critical supply lines to Afghanistan remain closed as a consequence; the technological barrier preventing other countries from using drones the way the US does; and how the dearth of journalists in Syria allows the Western media to spin the narrative any way they choose.

MP3 here. (20:05)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com. His op-ed pieces have been published in newspapers and other media around the world.

Joe Lauria

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_11_lauria.mp3]

Independent investigative journalist Joe Lauria discusses his article “Security Council Blames Syria for Attack;” allegations that the Houla massacre was actually Sunni rebels killing pro-government Alawites and Shia; why Bashar al-Assad deserves the blame for Syria’s civil unrest; the media’s scant coverage of al-Qaeda’s presence within Syria’s rebellion; Russia’s strategic interests in Syria aside from the Tartus naval port; why NATO intervention would almost certainly worsen the crisis; and the revenge massacres likely to follow in the wake of Syrian regime change, with a Sunni Islamist government in charge.

MP3 here. (21:41)

Joe Lauria is a New York-based independent investigative journalist. A freelance member of the Sunday Times of London Insight team, he has also worked on investigations for the Boston Globe and Bloomberg News. Joe’s articles have additionally appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Mail, The Guardian, The Montreal Gazette, The Johannesburg Star, The Washington Times, New York Magazine, ARTnews and other publications.

Giorgio Cafiero

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_11_cafiero.mp3]

Foreign Policy in Focus contributor Giorgio Cafiero discusses his article “Resurgent Arab Nationalism in Egypt;” a history lesson on Gamal Abdel Nasser and Egypt’s non-aligned independence during the Cold War; US support for the Muslim Brotherhood as a bulwark against Arab nationalism; how Egypt was brought under US influence after the 1973 Yom Kippur War demonstrated the power of Arab unity against Israel; the current runoff presidential election in Egypt, which does not include the popular 3rd place nationalist candidate Hamdeen Sabahi; the big divide between supporters of an Egyptian Islamic state and those preferring an inclusive secular state; and why the Muslim Brotherhood won’t push the military out of politics – which means no foreign policy changes or major rifts with Israel.

MP3 here. (18:31)

Giorgio Cafiero writes for Foreign Policy in Focus.

Sarah Marusek

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_11_marusek.mp3]

Sarah Marusek, social science doctoral candidate at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University, discusses her article “West Must Recognize Peaceful Palestinian Resistance Movement;” the hundreds of thousands of down-and-out Palestinian refugees in Lebanon who, inspired by the Arab Spring uprisings in Egypt and beyond, are demonstrating to get back home; the surprising alliance between competing Palestinian factions (Fatah, Hamas) and militant groups (Islamic Jihad) that are joining together for peaceful rallies; the mainstream media’s refusal to cover (or contemplate) an event that shows Palestinians peacefully resisting Israeli occupation; and the leading women activists in the Palestinian movement.

MP3 here. (17:57)

Sarah Marusek is a member of the International Central Committee of the Global March to Jerusalem and is a social science doctoral candidate at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is in Lebanon on an International Education Graduate Fellowship for International Study to research Islamic charities.

Ron Kukal

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_08_kukal.mp3]

Ron Kukal, former US Navy Petty Officer and USS Liberty survivor, discusses his firsthand account of Israel’s attack on the Liberty on June 8, 1967; the carnage of dead sailors below decks from the Israeli torpedo strike; Phil Tourney’s book What I Saw That Day; how PTSD still effects Kukal’s life and family relationships; the dangers facing Liberty survivors who dare tell the truth about the attack; and Kukal’s thanks to the rescue ships and sailors who saved the Liberty from sinking and helped get it back to port.

MP3 here. (23:35)

Ron Kukal is a former chaplain for the USS Liberty Veterans Association. He was a US Navy 1st Class Petty Officer stationed on the USS Liberty during Israel’s attack on June 8, 1967.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_08_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, internationally syndicated columnist and author of American Raj, discusses the fundamentally flawed Middle East countries created after the Ottoman Empire’s dissolution; the US’s first attempt at regime change in Syria in 1948, as told in The Game of Nations: The Amorality of Power Politics; a history of the Baath Party; the chance for regional autonomy in Syria instead of a bloody civil war; why the US insists on picking fights with Russia in Azerbaijan, Georgia and Syria; and why Georgia’s inclusion in NATO would be as ridiculous as Puerto Rico joining the Warsaw pact.

MP3 here. (38:12)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_08_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the corrupt narco-state of Afghanistan; the Russian mafia’s control of heroin distribution to Western Europe; former CIA Deputy Director for Operations Jose Rodriguez’s torture defense (and book promotion) on the talk-show circuit; Secretary of State Clinton’s promotion of internet freedom while President Obama wages cyber warfare on Iran and plans an internet “kill switch;” Obama’s dictatorial powers under the National Defense Resources Preparedness Executive Order; and how government surveillance has increased so dramatically since “Total Information Awareness” was halted by Congress in 2003.

MP3 here. (20:15)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_06_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy, discusses his article “US Rejected 2005 Iranian Offer Ensuring No Nuclear Weapons;” the Bush administration’s hardline stance against even a single Iranian centrifuge; how the MEK “laundered” Israeli intelligence on the Natanz facility, providing enough disinformation for years of anti-Iran propaganda; and Iran’s offer to have all its low-enriched uranium converted into fuel-rods, which cannot be used to make nuclear weapons.

MP3 here. (19:02)

Gareth Porter is an investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy. The paperback edition of his latest book, Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam, was published in 2006.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_05_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, internationally syndicated columnist and author of American Raj, discusses Pakistan’s potential for dissolution; the Lebanonization of Syria; why Defense Secretary Leon Panetta is urging India to get more involved in Afghanistan; India’s big-spending on Afghanistan’s ethnic minorities; and what a foreign military “trainer” really is.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Nick Turse

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_05_turse.mp3]

Nick Turse, associate editor of TomDispatch.com, discusses his article “A Drone-Eat-Drone World;” the Pentagon’s eager anticipation of autonomous drones that decide when and where to rain death from above; why drones are rapidly proliferating even though they aren’t effective in fighting and winning wars; the 1-to-1 UAV flight time to maintenance ratio; and the ability of drones to evade rifle-wielding tribesmen – but not semi-modern air defenses (or Pakistani public opinion).

MP3 here. (19:20)

Nick Turse is the associate editor of TomDispatch.com. An award-winning journalist, his work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the Nation, and regularly at TomDispatch. He is the author/editor of several books, including the just published Terminator Planet: The First History of Drone Warfare, 2001-2050 (with Tom Engelhardt). You can follow him on Twitter @NickTurse, on Tumblr, and on Facebook.

Nikolas Kozloff

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_04_kozloff.mp3]

Nikolas Kozloff, author of Hugo Chavez: Oil, Politics and the Challenge to the U.S., discusses his article “What’s Behind Obama’s New Military Base in Chile;” doubts about the base’s official purpose as peacekeeper training facility, considering the recent history of US interference in South America; the Chilean government’s fight (aided by the FBI) with the Mapuche Indians over control of natural resources; US worries about Brazil as a future near-peer competitor; why the School of the Americas (now WHINSEC) is still a popular destination for Chilean military officers; and the intricacies of US-Venezuelan relations.

MP3 here. (21:45)

Nikolas Kozloff is a New York-based writer. A former academic, he received his doctorate in Latin American history from Oxford University. The author of Hugo Chavez: Oil, Politics and the Challenge to the U.S., and Revolution! South America and the Rise of the New Left, he also writes for such venues as al-Jazeera English. He has provided political analysis for the BBC and National Public Radio, and even put in a guest appearance on the Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

Few have written as extensively as Kozloff about Latin America and the wider region. For years, he has been reporting on Venezuela, as well as the political phenomenon of populism. An expert on U.S. foreign policy in Latin America, he has also covered Central America and, more recently, rising star Brazil. In addition, Kozloff is the author of No Rain in the Amazon: How South America’s Climate Change Affects the Entire Planet, and frequently writes articles about the environment and climate change.

A frequent columnist on the WikiLeaks scandal, Kozloff has written about secret U.S. diplomatic cables and their relationship to American foreign policy. Furthermore, he recently founded The Revolutionary Handbook interview project and has been an ongoing commentator on the “Occupy” movement.

Kozloff just published a satiric novel, Post Academic Stress Disorder. The New York Times calls the book a “wry novel about the anarchists, spiritualists, health nuts, pet lovers, and pie-throwers of the East Village.”

Patrick Cockburn

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_04_cockburn.mp3]

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent, discusses his article “Why War is Marching on the Road to Damascus;” assigning blame for the Houla massacre and whether it will spark US intervention; why Syria looks like Lebanon before its disastrous 15-year civil war; Saudi Arabia’s continued fight against Iran’s 1979 revolution and the Shia revival; why NATO “safe haven” zones would exacerbate conflict in Syria and lead to wider war; Iraq’s export of suicide bombers; how crony capitalism undermines popular support for Middle East/North Africa governments; and why US politicians don’t care much for long-term sensible foreign policy.

MP3 here. (23:10)

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent, has been visiting Iraq since 1978. He was awarded the 2005 Martha Gellhorn prize for war reporting in recognition of his writing on Iraq. He is the author of, his memoir, The Broken Boy (Jonathan Cape, 2005), and with Andrew Cockburn, Saddam Hussein: An American Obsession (Verso, The Occupation: War, Resistance and Daily Life in Iraq (Verso, 2006) and Muqtada: Muqtada al-Sadr, the Shia revival and the Struggle for Iraq.

Robert Naiman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_04_naiman.mp3]

Robert Naiman, Policy Director at Just Foreign Policy, discusses his article “Yes, Virginia, We Can Do Something About the Drone Strikes;” the US government’s determination that military-age males killed by drones are always enemy combatants; targeting people for assassination that aren’t even on the “kill list” (as if the list itself wasn’t bad enough); opposition to Obama’s drone program from within his own administration and Congress; how regular people can (indirectly) change federal policy; and how drone strikes have become the best recruitment tool for anti-US militants since Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib.

MP3 here. (19:55)

Robert Naiman is Policy Director at Just Foreign Policy. Mr. Naiman edits the Just Foreign Policy daily news summary and writes on U.S. foreign policy at Huffington Post. He is president of the board of Truthout. Naiman has worked as a policy analyst and researcher at the Center for Economic and Policy Research and Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. He has masters degrees in economics and mathematics from the University of Illinois and has studied and worked in the Middle East.

Jason Leopold

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_30_leopold.mp3]

Jason Leopold, lead investigative reporter of Truthout and author of News Junkie, discusses his exclusive article on Hesham Abu Zubaidah, brother of the infamous “high-value detainee” al-Qaeda member; the two years Hesham spent in jail for an immigration violation after 9/11 – during which he was constantly questioned about his long-estranged brother; our total reliance on government-sourced information on (terrorism suspect) Abu Zubaidah; the indispensable Andy Worthington; and how the FBI convinced Hesham to become a government informant and testify in court against his brother.

MP3 here. (21:07)

Jason Leopold is lead investigative reporter of Truthout. He is the author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, News Junkie, a memoir.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_01_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses his article “What to Remember on Memorial Day;” Westward expansion and the 19th century genocide of American Indians; the different negotiating tactics of private and government-subsidized railroads; Dr. Seuss’s anti-Japanese propaganda during WWII; historical revisionism and the sometimes-counterproductive American Indian activism in the 1960s and 70s; and how the state demonizes its enemies to justify their extermination – from 19th century Plains Indians to 21st century Afghans.

MP3 here. (20:01)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Stephen Zunes

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_01_zunes.mp3]

Dr. Stephen Zunes, Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, discusses his article “Bipartisan Assault on Middle East Peace;” the overwhelming passage of H.R. 4133, which commits the US to defend Israel as a “Jewish state;” the lunatics in Congress that make the Obama administration look downright rational in comparison; how the US raises the bar on Arab concessions to Israel in order to prevent a peace deal; and Congress’s contempt for the Arab Spring, since it has brought down friendly dictators and advanced freedom and liberty for the people.

MP3 here. (17:51)

Dr. Stephen Zunes is a Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of San Francisco, where he chairs the program in Middle Eastern Studies. A native of North Carolina, Professor Zunes received his PhD. from Cornell University, his M.A. from Temple University and his B.A. from Oberlin College. He has previously served on the faculty of Ithaca College, the University of Puget Sound, and Whitman College. He serves as a senior policy analyst for the Foreign Policy in Focus project of the Institute for Policy Studies, an associate editor of Peace Review, and chair of the academic advisory committee for the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_30_wheeler.mp3]

Blogger Marcy Wheeler discusses the NY Times puff piece article on President Obama’s secret kill list; the government’s fuzzy math in calculating civilian casualties from drone strikes; assassinating the bakers who may or may not sell bread to the Taliban; journalists (a.k.a. “terrorist sympathizers”) who dare gather information on drone strike casualties; more evidence that counterterrorism advisor John Brennan is a liar; how the US helped create the AQAP threat in Yemen; why the Abdulmutallab “Underwear Bomber” story still doesn’t make sense; the US’s bad intelligence and untrustworthy partners in the Middle East; and how secretive drone strikes and Special Forces raids allow the president to wage war on the sly.

MP3 here. (23:00)

Blogger Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, grew up bi-coastally, starting with every town in New York with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, California, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal. Since then, she has lived in Western Massachusetts, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Ann Arbor, and — just recently — Western Michigan.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to Michigan; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton” — a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging. (Oh, and I hear Amazon still has the book for sale.)

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy met her husband Mr. emptywheel playing Ultimate Frisbee, though she retired from the sport several years ago. Marcy, Mr. EW and their dog — McCaffrey the MilleniaLab — live in a loft in a lovely urban hellhole.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_25_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy, discusses his article “US Hard Line in Failed Iran Talks Driven by Israel;” the deal-breaking US positions on sanctions relief and Iran’s Fordow enrichment facility; the US’s tried-and-true model for justifying military action, from Kosovo to Iraq, that works by sabotaging any diplomatic alternatives; the Obama administration’s seeming opposition to war with Iran; and how the neoconservatives won over all the ultra-rich philanthropists.

MP3 here. (21:04)

Gareth Porter is an investigative historian and journalist specializing in U.S. national security policy. The paperback edition of his latest book, Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam, was published in 2006.

Adam Morrow

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_29_morrow.mp3]

IPS News journalist Adam Morrow discusses his article “From Mubarak to Worse;” the final two candidates – a Muslim Brother and a former Mubarak official – in Egypt’s presidential run-off election; why Egyptians are more concerned with Islamic dress codes than Gaza policy or foreign meddling; the Muslim Brotherhood’s history of cooperation with the West; Egypt’s unfinished constitution; and why Egypt’s socialist/leftist groups haven’t had any electoral success.

MP3 here. (16:05)

Adam Morrow writes for Inter Press Service News Agency.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_30_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the going-nowhere P5+1 Iran talks; the domestic political considerations that influence Obama’s foreign policy decisions; how US Iran Policy is Intended to Leave Open ‘Avenues for Regime Change;'” why the US and Israel won’t tolerate Iran’s nuclear breakout capability (even though nearly all nations with civilian nuclear programs have one); and the contradictory media reports on Syria’s Houla massacre.

MP3 here. (19:56)