Kelley B. Vlahos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_15_vlahos.mp3]

Regular Antiwar.com columnist Kelley B. Vlahos discusses her article “The CIA and Polio in Pakistan;” how Dr. Shakil Afridi set up a fake immunization campaign to help the CIA in their effort to pinpoint Osama bin Laden’s location in Abbottabad; how the immunization ruse further undermined public confidence in vaccinations in one of the last countries with Polio cases; and the reality of life in an iron lung.

MP3 here. (20:04)

Kelley Beaucar Vlahos, a Washington, D.C.-based freelance writer, is a longtime political reporter for FoxNews.com and a contributing editor at The American Conservative. She is also a Washington correspondent for Homeland Security Today magazine. Her Twitter account is @KelleyBVlahos.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_08_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the corrupt narco-state of Afghanistan; the Russian mafia’s control of heroin distribution to Western Europe; former CIA Deputy Director for Operations Jose Rodriguez’s torture defense (and book promotion) on the talk-show circuit; Secretary of State Clinton’s promotion of internet freedom while President Obama wages cyber warfare on Iran and plans an internet “kill switch;” Obama’s dictatorial powers under the National Defense Resources Preparedness Executive Order; and how government surveillance has increased so dramatically since “Total Information Awareness” was halted by Congress in 2003.

MP3 here. (20:15)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

John Glaser

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_11_kpfk_glaser.mp3]

John Glaser, Assistant Editor at Antiwar.com, discusses the government’s premature bragging about foiling another underwear bomber terrorist plot – which became embarrassing when news broke about the bomber’s CIA/Saudi connection; Hillary Clinton’s well-founded doubts about arming Syria’s rebellion, whose ranks include al-Qaeda members and suicide bombers; why a “safe zone” in Syria is about as stupid as the “no fly zone” in Libya – and just as sure to start a larger war; the media’s disinterest in Libya since Gaddafi’s death and “mission accomplished,” even though human rights violations abound; the continued crackdown against peaceful protesters in Bahrain, though not even Al Jazeera finds it newsworthy; and how the US’s Middle East policy is geared toward maintaining a regional foothold and containing Iran, not exporting democracy.

MP3 here. (27:27)

 

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_09_wheeler.mp3]

Blogger Marcy Wheeler discusses the CIA double-agent at the center of the latest underwear bomb plot; Saudi Arabia’s role in infiltrating AQAP and providing the US with intelligence inside Yemen; why alleged bombmaker Ibrahim al-Asiri hasn’t been captured or killed yet, despite having his high-profile plots foiled three times already; Congressman Peter King’s investigation of media coverage on the CIA’s double-agent – since honest journalism “may jeopardize the war on terror;” the Yemeni government’s incentive to inflate the threat of Al-Qaeda terrorism; why the Saudi government might be pretending to fight AQAP while surreptitiously pursuing a private agenda that has nothing to do with US security; and how out-of-control US government secrecy makes investigative journalism very difficult.

MP3 here. (22:11)

Blogger Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, grew up bi-coastally, starting with every town in New York with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, California, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal. Since then, she has lived in Western Massachusetts, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Ann Arbor, and — just recently — Western Michigan.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to Michigan; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton” — a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging. (Oh, and I hear Amazon still has the book for sale.)

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy met her husband Mr. emptywheel playing Ultimate Frisbee, though she retired from the sport several years ago. Marcy, Mr. EW and their dog — McCaffrey the MilleniaLab — live in a loft in a lovely urban hellhole.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_08_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses his article “Iran’s Tactical Strength;” the conclusion of US war simulations studying Iran’s likely retaliation to an Israeli air strike; why the media and government officials from the US and Israel are suddenly less hawkish on Iran; the decade-long scare campaign that Hezbollah sleeper cells are all over the Western Hemisphere; the unlikely story of the CIA capturing explosives-ready underwear in Yemen, which supposedly prevented a terrorist attack; the US government’s contradictory claims that Al Qaeda is decimated, yet also a rapidly expanding threat justifying more foreign interventions; and why the events of 9/11 deserve a complete reexamination.

MP3 here. (39:40)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_02_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses former #3 CIA boss Jose Rodriguez’s defense of torture and the destruction of interrogation videos (that he ordered); Rodriguez’s claim that the tapes were shredded to protect CIA agents from Al Qaeda retribution, not to coverup criminal acts; how the Department of Justice erodes the rule of law by failing to prosecute former officials bragging about their crimes on television; and the systemic torture practiced by US officials that extended far beyond waterboarding.

MP3 here. (19:48)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_01_27_wheeler.mp3]

Blogger Marcy Wheeler discusses the DC Circuit court’s rejection of Guantanamo prisoner Adnan Farhan Abd Al Latif‘s successful habeas corpus petition; the DOD’s 2006 determination that Latif should be released; the DC court’s assertion that government intelligence must be presumed valid, essentially gutting habeas rights and openly defying the SCOTUS Boumediene decision; the DOJ’s prosecution of former CIA officer John Kiriakou, building on Obama’s record setting witch-hunt of government whistleblowers; and the novel tactic of charging whistleblowers under the Espionage Act (it wasn’t done before because “it’s stupid”).

MP3 here. (19:55)

Blogger Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, grew up bi-coastally, starting with every town in New York with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, California, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal. Since then, she has lived in Western Massachusetts, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Ann Arbor, and — just recently — Western Michigan.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to Michigan; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton” — a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging. (Oh, and I hear Amazon still has the book for sale.)

Marcy has been blogging full time since 2007. She’s known for her live-blogging of the Scooter Libby trial, her discovery of the number of times Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was waterboarded, and generally for her weedy analysis of document dumps.

Marcy met her husband Mr. emptywheel playing Ultimate Frisbee, though she retired from the sport several years ago. Marcy, Mr. EW and their dog — McCaffrey the MilleniaLab — live in a loft in a lovely urban hellhole.

 

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_01_19_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses his article “What War With Iran Might Look Like;” the many layers of obfuscation (like peeling an onion) in the Jundallah/CIA/Mossad frame-up; President Bush’s “absolutely ballistic” response to Israeli operatives, posing as CIA officers, recruiting Jundullah agents to commit terrorist acts in Iran; and why the Obama administration is powerless to stop Israel from starting a war with Iran (and dragging the US along with it).

MP3 here. (19:40)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_01_18_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the Israeli Mossad’s false flag operation that made the CIA appear responsible for terrorist attacks inside Iran; using Jundullah to assassinate Iranian nuclear scientists to provoke a military response – not set back their nuclear program; how terrorist attacks marginalize Iranian political moderates and make diplomatic negotiations with the US impossible; and the predictable nationalistic “blowback” response of Iranian students, who are defiantly switching majors to nuclear science.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_21_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the CIA agents “rolled up” in Iran and Lebanon because of sloppy tradecraft (like regularly meeting at a Beirut Pizza Hut); clarifying the CIA terms “officer,” “agent,” and “asset;” the Iranian agents killed from ill-conceived CIA mailing practices during Giraldi’s tenure (though he learned about it in the newspaper); how the purging of US intelligence assets could help the Iran war propaganda campaign; and why a Libyan-style regime change could soon come to Syria.

MP3 here. (21:17)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_18_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses a couple alternative explanations of the Iranian assassination plot, both more sensible than the official government story; why Iran would essentially commit national suicide by conducting a terrorist attack in Washington DC; the system of incentives for law enforcement agents and informants to play up any terrorism angle; prosecuting the CIA officials who lied to National Security Advisor Richard Clarke, in order to get the big fish in the Bush administration; and how the mainstream media is failing (on purpose) to expose government lies and give Americans credible information.

MP3 here. (19:48)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

 

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_14_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, member of Veterans For Peace and former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses his article “Petraeus’s CIA Fuels Iran Murder Plot;” fixing the facts around the policy yet again, this time to start a war with Iran; why you can bet Petraeus’s first objective as CIA director was to make analysts stop honest assessments of the failing Afghanistan War, and start saying “the surge worked;” how Obama’s advisors are limiting his options and trapping him into a war with Iran; and why you should get out and protest government wrongdoing (there’s plenty to choose from).

MP3 here. (33:39)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_26_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses his recent articles “Injudicious Judge Dismisses Civil Libertarians” and “Brennan Does Yemen;” why rising tensions in Pakistan may result in US forces being kicked out – if they will leave; how the AUMF is used to justify warfare anywhere, with nearly anyone; how the CIA transformed from a civilian intelligence gathering/analyzing agency into yet another clandestine military outfit; and the competing military doctrines of politicians and generals, respectively: waging a multi-front, constantly expanding, never-ending global war and fighting more limited engagements that can be defined, won, and used for self-promotion.

MP3 here. (20:07)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_13_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the CIA’s failure to disclose information on the 9/11 hijackers living in San Diego (before the deed) to the FBI; why government incompetence and inefficiency can explain events (like 9/11) that seem to be deliberately planned or allowed to happen; the major implications for US alliances over a possible veto on the Palestinian state UN resolution; why Israel is worried about (potential) Palestine’s creation along 1967 borders, as well as access to the ICC and UNESCO; and declining relations between Israel and Turkey.

MP3 here. (18:12)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_07_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the two recent Washington Post articles on the growth and evolution of CIA and JSOC; how the creation of “career track” government jobs gave new life to the unsuccessful drone war in Pakistan; CIA analysts who doubt the wisdom of policy decisions but lack the opportunity to officially object; the logic of the “permanent war state;” and why we can expect future blowback from US efforts to befriend Libya’s jihadists.

MP3 here. (20:09)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_08_25_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses the AP news story about the CIA/NYPD joint venture into “mapping” minority neighborhoods – essentially domestic spying; rendering moot the prohibitions on domestic CIA intelligence gathering and military law enforcement; why recruiting government informants through blackmail is a sign of creeping totalitarianism; why Americans are not protected by the rule of law, so long as the government can ignore it at will; and why the real threat to liberty is not from terrorists abroad, but from government at home.

MP3 here. (24:55)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Jason Leopold

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_08_11_leopold.mp3]

Investigative reporter Jason Leopold discusses his article “Former Counterterrorism Czar Accuses Tenet, Other CIA Officials of Cover-Up” about Richard Clarke essentially blaming the CIA for failing to prevent the 9/11 terrorist attack by withholding the identities and whereabouts of two eventual hijackers; likely CIA efforts to recruit the hijackers and gain a desperately-wanted foothold inside al-Qaeda; the televised interview of Clarke by filmmakers John Duffy and Ray Nowosielski on Colorado Public Television; and information on Richard Blee, the barely-known replacement of Michael Scheuer at the CIA’s Alec Station (bin Laden unit).

MP3 here. (19:32)

Jason Leopold is an investigative reporter and the Deputy Managing Editor of Truthout. His in-depth coverage includes the US Attorney firing scandal, the leak of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame Wilsion and the Bush administration’s torture program. He is a two-time winner of the Project Censored award for his investigative work on Halliburton and Enron, and in March 2008, was awarded the Thomas Jefferson award by The Military Religious Freedom Foundation for a series of stories on the rise of Christian fundamentalism in the US military.

Leopold also received the Dow Jones Newswires Journalist of the Year Award in 2001 for his reporting on Enron and the California energy crisis. He has worked as an editor and reporter at the Los Angeles Times and was Los Angeles bureau chief of Dow Jones Newswires. He is the author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, News Junkie, a memoir.

Jeremy Scahill

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_07_14_scahill.mp3]

Jeremy Scahill, author of Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army, discusses his article “The CIA’s Secret Sites in Somalia” at The Nation; why Somalia’s very weak central government would quickly fall to Al Shabab without support from the US and African Union; the latest discovered secret CIA prison/training facility “black site” in Mogadishu; a reminder that US intervention didn’t start yesterday, and that previous efforts have led to the disaster unfolding today; why drone strikes should be considered “terrorist attacks” just like suicide bombs are; and the fickle nature of supposedly pro-government Somali forces (who could well be enemies of the US at a later time).

MP3 here. (21:58)

Jeremy Scahill, a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute, is the author of the bestselling Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army, published by Nation Books. He is an award-winning investigative journalist and correspondent for the national radio and TV program Democracy Now!. You can read his blog on TheNation.com here.

Laura Pitter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_07_12_pitter.mp3]

Laura Pitter, counterterrorism advisor in Human Rights Watch’s Terrorism and Counterterrorism Program, discusses the HRW report “Getting Away With Torture;” why the Bush administration should be criminally investigated for its torture program; giving compensation to torture victims who cannot bring suit in court due to state secrets privilege; the illegality of holding prisoners incommunicado in “black sites,” even if they are otherwise treated humanely; why federal courts are more fair and efficient than military commissions; and why Spanish courts may begin torture investigations anew, after John Durham’s long investigation of CIA misconduct concluded that only 2 of over 100 cases should be prosecuted.

MP3 here. (20:54)

Laura Pitter, counterterrorism advisor in Human Rights Watch’s Terrorism and Counterterrorism Program, monitors, analyzes and writes on US counterterrorism policies. Prior to joining Human Rights Watch, Laura was a journalist, human rights advocate, and attorney who practiced in both the public and private sectors.

She was a reporter during the war in Bosnia where she wrote for Time Magazine and Reuters News Agency among other media outlets. Following the war she worked for the United Nations in both Bosnia and post Sept. 11-Afghanistan as a protection and political affairs officer. After Afghanistan, Laura practiced law for eight years, first with the Legal Aid Society and later with a boutique law firm, both in New York. Laura holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Santa Barbara, a master’s in international affairs from Columbia University, and a law degree from the University of San Francisco.

Marcy Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_07_08_wheeler.mp3]

Marcy Wheeler, blogging as “emptywheel” at firedoglake.com, discusses the trial of former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling for allegedly spilling the beans on Operation “Merlin,” a foolhardy attempt to pass bogus nuclear weapons plans to Iran; the return of federal prosecutor William Welch, who managed to botch both the Ted Stevens and Thomas Drake trials; and the government’s pursuit of NY Times journalist James Risen for his investigative work on warrantless wiretapping and the Bush administration’s push for war with Iran.

MP3 here. (19:55)

Marcy Wheeler, a.k.a. emptywheel, blogs at firedoglake.com. Marcy grew up bicoastally, starting with every town in NY with an IBM. Then she moved to Poway, CA, home of several participants in the Duke Cunningham scandal.  Since then, she has lived in Western MA, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, and finally–for the last 12 years–Ann Arbor.

She got a BA from Amherst College, where she spent much of her time on the rugby pitch. A PhD program in Comparative Literature brought her to MI; she got the PhD but decided academics was not her thing. Her research, though, was on a cool journalistic form called the “feuilleton”–a kind of conversational essay that was important to the expansion of modern newspapers in much of the rest of the world. It was pretty good preparation to become a blogger, if a PhD can ever be considered training for blogging.

After leaving academics, Marcy consulted for the auto industry, much of it in Asia. But her contract moved to Asia, along with most of Michigan’s jobs, so she did what anyone else would do. Write a book, and keep blogging.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_27_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “Why US and NATO Fed Detainees to Afghan Torture System;” ambiguous statements from Secretary of Defense Robert Gates on the July Afghanistan drawdown; perpetuating failure with the “long war” doctrine; how Gen. David Petraeus’s new role as CIA chief puts a damper on civilian oversight of military operations; the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden (sorry for the extreme delay in posting interviews the past couple weeks); and how the Afghan National Directorate of Security – given prisoners by US and NATO forces for “interrogation” – released bribe-paying high-ranking Taliban officials.

MP3 here. (21:46)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Charles Featherstone

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_04_featherstone.mp3]

Charles Featherstone, regular writer at LewRockwell.com, discusses his disagreement with Eric Margolis‘s doubts about the legitimacy of Libya’s (initial) uprising; how tribal groups within modern states (like Saudi Arabia and Libya) function as “intermediate institutions” that provide a protective barrier between individuals and unbridled state power; how tribal negotiations with Gaddafi could have prevented a Benghazi massacre – without Western intervention; why the CIA’s obvious infiltration of Libya’s rebels does not mean the whole uprising was a covert operation; looking ahead to nation building in yet another country without even rudimentary civil institutions; and a prediction that Israel will step back from the brink of an “extermination” solution to the Palestinian problem.

MP3 here. (17:39)

Charles H. Featherstone is a seminarian, essayist and songwriter currently living in Chicago. He writes regularly for LewRockwell.com.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_17_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses CIA contractor Raymond Davis’s release from Pakistani custody after his “blood money” check cleared; the cheap and easy restitution for US killing in third world countries (aka: “Sorry about that, kid. Here’s $1500); how Col. Gaddafi’s tenacious hold on power has surprised many of his critics; how Obama’s reluctance to be “The Decider” has decreased US leverage in foreign policy negotiations; and the National Endowment for Democracy’s watchful eye on ME/NA revolutions.

MP3 here. (19:51)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_28_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the threat of US military intervention in Libya, and why it shouldn’t happen; how the overweening National Endowment for Democracy screws up political revolutions all over the world; how successful and (relatively) peaceful Mideast uprisings against tyrants undermine the violent fundamentalism promoted by al Qaeda; the US sweating bullets about CIA employee Raymond Davis spilling the beans to his Pakistani captors; the weak case for Davis’s diplomatic immunity; and why Pakistan’s government may fall if it fails to prosecute and convict Davis, in the face of repeated US calls for his release.

MP3 here. (21:55)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Stephen Webster

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_22_webster.mp3]

Stephen Webster, Senior Editor at RawStory.com, discusses why Libyan leader Muammer Gaddafi will either be deposed or killed within the next several days; the spectacle of Gaddafi’s incoherent, angry and bizarre speech; how the New York Times agreed – yet again – to withhold information at the White House’s request, this time about accused murderer Raymond Davis‘s CIA employment; how US demands for Davis’s release could lead to a popular uprising in Pakistan or war; and Iran’s provocative – but hardly threatening – naval transit through the Suez Canal.

MP3 here. (22:36)

Stephen C. Webster is Senior Editor at RawStory.com

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_15_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the importance of National Intelligence Estimates in determining US foreign policy and war-making abilities; how the Afghanistan NIE allows the military to measure their own success, leaving out a CIA assessment of the supposedly diminishing numbers of Taliban; debunking the military’s “taking the fight to the enemy” explanation for increased attacks; Gen. McChrystal’s well-reasoned “insurgent math;” and why Gen. Petraeus is more concerned with his public image than any particular military strategy, including COIN.

MP3 here. (20:26)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_09_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses the declassified FBI document that details Israeli infiltration of Pennsylvania’s NUMEC nuclear plant in the 1960s; how NUMEC’s “abnormal” losses of nuclear material were in fact diversions of highly enriched uranium to Israel’s nuclear weapons program; the renewed (and increasingly effective) effort to free Jonathan Pollard, even though the scope and damage of his spy ring remains shrouded in mystery; how US aid to Israel violates the Symington Amendment; and why we should know the identity of “Mega” in 43 years or less.

MP3 here. (20:12)

Grant F. Smith is the author of Spy Trade: How Israel’s Lobby Undermines America’s Economy, America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government and Foreign Agents: The American Israel Public Affairs Committee from the 1963 Fulbright Hearings to the 2005 Espionage Scandal. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses his week long tour of Poland, home of a “black site” secret CIA prison, during which he tried to convince the Polish government to accept Guantanamo prisoners who can’t be released to their home countries (for fear of torture); the prison’s ignominious history as “a Soviet-era compound once used by German intelligence in World War II;” the difficulty in getting information from foreign governments complicit in the CIA’s rendition and torture program; how former US officials traveling abroad risk criminal indictments; and the secret CIA prison in Romania that remains…secret.

MP3 here. (24:20)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and writes an eponymous blog. He directed the documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo.

Jeff Stein

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_stein.mp3]

Jeff Stein, SpyTalk columnist for the Washington Post, discusses how Jane “Israeli Asset” Harman’s resignation from Congress will cost the CIA a staunch ally; the 2009 Harman wiretap scandal allegedly involving Haim Saban, Alberto Gonzales, Nancy Pelosi, warrantless wiretapping and the House Intelligence Committee chairmanship; how Harman’s flippant “foot race challenge” to Stein turned the scandal into a sideshow that quickly disappeared from media coverage; and why a news story unflattering to AIPAC isn’t likely to get traction in US media.

MP3 here. (12:43)

SpyTalk columnist Jeff Stein is a longtime investigative reporter specializing in U.S. intelligence, defense and foreign policy issues. An Army Intelligence case officer in Vietnam, Stein has authored three highly regarded books and has been a frequent contributor to periodicals ranging from Esquire,Vanity Fair, GQ and Playboy to The New Republic, The Nation and The Christian Science Monitor. He also appears frequently on television and radio as an analyst on national security issues. In the 1980s, he was deputy foreign editor at UPI.

Until late 2009 Stein worked at Congressional Quarterly, where he launched the online CQ/Homeland Security daily, served as National Security editor and created SpyTalk.

Coleen Rowley

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_02_rowley.mp3]

Coleen Rowley, retired FBI agent and 9/11 whistleblower, discusses the cycle of intelligence sharing, from pre-9/11 inter-agency competitive secrecy, to post-9/11 information overload, and back to clamming up again (post-WikiLeaks); why, despite the greatly expanded national security state, the only successes in thwarting actual terrorism have come from vigilant bystanders; Sibel Edmonds’ incredible account of another FBI linguist’s meetings with a former SAVAK chief, where he steadfastly warned of an imminent attack by bin-Laden led Kamikaze pilots in major US cities in 2001; and the 9/11 Commission’s failure to mention any of this, or the three Qatari men conducting surveillance for the 9/11 hijackings – who, as revealed by WikiLeaks, are still being pursued by the FBI.

MP3 here. (29:03)

Coleen Rowley grew up in a small town in northeast Iowa. She obtained a B.A. degree in French from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa and then attended the College of Law at the University of Iowa. She graduated with honors in 1980 and passed the Iowa Bar Exam that summer.

In January of 1981, Ms. Rowley was appointed as a Special Agent with the FBI and initially served in the Omaha, Nebraska and Jackson, Mississippi Divisions. In 1984, she was assigned to the New York Office and for over six years worked on Italian-organized crime and Sicilian heroin drug investigations. During this time, Ms. Rowley also served three separate temporary duty assignments in the Paris, France Embassy and Montreal Consulate.

In 1990, Ms. Rowley was transferred to Minneapolis where she assumed the duties of Chief Division Counsel, which entailed oversight of the Freedom of Information, Forfeiture, Victim-Witness and Community Outreach Programs as well as providing regular legal and ethics training to FBI Agents of the Division and additional outside police training.

In May of 2002, Ms. Rowley brought several of the pre 9/11 lapses to light and testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee on some of the endemic problems facing the FBI and the intelligence community. Ms. Rowley’s memo to FBI Director Robert Mueller in connection with the Joint Intelligence Committee’s Inquiry led to a two-year-long Department of Justice Inspector General investigation. She was one of three whistleblowers chosen as Person of the Year by TIME magazine.

In April 2003, following an unsuccessful and highly criticized attempt to warn the Director and other administration officials about the dangers of launching the invasion of Iraq, Ms. Rowley stepped down from her (GS-14) legal position to resume her position as a (GS-13) FBI Special Agent. She retired from the FBI at the end of 2004 and now speaks publicly to various groups, ranging from school children to business/professional/civic groups, on two different topics: ethical decision-making and “balancing civil liberties with the need for effective investigation.”

Ms. Rowley authored a chapter in a book published in 2004 by the Milton Eisenhower Foundation entitled, Patriotism, Democracy and Common Sense: Restoring America’s Promise at Home and Abroad. She is also now an avid blogger on the Huffington Post.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_01_28_kpfk_giraldi.mp3]

This interview is excerpted from the KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles broadcast of January 28th. The original is available here.

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the beginning of the end of Hosni Mubarak’s rule in Egypt; the uncertain political roles of Mohamed El Baradei and the Muslim Brotherhood; mixed messages from the US government (which must balance lip service for “democracy” with an Israel-centric foreign policy); how the large, disaffected youth populations in many Arab countries energize revolutionary movements; Obama’s fanciful SOTU speech that wildly diverged from reality; the CIA-Egypt partnership in “extraordinary renditions” that dates back to the 1980s, at least; and how commodity price increases have the potential to foment popular unrest in Western countries.

MP3 here. (30:11)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Jason Ditz

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_01_18_ditz.mp3]

Jason Ditz, managing news editor at Antiwar.com, discusses Ehud Barak’s decision to abandon the sinking ship that is Israel’s Labor party; the departure of IDF chief Gabi Ashkenazi, one of the few Israeli government officials to oppose an Iran offensive; why the West may be completely wrong about Mahmoud Ahmadinejad; and the prosecution of former CIA officer Jeffrey Alexander Sterling for telling James Risen that the CIA gave Iran nuclear blueprints.

MP3 here. (19:55)

Jason Ditz is the managing news editor at Antiwar.com.

Coleen Rowley

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_01_13_rowley.mp3]

Coleen Rowley, retired FBI agent and 9/11 whistleblower, discusses the recent COINTELPRO-style government infiltration of a peaceful activist group; planned MLK day protests at FBI Washington headquarters and Quantico Marine base in support of Bradley Manning; how the government’s overreaction to WikiLeaks has led to a culture of paranoia, including a memo warning of “insider threats” and suspiciously grumpy employees; how the expansive national security state sacrifices our civil liberties while justifying its bureaucratic existence; and why Manning’s detainment conditions are excessively severe, especially for a nonviolent man who hasn’t been convicted of anything.

MP3 here. (28:44)

Coleen Rowley grew up in a small town in northeast Iowa. She obtained a B.A. degree in French from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa and then attended the College of Law at the University of Iowa. She graduated with honors in 1980 and passed the Iowa Bar Exam that summer.

In January of 1981, Ms. Rowley was appointed as a Special Agent with the FBI and initially served in the Omaha, Nebraska and Jackson, Mississippi Divisions. In 1984, she was assigned to the New York Office and for over six years worked on Italian-organized crime and Sicilian heroin drug investigations. During this time, Ms. Rowley also served three separate temporary duty assignments in the Paris, France Embassy and Montreal Consulate.

In 1990, Ms. Rowley was transferred to Minneapolis where she assumed the duties of Chief Division Counsel, which entailed oversight of the Freedom of Information, Forfeiture, Victim-Witness and Community Outreach Programs as well as providing regular legal and ethics training to FBI Agents of the Division and additional outside police training.

In May of 2002, Ms. Rowley brought several of the pre 9/11 lapses to light and testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee on some of the endemic problems facing the FBI and the intelligence community. Ms. Rowley’s memo to FBI Director Robert Mueller in connection with the Joint Intelligence Committee’s Inquiry led to a two-year-long Department of Justice Inspector General investigation. She was one of three whistleblowers chosen as Person of the Year by TIME magazine.

In April 2003, following an unsuccessful and highly criticized attempt to warn the Director and other administration officials about the dangers of launching the invasion of Iraq, Ms. Rowley stepped down from her (GS-14) legal position to resume her position as a (GS-13) FBI Special Agent. She retired from the FBI at the end of 2004 and now speaks publicly to various groups, ranging from school children to business/professional/civic groups, on two different topics: ethical decision-making and “balancing civil liberties with the need for effective investigation.”

Ms. Rowley authored a chapter in a book published in 2004 by the Milton Eisenhower Foundation entitled, Patriotism, Democracy and Common Sense: Restoring America’s Promise at Home and Abroad. She is also now an avid blogger on the Huffington Post.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_29_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses the likely CIA involvement in the 2009 Jundallah suicide bombing that killed several Revolutionary Guards officers and disrupted promising negotiations on an Iranian LEU fuel-swap deal; how the (predictable) Iranian backtracking after the terrorist attack gave the US a pretext to end talks and push for further sanctions; why we should expect whistleblowers to leak contradictory information if the 2010 Iran NIE reverses the previous estimate and provides justification for a war with Iran; how US diplomacy and talk of giving sanctions “time to work” and are just pretenses that lead to the endgame (desired by Israel) of regime change; why Israel – for the benefit of all parties – must negotiate a settlement for a Palestinian state based on 1967 borders; the connection between the 2004 Blackwater massacre in Fallujah and Israel’s assassination of Hamas founder Ahmed Yassin; and why nobody believes Obama, if given a sudden ultimatum from Netanyahu, will have the fortitude to forbid an Israeli airstrike on Iran.

MP3 here. (41:21)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_01_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the theory that WikiLeaks is carrying out the agenda of a foreign power, the State Department engaging in CIA-style espionage, the US/Israeli 5-part plan for regime change in Iran and why Bradley Manning‘s (alleged) exposure of government-gone-wild is laudable but should be prosecuted.

MP3 here. (18:05)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Gary Leupp

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_11_17_leupp.mp3]

Gary Leupp, Professor of History at Tufts University and CounterPunch contributing writer, discusses the very confusing Yemeni toner cartridge bomb story as told by the mainstream media, the lack of agreement even among heads of state on the plot’s most basic details, why Yemen is far more concerned with internal domestic conflicts than an al-Qaeda presence, speculation that former Guantanamo prisoner Jabir al-Fayti – who supposedly tipped off the Saudis about the packages – is a double agent, the nonexistent investigation into who (allegedly) stole the identity of the woman whose name was used to mail the packages and why this likely false flag operation could be part of a turf war between the CIA and JSOC.

MP3 here. (19:38)

Gary Leupp is Professor of History at Tufts University, and holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Religion. He is the author of Servants, Shophands and Laborers in in the Cities of Tokugawa Japan; Male Colors: The Construction of Homosexuality in Tokugawa Japan; and Interracial Intimacy in Japan: Western Men and Japanese Women, 1543-1900. He is also a contributor to CounterPunch.org.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_11_12_kpfk_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the very-delayed 2010 National Intelligence Estimate on Iran, the clouding of Iran’s clear NPT right to uranium enrichment for civilian nuclear power with talk about ambiguous “breakout” capabilities, the US rejection of Iran’s fair 3-party uranium swap proposal with Turkey and Brazil, how the constantly moving US diplomatic goalposts make it clear Iran’s nuclear program will never be tolerated and the warm Washington welcome for members of FBI-designated terrorist group MEK.

MP3 here. (27:47)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

James Bamford

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_11_12_bamford.mp3]

James Bamford, author of The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America, discusses the National Security Agency’s surveillance infrastructure, how the 2008 FISA Amendments Act eliminated any meaningful oversight or accountability for wiretapping, Obama’s broken promise to oppose retroactive telecom lawsuit immunity, the Catch-22 of surveillance legal challenges where a litigant can’t sue without evidence of illegal wiretapping but all such records are classified and unobtainable, the Israeli companies that provide software (alleged to contain backdoor access) and hardware to the NSA, the 9/11 Commission’s failure to mention or investigate the NSA and how turf war jealousies (and not legal prohibitions) prevented intelligence agencies from sharing information that would have prevented the 9/11 attacks.

MP3 here. (34:33)

James Bamford is the author of three books about the NSA and a former Investigative Producer for ABC’s World News Tonight. The Emmy nominated PBS Nova program “The Spy Factory” can be watched here.

Katherine Gallagher

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_11_10_gallagher.mp3]

Katherine Gallagher, Senior Staff Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights, discusses the disappointing end to John Durham’s multi-year investigation into CIA torture tape destruction (coinciding exactly with the expiring statute of limitations), why half-assed limited investigations may not be enough to placate European judges from prosecuting US government officials under universal jurisdiction, low expectations for Durham’s remaining preliminary investigation into “unauthorized” torture practices, the Justice Department’s shilling for unlimited executive power without judicial oversight, Attorney General Eric Holder’s inaction over Bush’s “damn right” boast of waterboarding approval despite Holder’s clear statement that waterboarding amounts to torture and the mounting evidence that the US is no longer governed by the rule of law.

MP3 here. (27:59)

Katherine Gallagher is a Senior Staff Attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR), where she focuses on holding individuals, including US and foreign government officials, and corporations, including private military contractors, accountable for serious human rights violations. Among the cases she is working on are Arar v. Ashcroft, Matar v. Dichter, Saleh v. Titan and Estate of Atban v. Blackwater.

Prior to joining CCR, she worked at the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia from 2001-2006.  Among other jobs, she has also worked as a legal advisor for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe in Kosovo and with the Special Court for Sierra Leone in Freetown. During the negotiations to establish the International Criminal Court, she worked as a member of the Women’s Caucus for Gender Justice in the International Criminal Court, to ensure that gender-based violence and discrimination are adequately addressed.

Katherine currently serves as a Vice-President on the International Board of the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), of which CCR has been a member since 2004. (For more information on FIDH, see www.fidh.org). Katherine received a joint M.A. in Journalism and Middle East Studies from New York University in 1995 and a J.D. from the City University of New York in 2000.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_22_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger’s just-declassified 1987 statement (excerpted from a still-classified 46 page declaration of damage) that called for the harsh punishment of pro-Israel spy Jonathan Pollard, how the release of Weinberger’s full declaration could substantiate allegations that Pollard’s disclosure caused the death of many CIA agents, the story of Israel’s 1954 “Lavon Affair” false flag operation in Egypt and how Israel consistently uses inside information to sabotage U.S. foreign relations with other countries.

MP3 here. (20:16)

Grant F. Smith is the author of Spy Trade: How Israel’s Lobby Undermines America’s Economy, America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government and Foreign Agents: The American Israel Public Affairs Committee from the 1963 Fulbright Hearings to the 2005 Espionage Scandal. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_18_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses the scant evidence used to justify U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan, a possible CIA destabilization campaign to weaken Pakistan and seize its nukes and why the Afghanistan “Potemkin” War continues even though everyone knows it’s a lost cause.

MP3 here. (19:58)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Reese Erlich

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_27_erlich.mp3]

Reese Erlich, author of Conversations with Terrorists: Middle East Leaders on Politics, Violence, and Empire, discusses his firsthand account of Iranian street protests following the disputed 2009 election, why the CIA will have trouble co-opting the agendas of Iran’s opposition political parties, the Western tendency to ignore the existence of moderates and focus on the most radical element in Iran (oscillating from the ayatollahs to the president) and how the 1953 coup proves that U.S. policy is to install friendly regimes of any sort while paying lip service to democratic government.

MP3 here. (14:24)

Reese Erlich is the author of The Iran Agenda: The Real Story of U.S. Policy and the Middle East Crisis, Target Iraq: What the News Media Didn’t Tell You and Dateline Havana: The Real Story of U.S. Policy and the Future of Cuba. He also produced a one-hour public radio documentary, “The Struggle for Iran.”

In June 2009 he covered the elections in Iran, when an estimated one million demonstrators marched through the streets of Iran. Previously, Erlich had traveled to Iran with the actor Sean Penn. Erlich’s photos accompanied Penn’s five-part series about the trip that appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle and later in an A&E biography of Penn.

Erlich’s career in journalism goes back more than 40 years, beginning at Ramparts, a national, investigative reporting magazine published in San Francisco, followed by a stint teaching journalism at Bay Area universities for 10 years. He is a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster and produced acclaimed radio documentaries, which have aired internationally, including “The Russia Project,” “Reaching for Peace in the Holy Land” and “Lessons from Hiroshima 60 Years Later,” all hosted by Walter Cronkite, the legendary CBS news anchor. His documentary “Children of War” was hosted by Charlayne Hunter Gault of NPR and PBS. He reports regularly for a variety of radio networks, including NPR, CBC, ABC (Australia), Radio Deutsche Welle, as well as KQED Radio News and The California Report.

His newspaper articles have appeared in numerous papers in the United States and around the world, including the Christian Science Monitor, the San Francisco Chronicle, St. Petersburg Times, The New York Times Syndicate, Dallas Morning News, and the Chicago Tribune.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_25_giraldi_donate.mp3]

Former CIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses recent Mossad intelligence operations in America based out of the Israel mission to the U.N. in New York , the one-way street intelligence sharing between the CIA and Israel, why FBI and DOJ espionage investigations never go anywhere and the evidence that Israeli agents in America had foreknowledge of 9/11.

MP3 here. (26:08)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and executive director of the Council for the National Interest. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

The Other Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_23_horton_donate.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses The Amazing Disappearing and Reappearing CIA Torture Tapes, U.S. torture by proxy in Morocco, why mosques in NYC are too ordinary to even take notice of, bogus criminal accusations against Julian Assange – who was apparently warned about “honey traps,” the vastly overstated 14 year prison sentence for bin Laden’s cook and Horton’s continuing work on the Guantanamo “Suicides” story.

MP3 here. (25:59)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Flynt Leverett

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_07_14_leverett.mp3]

Flynt Leverett, former Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, discusses how Israel is getting all its ducks in a row for a 2011-2012 attack on Iran, the lack of evidence that Iran ever had a nuclear weapons program (even prior to 2003), the unsettling prospect that the US will go to war with Iran over uranium enrichment and why the delayed release of the new Iran NIE means there is some disagreement among the intelligence agencies.

MP3 here. (18:57) Transcript below.

Flynt Leverett directs the Iran Project at the New America Foundation, where he is also a Senior Research Fellow. Additionally, he teaches at Pennsylvania State University’s School of International Affairs.

Dr. Leverett is a leading authority on the Middle East and Persian Gulf, U.S. foreign policy, and global energy affairs. From 1992 to 2003, he had a distinguished career in the U.S. government, serving as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff, and as a CIA Senior Analyst. He left the George W. Bush Administration and government service in 2003 because of disagreements about Middle East policy and the conduct of the war on terror.

Dr. Leverett’s 2006 monograph, Dealing With Tehran: Assessing U.S. Diplomatic Options Toward Iran, presented the seminal argument for a U.S.-Iranian “grand bargain”, an idea that he has developed in multiple articles and Op Eds in The New York Times, The National Interest, POLITICO, Salon, Washington Monthly, and the New America Foundation’s “Big Ideas for a New America” series.

—————

Transcript – Scott Horton interviews Flynt Leverett July 14, 2010

Scott Horton: All right, y’all, welcome back to the show. It’s Antiwar Radio, I’m Scott Horton, and our first guest on the show today is Flynt Leverett. He directs the Iran Project at the New American Foundation, where he’s also a senior research fellow, and he teaches at Pennsylvania State University School of International Affairs. He’s a leading authority on the Middle East and the Persian Gulf and global energy affairs. From 1992 to 2003 he worked for the U.S. government serving as Senior Director for Middle East Affairs at the National Security Council, on the Secretary of State’s policy planning staff, and as a senior CIA analyst. He left the Bush administration in 2003 because of disagreements about Middle East policy and the conduct of the war on terror. I think particularly Iran policy was an issue there. Welcome to the show, Flynt, how are you?

Flynt Leverett: Hi, thanks for having me.

Horton: Well thanks very much for joining us. Okay, now, I talked with Gareth Porter last week, and I asked him, “Gareth, I’m hearing all these rumors about ships headed toward Iran and all this pressure and Israel trying to work out deals with the Saudis to use their air space or maybe make some bases out in the desert, these things, and yet they just passed the new sanctions. So it seems like if there’s going to be a conflict, a military conflict with Iran, it would have to be after, you know, I don’t know, a year or so of saying, ‘Well, I guess the sanctions didn’t work. We tried everything and now there’s no choice left but war.'” And Gareth said, “Yeah, that’s right. You know, we have time. It’s not that the danger is over. But don’t panic.” And then, almost as though Bill Kristol listens to my show, which I’m sure he doesn’t –

Leverett: I’m sure he does.

Horton: Oh, yeah, right. The next day or something, they came out, a couple days later they came out and said, “We’re creating the ‘Emergency Committee for Israel.'” The emergency apparently being Iran. What’s going on here?

Leverett: Well, I think I would largely agree with Gareth in terms of the timing of development. I think the deployment of the additional carrier battle group and other assets to the Gulf, I suspect that really is more a matter of rotational arrangements and logistical scheduling. I don’t think it portends, you know, an imminent decision on the part of the United States to use force against Iran. I also think the story about the Israelis reaching agreement with the Saudis to use their air space, overfly Saudi air space, to get the targets in Iran – you know, I suspect there is a certain amount of disinformation or what some call “informational operations” going on there.

Horton: It was in the London Times.

Leverett: Which is actually a pretty frequent venue for that kind of thing.

Horton: Yeah.

Leverett: But I think that there is something afoot. My own view is that the Israelis are in all probability not gearing up to strike Iran in the near term, not tomorrow, not next week, not next month, and in fact the Israelis are constrained to some degree because their own unilateral options for attacking targets in Iran from a military standpoint are relatively limited. The amount of damage that they could do in Iran is just pretty circumscribed. And I tend to think that the Israelis are playing a much longer game here. And I think you’re right, we now have these new sanctions in place that we’re going to need to go through six months, twelve months or so living with these sanctions until everyone is willing to acknowledge that they’re not having the desired effect. And I think the Israelis are playing a game, looking at a year down the road, 18 months, maybe two years down the road, when after more and more people come on board and say sanctions aren’t working, the Iranians are continuing to develop their fuel cycle capabilities, etc. – at that point, probably around the time that President Obama is gearing up for his own reelection campaign in a serious way, the Israelis can come back and say, “Okay, now we need to do something more coercive around the Iranian problem.” I think they’re sort of softening us up for, you know, say, 18 months from now.

Horton: Well now, what did you make of Obama’s statement to the Israeli press that, I guess apparently he had just come out of one meeting or another with Netanyahu, and then told the Israeli press, when asked, that, “Oh, I don’t think there’ll be any surprises. I think that, you know, if we, if there is ever going to be a war with Iran, Netanyahu and I will arrange it together,” basically.

Leverett: I think that is, in a way, what Obama was saying in that statement. I don’t think Obama would have said it if he didn’t feel like he had some kind of understanding with Prime Minister Netanyahu that Israel is not going to take unilateral action in the near term and that Israel is not going to surprise the United States on something this important and that he’s at least going to get to have another conversation with Prime Minister Netanyahu before Israel would go down that road. I can’t imagine he would stake out that sort of position in public unless he felt he really did have that kind of understanding with Netanyahu, and I think this is part of the long game that Netanyahu and the Israelis are playing. They’re saying, in essence, “Yeah, we’ll let you see what these sanctions do. You can have time to see how these sanctions play out.” But Netanyahu has also put down markers in public that he doesn’t think the sanctions are going to work, and he’s also put down markers that, as the way he put it, “The only thing that has ever caused the Iranians to stop their nuclear program has been the perceived threat of U.S. military action,” not Israeli military action, but U.S. military action. And he’s shifting the onus, you know, if and when sanctions fail, and he thinks they probably will fail, the only thing that can really stop the Iranians is the threat of U.S. military action. And I think he’s putting all these pieces in place.

Horton: Well, which brings us back to the Emergency Committee for Israel. Is this a piece that Netanyahu is putting in place by way of Bill Kristol?

Leverett: I don’t think I would go so far as to say that Mr. Kristol and his associates are working at the direct behest of Prime Minister Netanyahu, but I’m sure that Prime Minister Netanyahu doesn’t mind the emergence of this group and I think it is going to be – there is going to be a campaign from the pro-Israel community in the United States. You know, they were very, very focused on getting the sanctions in place and AIPAC’s stated position has been, “We’re focused on getting new sanctions. We’re not urging military action for now.” And they’ve always put in that language, “for now.” But I think the next step is going to be to start hyping the threat, supposedly, that Iran poses to Israel, to start using every channel available and create new channels to drum that message home to the American public that, “Iran is bad, Iran is dangerous, Iran needs to be stopped, and in the end it’s really only the United States that can stop it.” I think you’re going to see an escalation in the delivery of that message through multiple channels from the pro-Israel community here in the United States over the next one to two years.

Horton: Okay, now, everyone who listens to this show already understands that in order for Iran to make nuclear weapons, they would have to basically grant John Bolton’s wish and withdraw from the nonproliferation treaty, kick the inspectors out of the country, and announce to the world, “We’re making nuclear bombs now.” And there is no nuclear weapons threat from Iran until at least – you know, the clock doesn’t even start ticking until the day that that happens, and so far they haven’t fallen into that trap. So, what I want to ask you, on that issue, is a little bit more of an inside baseball question, and that is that the National Intelligence Estimate from 2007 said that the Iranians halted all nuclear weapons work in 2003. And now when I talked to Gareth Porter, he says that he actually has a source who’s read the entire classified version of that NIE and that all of that assertion that there ever was a nuclear weapons program of any description is based on the forged Israeli document posing as an Iranian laptop that says that they had a bench level experiment for laser enrichment of uranium tetraflouride and a few other things that Gareth, in his words, has completely debunked as a forgery. And I guess that bumper music means we have to go out to break and you’ll have a couple of minutes to think about your answer, but I want to know whether there’s any credible evidence they ever had a nuclear weapons program before 2003 even.

Leverett: Okay.

Horton: We’ll be right back, y’all.

Horton: All right, y’all, welcome back to the show. It’s Antiwar Radio, Scott Horton. I’m talking with Flynt Leverett, former CIA analyst and National Security Council Middle East staffer expert. He and his wife keep the blog Race for Iran, at raceforiran.com. Basically we’ve been talking about the substance of the article, “Who Will Be Blamed for a U.S. Attack on Iran?” so far in the show. But before we went out to break, I was asking you, sir, whether there was any actual evidence, as opposed to forged documents created by the Mossad, that say that the Iranians ever had a nuclear program before 2003, like is sort of implied or indicated in the National Intelligence Estimate of 2007?

Leverett: Well, to the best of my knowledge, no, there is not. I say that because, you know, I haven’t been working in a classified environment for a number of years now and I certainly wouldn’t claim to know everything that the U.S. intelligence community might have.

Horton: But it’s fair to say that you would have heard, right?

Leverett: Look, my very strong impression is that we know that the Iranians have been working on, you know, a dedicated fuel cycle program focused on uranium enrichment for a long time. Could they have at some point, you know, looked into other kinds of technical or engineering problems that you would need to solve if you were actually at some point going to build a nuclear weapon? Yeah, that’s possible, but I’ve never seen what I would consider clear and convincing evidence of it. And that, you know – we have been through this once before, with regard to Iraq, where we relied on foreign intelligence services, where we didn’t have access to the primary sources, we relied on, you know, defector information. I have a sneaking suspicion that this new NIE, when it comes out, may make use of a lot of information from both defectors and from foreign intelligence services, and I think there is a real risk that we may be going down the same road that we went down with regard to intelligence, anyway, before the war in Iraq.

And from a political standpoint, if we do go to war with Iran, we are basically going to be going to war with them because they’re enriching uranium. Not because they have, as you know you posited earlier, withdrawn from the NPT and are building nuclear weapons. Not because they attacked someone. We’re going to go to war with them, if that’s the way things go, because they’re enriching uranium, and Israel is uncomfortable with that. And I think that’s a really disturbing scenario. I think it’s going to be quite bad for U.S. interests in the region if it plays out. And while there were some critics who tried to argue that we basically went to war in Iraq for the benefit of Israel, as someone who was in government in the run-up to the war with Iraq, I have to say that was not my perception, that was not my experience. But if we go to war with Iran because Iran is enriching uranium, we will basically be doing that because of Israeli discomfort over it and because the pro-Israel community here has really pushed hard to get us to take a confrontational stance toward Iran because it’s enriching uranium. And I think that’s going to be quite bad for U.S. interests if things play out that way.

Horton: Well, even with the war with Iraq, that was kind of a confluence of interests, right? I mean, Lawrence Wilkerson, Colin Powell’s aide (Powell was the first Secretary of State in the first Bush Jr. administration), he was on the show last week and said that Douglas Feith and David Wurmser both were simply acting as at least de facto agents of Israel in everything they did to get us into the war in Iraq.

Leverett: I think there were a lot of the neoconservatives who clearly were in the vanguard of pushing us to go to war in Iraq. I just think, from my own experience in January of 2002, just as I was getting ready to move from the State Department over to the White House – I was a U.S. representative at this annual conference in Herzliya, basically the annual gathering of Israel’s national security community, and there was clearly a lot of interest at that conference in sort of where the U.S. was going to go next in terms of the war on terror, and the message that I got from Israeli participants in that conference was, if the United States chose to go war in Iraq, that the thing was, Israel wasn’t going to say, “No, don’t do that,” but as far as Israel was concerned, you know, it was a much higher priority to go after Iran. In some respects, going after Iraq was the wrong country, as far as Israel was concerned. I think they would have preferred to see us really giving priority to going after Iran. That’s obviously not how things worked out.

Horton: Well, and there’s a difference too between the policies that the neoconservatives in America put first and even Ariel Sharon’s policies.

Leverett: Yes. And I think that distinction matters. And I think that the neoconservatives certainly bear, you know, a lion’s share of the blame for the debacle in Iraq, but I think that the role of Israel and of the pro-Israel community in the United States in pushing that war was not as great as some would make it out to be. But in this case, if we go to war with Iran – as I said, go to war with them, attack them, because they’re enriching uranium – we’re basically going to be doing that because of an Israeli agenda.

Horton: Okay, now, it looks like I’m not going to have a chance to ask you about the peace offer of 2003, because more important and more timely is this new NIE that you mentioned. Mark Hosenball of Newsweek says that it’s the Israeli Mossad and the German intelligence agency, I forget what it’s called –

Leverett: Yeah, the BND.

Horton: The BND, right. That they are the ones insisting that, “No, there is a nuclear weapons program in Iran,” and Hosenball said that yeah, they’re I guess in the middle of rewriting it right now. Do you know, have you heard in the wind or anything – I heard you when you said you don’t have access to classified information anymore, but do you know of any evidence that says that there’s any kind of parallel secret nuclear effort in Iran of any description, or are we simply just talking about Natanz and all their 3.6 enriched uranium laying right there?

Leverett: You know, I think Western intelligence services have been searching for years for that parallel program and there are many people who are convinced that it must exist, but to the best of my knowledge, no one has actually come up with hard evidence of a parallel program.

Horton: Is there any pushback in the CIA or the other intelligence agencies that participate in the National Intelligence Council trying to resist doing this? Because after all, even though the neocons did their part over at the Pentagon really in coming up with the talking points, the CIA took all the blame for Iraq – are they going to, you know, go ahead and roll over with the political pressure here, you think?

Leverett: I’ve heard that there is some pushback within the community, and it is striking that I think the appearance of this NIE is quite overdue at this point. It’s well past its due date, and that would seem to confirm to me the idea that there may be some disagreement.

Horton: All right. Great. Well, thanks very much for your time. Everybody, Flynt Leverett, raceforiran.com.

Leverett: Thank you very much.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_07_13_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses his updated “definitive prisoner list” for Guantanamo, how the US whisked away the real suspected terrorists to CIA black sites and used Gitmo as a catch-all and PR stunt, more reasons why torture is unjustifiable and how the Justice Department is forced to pursue terrorism charges against Yemenis who have been cleared for release.

MP3 here. (18:58)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and blogs at AndyWorthington.co.uk. His documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo is available on DVD.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_06_30_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses the hype surrounding a seemingly benign Russian spy ring in the US, the sorely needed FBI public relations boost from their apparent counter-espionage success, CIA director Leon Panetta’s disincentive for changing the 2007 Iran National Intelligence Estimate and why Iran really was pursuing a nuclear weapons program prior to 2003.

MP3 here. (25:08)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Robert Parry

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_06_16_parry.mp3]

Robert Parry, founder of ConsortiumNews.com, discusses the mainstream media’s persecution of journalist Gary Webb for daring to investigate the CIA/contra 1980s drug trafficking connection, how the empowered right wing media and associated personal-attack groups have created a generation of self-censoring and timid journalists, alternative media that can contest conventional wisdom but can’t compete with the MSM budget-wise and the recent hit pieces on classified documents leaker SPC. Bradley Manning.

MP3 here. (29:04)

Robert Parry is an investigative journalist who won the George Polk Award in 1984 for reporting on the Iran-Contra affair and uncovering Oliver North’s involvement in it. He is the founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com and author of Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush, Trick or Treason: The October Surprise Mystery and Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.

Barry Eisler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_06_15_eisler.mp3]

Barry Eisler, political thriller novelist and author of Inside Out, discusses how his previous CIA employment influenced his style of fiction writing, the degradation of US political conservatism, why the government’s response to terrorism has been more damaging than the terrorism itself and how 9/11 triggered the irrational primitive survival instincts of many Americans.

MP3 here. (18:41)

Barry Eisler spent three years in a covert position with the CIA’s Directorate of Operations, then worked as a technology lawyer and startup executive in Silicon Valley and Japan, earning his black belt at the Kodokan International Judo Center along the way. Eisler’s bestselling thrillers have won the Barry Award and the Gumshoe Award for Best Thriller of the Year, have been included in numerous “Best Of” lists, and have been translated into nearly twenty languages. Eisler lives in the San Francisco Bay Area and, when he’s not writing novels, blogs about torture, civil liberties, and the rule of law.

Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_06_08_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses Israel’s failure to uphold the mark of a (somewhat) benevolent state: a high threshold for using deadly force against civilians, Israel’s purposeful destruction of  Gaza’s economy to encourage deserters, the ignoble end of Helen Thomas’s estimable career in journalism, the “good faith” defense for CIA torturers dreamed up by Dick Cheney and justified by the OLC “torture memos,” the junk science used by doctors and psychologists to quantify acceptable pain levels inflicted on prisoners, the US departure from precedents set by Nuremberg war crimes prosecutions, a possible “Guantanamo suicides” link to CIA torture experimentation at Camp “No” and the likely existence of more CIA “interrogation” videos.

MP3 here. (42:57)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_06_07_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for Inter Press Service, discusses the CIA drone operators who believe their own jobs are counterproductive, how the Obama administration caters to domestic public opinion by extending policies that sound tough even though they are ineffective, US intelligence gathering on Iran that focuses on worst-case scenarios rather than plausible outcomes and why US military expansionism can’t keep pace with the newly radicalized populations it creates.

MP3 here. (28:54)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Nick Baumann

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_06_07_baumann.mp3]

Nick Baumann, assistant editor at Mother Jones, discusses the Physicians for Human Rights study that alleges prisoners in CIA custody were used as guinea pigs, how experimentation with torture combinations was meant to bolster the legality and effectiveness of “enhanced” interrogations, the close collaboration of doctors and psychologists with CIA torturers, revised prisoner experimentation rules in the 2006 Military Commissions Act and how government-perpetrated barbarism seems to be the new normal.

MP3 here. (17:32)

Nick Baumann is an assistant editor at Mother Jones based in their DC bureau, where he covers national politics. Nick’s writing has also appeared in The Economist, The Washington Monthly, and Commonweal.

Juan Cole

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_05_28_cole.mp3]

Juan Cole, author of Engaging the Muslim World, discusses the attack in Lahore, Pakistan against the Ahmadiyya religious minority, the propagation of conspiracy theories by the Pakistani government, Muqtada al-Sadr’s extensive community organization apparatus in Iraq and the blurred legal authority governing overlapping US civilian, CIA and military operations.

MP3 here. (27:35)

Juan Cole is the author of Engaging the Muslim World. He is a Professor of History at the University of Michigan and writes the “Informed Comment” blog at Juancole.com.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_05_21_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA and DIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses press reports that attempt to link Iran with al-Qaeda and build the case for war, the danger of a new National Intelligence Estimate on Iran based on perceived intentions rather than facts, neocon Frank Gaffney’s tireless warmongering and why Israel may have an opportunity to attack Iran in August.

MP3 here. (30:23)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and a fellow at the American Conservative Defense Alliance. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Robert Parry

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_05_12_parry.mp3]

Robert Parry, founder of ConsortiumNews.com, discusses new evidence that Ronald Reagan’s 1980 presidential campaign struck a deal with Iran to extend the hostage crisis until after the election, quid pro quo arms deals between US-proxy Israel and Iran prior to the Iran Contra scandal, the heavy CIA influence in Reagan’s campaign and subsequent administration and why George H.W. Bush was much more “in the loop” than he admits.

MP3 here. (30:51)

Robert Parry is an investigative journalist who won the George Polk Award in 1984 for reporting on the Iran-Contra affair and uncovering Oliver North’s involvement in it. He is the founder and editor of ConsortiumNews.com and author of Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush, Trick or Treason: The October Surprise Mystery and Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq.

Grant F. Smith

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_05_11_smith.mp3]

Grant F. Smith, director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C., discusses the newly declassified GAO report (from 1978) on the diversion of US nuclear material to Israel, marginal investigations and possible coverups by the FBI and CIA, prosecutorial immunity for high-profile Americans who commit crimes for Israel’s benefit, billionaire Haim Saban’s considerable influence on the Democratic Party and why LBJ’s political debt to fundraiser Abraham Feinberg probably explains his disdain for the NUMEC investigation.

MP3 here. (37:24)

Grant F. Smith is the author of Spy Trade: How Israel’s Lobby Undermines America’s Economy, America’s Defense Line: The Justice Department’s Battle to Register the Israel Lobby as Agents of a Foreign Government and Foreign Agents: The American Israel Public Affairs Committee from the 1963 Fulbright Hearings to the 2005 Espionage Scandal. He is a frequent contributor to Radio France Internationale and Voice of America’s Foro Interamericano. Smith has also appeared on BBC News, CNN, and C-SPAN. He is currently director of the Institute for Research: Middle Eastern Policy in Washington, D.C.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_05_05_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA and DIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the cloak-and-dagger media spectacle of a former CIA agent claiming to have knowledge of secret Iranian weapons, the possibility of an Israeli air strike on Iran this summer, how Israel sabotages US relations with Mideast rival countries, why it has become politically impossible for the US to rein in Israel and how the cost of maintaining US empire is the constant threat of blowback.

MP3 here. (51:48)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative and a fellow at the American Conservative Defense Alliance. He writes regularly for Antiwar.com.

Andy Worthington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_04_23_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of The Guantanamo Files, discusses his website’s Guantanamo Habeas Week event that seeks to draw attention to government torture and lawlessness, the difficult-to-determine ratio of evil/incompetence at work in the Bush administration, the arbitrary roundup of “terrorists” in Afghanistan and Pakistan following the embarrassing bin Laden Tora Bora escape, the current score card of Guantanamo Habeas hearings, scaremongering Republican politicians and the end of Congressional oversight and checks and balances.

MP3 here. (51:18)

Andy Worthington writes for Counterpunch, the Future of Freedom Foundation and Antiwar.com. He is the author of The Guantanamo Files and blogs at AndyWorthington.co.uk. His documentary movie Outside the Law: Stories From Guantanamo is available on DVD.

James Ridgeway

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_04_19_ridgeway.mp3]

James Ridgeway, Senior Washington Correspondent for Mother Jones, discusses his 2007 article “In Search of John Doe No. 2: The Story the Feds Never Told About the Oklahoma City Bombing,” the neo-Nazi movement’s 1983 plot to blow up the Murrah Federal Building, frivolous criminal charges made against ATF agent Carol Howe that prevented her from testifying for the defense at McVeigh’s trial, how the OKC bombing continues to be used as a political club against anti-government groups and how the mainstream media dismisses skeptics of conventional wisdom as “conspiracy theorists.”

MP3 here. (41:46)

James Ridgeway is Senior Washington Correspondent for Mother Jones, where he writes both articles for the magazine and a weekly web column on MotherJones.com. He also writes pieces for the Guardian and CounterPunch, and collaborates on original short videos.

Ridgeway served as Washington Correspondent for the Village Voice for more than thirty years, where he wrote the weekly “Mondo Washington” column, as well as features on national and international politics. As part of his broad-based national reporting, he became known for his writing on the American right wing, from the mainstream conservative movement to the racist far-right. He also reported on international stories, from the coup in Haiti to the democratic revolution in Eastern Europe.

Scott’s collection of OKC audio clips here.

Scott’s collection of Jesse Trentadue’s court files here.

(Host was mistaken in the interview.) Mother Jones‘ full collection of Jesse Trentadue court files here.

A previous interviews of James Ridgeway as well as the late J.D. Cash, Roger Charles, Frederic Whitehurst, Charles Key, Rick Ojeda and others on the Oklahoma City Bombing available here.

Jesse Trentadue

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_03_30_trentadue.mp3]

Jesse Trentadue discusses the journey from investigating his brother’s “suicide” in federal custody to finding the truth about the Oklahoma City bombing, a recent court setback on FOIA requests that nevertheless revealed CIA involvement in the prosecutions of Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, why the FBI must have had foreknowledge of the bombing, security video of the Murrah Building that is suspiciously edited or withheld, current Attorney General Eric Holder’s personal involvement in blocking investigations of Kenneth’s death in 1995 and how the OKC bombing is used by Democrats to browbeat militia groups and score political points.

MP3 here. (41:26) Transcript here.

Scott’s collection of OKC audio clips here.

Scott’s collection of Jesse Trentadue’s court files here.

Interviews of the late J.D. Cash, Roger Charles, James Ridgeway, Frederic Whitehurst, Rick Ojeda and others on the Oklahoma City Bombing available here.

Jesse Trentadue is an attorney in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Coleen Rowley

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_03_12_rowley.mp3]

Coleen Rowley, retired FBI agent and 9/11 whistleblower, discusses the myth that FISA restrictions (and not incompetence at FBI and CIA headquarters) prevented critical intelligence sharing prior to 9/11, CIA Director George Tenet’s August 2001 “Islamic Extremist Learns to Fly” powerpoint briefing about Zacarias Moussaoui and why the creation of the DHS and increased centralization of intelligence organizations did nothing to fix 9/11 failures.

MP3 here. (29:17)

Coleen Rowley grew up in a small town in northeast Iowa. She obtained a B.A. degree in French from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa and then attended the College of Law at the University of Iowa. She graduated with honors in 1980 and passed the Iowa Bar Exam that summer.

In January of 1981, Ms. Rowley was appointed as a Special Agent with the FBI and initially served in the Omaha, Nebraska and Jackson, Mississippi Divisions. In 1984, she was assigned to the New York Office and for over six years worked on Italian-organized crime and Sicilian heroin drug investigations. During this time, Ms. Rowley also served three separate temporary duty assignments in the Paris, France Embassy and Montreal Consulate.

In 1990, Ms. Rowley was transferred to Minneapolis where she assumed the duties of Chief Division Counsel, which entailed oversight of the Freedom of Information, Forfeiture, Victim-Witness and Community Outreach Programs as well as providing regular legal and ethics training to FBI Agents of the Division and additional outside police training.

In May of 2002, Ms. Rowley brought several of the pre 9/11 lapses to light and testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee on some of the endemic problems facing the FBI and the intelligence community. Ms. Rowley’s memo to FBI Director Robert Mueller in connection with the Joint Intelligence Committee’s Inquiry led to a two-year-long Department of Justice Inspector General investigation. She was one of three whistleblowers chosen as Person of the Year by TIME magazine.

In April 2003, following an unsuccessful and highly criticized attempt to warn the Director and other administration officials about the dangers of launching the invasion of Iraq, Ms. Rowley stepped down from her (GS-14) legal position to resume her position as a (GS-13) FBI Special Agent. She retired from the FBI at the end of 2004 and now speaks publicly to various groups, ranging from school children to business/professional/civic groups, on two different topics: ethical decision-making and “balancing civil liberties with the need for effective investigation.”

Ms. Rowley authored a chapter in a book published in 2004 by the Milton Eisenhower Foundation entitled, Patriotism, Democracy and Common Sense: Restoring America’s Promise at Home and Abroad. She is also now an avid blogger on the Huffington Post.

Larisa Alexandrovna

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_03_11_alexandrovna.mp3]

Larisa Alexandrovna, Managing Editor of investigative news for RawStory, discusses the lies told about the US push for war with Iraq in Karl Rove’s new book, how the Bush administration “fixed the facts” around their Iraq policy, US bellicosity on Iran that is meant to assuage Israel’s fears of a competing regional power, Russian geopolitical successes against lightweight US strategists, why purple fingers are not necessarily indicative of democracy, the media’s obsession with “balance” at the expense of presenting facts or telling the truth and the difficult task of assigning appropriate blame to the public and media for complicity in Iraq War lies.

MP3 here. (49:55)

Larisa Alexandrovna is an investigative journalist, covering mostly national security and intelligence. She is currently the Managing Editor of investigative news for the Raw Story. She is a contributor to Alternet, The Huffington Post, and other publications.

Ray McGovern

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_02_23_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses the successor to IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei, the rift between US intelligence agencies and the Obama administration over the 2007 Iran NIE, why Adm. Mike Mullen‘s resistance to Israel’s hawkishness on Iran appears to be weakening, how the terrorist attacks of US-supported Jundallah have disrupted diplomacy with Iran and the new poll that indicates Americans are ready to be lied into yet another war.

MP3 here. (25:47)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Nathaniel Raymond

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_15_raymond.mp3]

Nathaniel Raymond, Director of the Campaign Against Torture at Physicians for Human Rights, discusses his organization’s investigation into the alleged massacre of Taliban prisoners in 2001, suspected war criminal Abdul Rashid Dostum’s connections with the CIA and Hamid Karzai’s government that shield him from accountability, three US government investigations into the alleged massacre that were impeded by Bush officials and why Obama needs to be pressured into hastening the massacre study he initiated.

MP3 here. (20:05)

Nathaniel Raymond is the Director of the Campaign Against Torture at Physicians for Human Rights. He currently leads PHR’s inquiry into the alleged 2001 Dasht-e-Leili massacre in northern Afghanistan and worked with the PHR team that discovered the mass grave site in 2002. Raymond has coordinated PHR’s work with investigative reporters probing the Dasht-e-Leili case and led the analysis of once-secret documents that PHR’s Freedom of Information Act lawsuit forced the government to divulge. He has interviewed former senior Bush administration officials about the Dasht-e-Leili case and has coordinated the collection of data and analysis from experts on international law, satellite imagery, and military affairs.

Raymond helped write the 2008 report, Broken Laws, Broken Lives: Medical Evidence of Torture by US Personnel and Its Impact. This report contains the first comprehensive, independent medical evaluations of former detainees held at Guantánamo Bay, Abu Ghraib, and Bagram Airbase in Afghanistan. The preface to the report was written by Major General Antonio Taguba (US Army—Retired).

Since 2006, Raymond has been PHR’s lead investigator of the role of health professionals—particularly psychologists—in the design, supervision and implementation of the Bush Administration’s regime of physical and psychological torture of detainees in US custody.

Raymond has served overseas with Oxfam America in Afghanistan, the Middle East, Ethiopia and Sri Lanka. In 2005, he was one of the coordinators of the Oxfam International response to the tsunami in South Asia and also worked on the ground in Mississippi as part of Oxfam’s response to Katrina. He has published several articles on international law and mass atrocities, and contributed to the NPR programs The Connection, The Story, and This American Life.

Michael Scheuer

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_06_scheuer.mp3]

Michael Scheuer, author of Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq, discusses why he thinks the al Qaeda threat will continue to grow while the US occupies Muslim countries, why the Israel/Palestine dispute isn’t worth sacrificing American blood or treasure for, how US disengagement from the Middle East will allow Muslims to concentrate on their own considerable internal problems, humanitarian warmongers on the Left who are pushing for intervention in Africa, al Qaeda’s thorough infiltration of Yemen and why the US practice of torturing terrorism suspects should continue until more effective methods can be found.

MP3 here. (32:02)

Michael Scheuer is a 22-year veteran of the CIA and former head analyst at the CIA’s bin Laden unit. He is the author of Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq and Imperial Hubris: Why the West is Losing the War on Terror.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/10_01_05_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA and DIA officer Philip Giraldi discusses the likely circumstances that allowed a Jordanian triple-agent to kill seven CIA operatives in Afghanistan, how the CIA’s limited ability to overcome cultural and language barriers forces a dangerous reliance on foreign intelligence services, Hillary Clinton’s declaration that Yemen is now a threat to the whole world, growing foreign and domestic opposition to the 2007 National Intelligence Estimate on Iran, newly discovered problems with the Iranian documents published by the Times of London, the massive disinformation campaign to provoke wars in Iran and Yemen and why Iran’s perfectly reasonable proposal to swap low-enriched uranium for nuclear fuel rods will probably be rejected by the US.

MP3 here. (44:40)

Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, is a contributing editor to The American Conservative, fellow at the American Conservative Defense Alliance and a regular columnist for Antiwar.com.

Andrew Cockburn

[audio:http://scotthorton.org/radio/09_12_15_cockburn.mp3]

Andrew Cockburn, author of Rumsfeld: His Rise, Fall, and Catastrophic Legacy, discusses the historical and continuing US support for Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program, how the CIA and State Department stymied attempts to stop A.Q. Kahn early on and how US safeguarding efforts allow Pakistan’s nukes to be more fully and rapidly deployed.

MP3 here. (12:13)

Andrew Cockburn is the author of Rumsfeld: His Rise, Fall, and Catastrophic Legacy, One Point Safe and co-author of Out of the Ashes: The Resurrection of Saddam Hussein. He is co-producer of the documentary film American Casino and frequently writes at Counterpunch.org.

Philip Giraldi

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_11_13_giraldi.mp3]

Philip Giraldi, contributing editor at The American Conservative magazine and columnist for Antiwar.com, discusses the collusion of Congress, AIPAC and the media in agitating for war with Iran, how the media’s repetition of a single false premise shapes public opinion toward war, a proposal for an “X Street” lobby that advocates for U.S. national interests and why the CIA and the National Endowment for Democracy need curtailing.

MP3 here. (27:23)

Philip Giraldi is a former CIA and DIA counter-terrorism officer, member of the American Conservative Defense Alliance and contributing editor at The American Conservative magazine. His “Smoke and Mirrors” column is a regular feature on Antiwar.com.

Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_11_12_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the conviction of 23 CIA agents in absentia by an Italian court for their participation in extraordinary rendition, the widespread assertion of U.S. governmental immunity from the law, John Durham’s slow-brewing torture investigation for the DOJ, why the rule of law is bound to be flaunted without an engaged citizenry and recent courtroom setbacks for the state secrets privilege.

MP3 here. (28:26)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s Magazine where he writes the No Comment blog. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union.

He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Eric Margolis

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_10_29_margolis.mp3]

Internationally syndicated columnist Eric Margolis discusses the low quality of traditional media news available to U.S. audiences, how the Afghanistan election runoff is shaping up to be just as fraudulent as the first go-round, U.S. support for mujahedeen between the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan and 9/11, broad realization that even the best laid plans could end in defeat in Afghanistan and allegations that Ahmed Wali Karzai is yet another “made man” CIA asset.

MP3 here. (55:04)

Eric S. Margolis is an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist. His articles appear in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, Times of London, the Gulf Times, the Khaleej Times and Dawn. He is a regular columnist with the Quebecor Media Company and a contributor to The Huffington Post. He appears as an expert on foreign affairs on CNN, BBC, France 2, France 24, Fox News, CTV and CBC.

As a war correspondent Margolis has covered conflicts in Angola, Namibia, South Africa, Mozambique, Sinai, Afghanistan, Kashmir, India, Pakistan, El Salvador and Nicaragua. He was among the first journalists to ever interview Libya’s Muammar Khadaffi and was among the first to be allowed access to KGB headquarters in Moscow. A veteran of many conflicts in the Middle East, Margolis recently was featured in a special appearance on Britain’s Sky News TV as “the man who got it right” in his predictions about the dangerous risks and entanglements the US would face in Iraq.

Margolis is the author of War at the Top of the World: The Struggle for Afghanistan, Kashmir and Tibet and American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World.

Sibel Edmonds and John M. Cole

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_10_23edmonds_cole.mp3]

Former FBI contracttranslatorturned whistleblower Sibel Edmonds and former FBI counter-intelligence officer John M. Cole discuss State Department cooperation with the “mujahedeen” in the Central Asian Turkic countries through the Turkish military and intelligence in the time before 9/11, a State Department order to release suspicious Uzbeks and Turks after the attack, the neocons’ and realists’ joint-attempt to negotiate the invasion of Iraq from Turkey in the summer of 2001, Edmonds’s overall credibility and level of access to information in her role as “language specialist” for the FBI, espionage within the FBI and why it continues unabated, Cole’s “conservative estimate” of 125 worthwhile investigations into Israeli espionage in the U.S. which quashed by political pressure from above, Edmonds’s accusations that Richard Perle, Douglas Feith and Marc Grossman have been participating in the stealing and fencing of nuclear secrets to Turkish and Israeli agents for years, Grossman’s outing of CIA front-company “Brewster-Jennings” to a Turkish diplomat in August, 2001 – nearly 2 years before the Valerie Plame scandal – and it’s destruction as a result, the grey area where legitimate lobbying by foreign governments crosses into espionage and criminality, Cole’s call for prosecutions and Edmonds’s intention to turn her new news Website, BoilingFrogsPost.com, into a home for journalists who want to practice their craft without partisanship or political pressure.

MP3 here. (1:17:21)

Sibel Edmonds is a former FBI-contract language specialist turned whistleblower against government incompetence and corruption. The ACLU has described her as the most gagged person in U.S. history.

John M. Cole, Former Veteran Intelligence Operations Specialist, worked for 18 years in the FBI’s Counterintelligence Division as an Intelligence Operations specialist.

Melvin A. Goodman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_10_08_goodman.mp3]

Melvin Goodman, former senior Soviet analyst at the CIA, discusses Zbigniew Brzezinski’s boast that he instigated the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, Jimmy Carter’s poor decision-making skills, the U.S. habit of devoting massive resources to non-strategic battlegrounds, blowback from the post-9/11 “Axis of Evil” speech and how Gen. McChrystal is overstepping his role by giving unvetted policy speeches.

MP3 here. (30:40)

Melvin A. Goodman is senior fellow at the Center for International Policy and adjunct professor of government at Johns Hopkins University. His most recent book is Failure of Intelligence: The Decline and Fall of the CIA. From 1966 to 1990, he was senior Soviet analyst at the CIA and the Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research.

Melvin Goodman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_09_29_goodman.mp3]

Melvin Goodman, former senior Soviet analyst at the CIA, discusses the Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS) response to torture investigation naysayers, early indications that the investigation will focus on low-level operatives instead of policy makers, the Washington Post’s role as CIA apologist and how the U.S. occupation of Iraq is shaping up to be this generation’s “Forgotten War.”

MP3 here. (22:25)

Melvin A. Goodman is senior fellow at the Center for International Policy and adjunct professor of government at Johns Hopkins University. His most recent book is Failure of Intelligence: The Decline and Fall of the CIA. From 1966 to 1990, he was senior Soviet analyst at the CIA and the Department of State’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research.

Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_08_25_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the partly released CIA Inspector General’s report, how any serious torture investigation will lead to Dick Cheney, the OLC’s issuance of get-out-of-jail-free cards instead of legal advice and the debunking of Cheney’s claim that torture saves American lives.

MP3 here. (49:06)

The other Scott Horton is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s magazine and writes the blog No Comment. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union. He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Scott Horton

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_07_21_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses Attorney General Eric Holder’s likely appointment of a prosecutor to investigate torture, the common misconception that the CIA pressed the White House to allow “enhanced” interrogations, Dick Cheney’s chicken-hawk tendencies and the potential bombshell Inspector General’s report on U.S. torture practices.

MP3 here. (32:25)

The other Scott Horton both writes the No Comment blog and is a Contributing Editor for Harper’s Magazine. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union. He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Jacob Hornberger

Give up your empire or live under it

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_05_07_hornberger.mp3]

Jacob Hornberger, founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses the legal maneuvers that prevented a Supreme Court ruling on enemy combatants, the difference between regular and extraordinary rendition, how the U.S. asserts the right to detain anyone in the world indefinitely and how the mission of the CIA is incompatible with a free society.

MP3 here. (27:04)

Jacob Hornberger is a former attorney, the founder and president of The Future of Freedom Foundation and blogs at FFF.org.

Ray McGovern

The moral bankruptcy of the torture apologists

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_04_24_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses the emotional aversion CIA agents developed for their own torture tactics, the moral bankruptcy of torture apologists, the barriers to an effective Senate Intelligence Committee torture investigation and the reemergence of long time cover-up artist Warren Rudman.

MP3 here. (23:14)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Scott Horton

The meaning of the torture memos

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_04_17_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton, international human rights lawyer, professor and contributing editor at Harper’s magazine, discusses the torture memos [.pdf] released at Obama’s behest, delays in the Spanish war crimes case against Bush administration lawyers, the Orwellian torture procedures revealed in the memos and the legal precedents for prosecuting crime-enabling lawyers.

MP3 here. (41:52)

The Other Scott Horton (no relation) is a New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict. He is a contributing editor at Harper’s magazine and writes the blog No Comment.

Ray McGovern

Israel Lobby Wins Again

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/09_03_12_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, former senior analyst at the CIA, discusses the ebb and flow of neoconservative influence in the White House, how the scuttled Charles Freeman appointment weakens U.S. leverage with Israel, the incredible influence still exerted by Steven J. Rosen despite his indictment under the Espionage Act, the shortcomings of the mainstream media and how the 2007 National Intelligence Estimate on Iran prevented a disastrous war.

MP3 here. (40:42)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years, from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. His articles appear on Consortium News and Antiwar.com.

Noam Chomsky

Hegemony or Survival

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/09_03_03_chomsky.mp3]

Noam Chomsky, author of Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media, discusses the roots of U.S. imperialism, the often overlooked opportunity costs of empire, the exaggerated strength of U.S. economic rivals, the continuation of the Great Game into the 21st century, how the Western World’s observance of the Durand Line exacerbates problems in Afghanistan, the empire’s loss in Iraq, the U.S. doctrine of punishing Iran just to make an example out of them and the Israeli policy of incremental displacement of the Palestinian population in the occupied territories.

MP3 here. (41:12)

Noam Chomsky is professor emeritus of linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and widely regarded as the father of modern linguistics. He is the author of Failed States: The Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy, Necessary Illusions: Thought Control in Democratic Societies and dozens of other books on politics and linguistics.

Andy Worthington

Obama Good On Detainee Policy So Far

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/09_01_24_worthington.mp3]

Andy Worthington, author of the January 24th article “For Detainees, Obama Off to Good Start”, discusses Barack Obama’s initial executive orders regarding the closure of Gitmo and secret CIA prisons, the lengthy year-long review process for detainee trials, how the Bush administration’s torture policy ruined any opportunity to prosecute the few legitimate terrorism cases, the propaganda potential in the Pentagon’s loaded phrase “returned to the battlefield” and the relatively low recidivism rate of detainees released from Guantanamo compared to ordinary American civilian prisons.

MP3 here. (39:38)

Andy Worthington is a London-based historian and the author of The Guantanamo Files. His writing frequently appears on Counterpunch.org, rawstory.com, fff.org and antiwar.com/worthington.

Philip Giraldi

Israeli Spies Get Out of Jail Free

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/08_12_16_giraldi.mp3]

Former CIA counter-terrorism agent Philip Giraldi discusses his Antiwar.com article “Israel’s ‘Get Out of Jail Free’ Card” on Antiwar.com, discusses the degradation of law and order when Dick Cheney can admit that he authorized torture and not fear prosecution, the long delayed Steven Rosen and Keith Weissman espionage trial, rumors of a Bush pardon for Jonathan Pollard, the disconnect between federal agents who aggressively pursue espionage cases and their department heads who don’t follow through, Steven Rosen’s new day-job blogging for Daniel Pipes’ Middle East Forum and the disappearance of indicted spy-for-Israel Ben-Ami Kadish.

MP3 here. (45:57)

Philip Giraldi writes the bi-weekly Smoke and Mirrors column for Antiwar.com, is a board member of the American Conservative Defense Alliance, a contributing editor for The American Conservative magazine and a former counter terrorism officer for the CIA.

Eric Margolis

Mumbai Attack

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_11_28_margolis.mp3]

Eric Margolis, author of American Raj: Liberation or Domination?: Resolving the Conflict Between the West and the Muslim World, discusses the Mumbai terrorist attacks, India’s numerous enemies both foreign and domestic, the 2002 Gujarat province massacre of Indian Muslims, the sixty year long battle over Kashmir and the risk of an India-Pakistan nuclear war.

MP3 here. (48:24)

Eric Margolis is a foreign correspondent and columnist with the Quebecor Media Company and author of War at the Top of the World and American Raj.

Ray McGovern

Obama’s Daily Briefing

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_11_17_mcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, former CIA analyst and co-founder of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity, discusses the prospect of a proper presidential intelligence briefing in an Obama administration, what questions Obama should ask his foreign policy gurus about Iran, how the NYT finally got the Georgia story right, how Russia’s recent show of force helped put the kibosh on an Iran attack, Cheney’s false flag operation fantasies and why Robert Gates is a greater threat to peace than Rumsfeld.

MP3 here. (45:14)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for twenty seven years and a co-founder of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity.

Daphne Eviatar

Torture Is Illegal

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_30_eviatar.mp3]

Daphne Eviatar, lawyer and journalist for the Washington Independent, discusses the Bush Administration’s semantic games that are redefining torture, how John Yoo’s justification of waterboarding conveniently ignored numerous contradictory court precedents, the familiar refrain of fitting legal opinions around the policy, why the Hamdan ruling doesn’t help detainees outside of Guantanamo and how the growing Bagram prison and other “black” detention facilities remain outside the law and hidden from scrutiny.

MP3 here. (33:03)

Daphne Eviatar is a lawyer and freelance journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, The Nation, Legal Affairs, Mother Jones, the Washington Independent and many others. She is a Senior Reporter at The American Lawyer and was an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow in 2005 and a Pew International Journalism fellow in 2002.

James Bamford

The Shadow Factory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_21bamford.mp3]

James Bamford, author of The Puzzle Palace, Body of Secrets, A Pretext for War and now, The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America, discusses what the NSA knew about the 9/11 hijackers before the attack, the infighting between the CIA, NSA and FBI, the 9/11 hijackers proximity to NSA headquarters in Maryland prior to the attacks, the abandonment of law and limits on their domestic spying after 9/11, the complicity of major telecoms in helping the state tap the entire internet, the enormous new date storage and mining facility in San Antonio, Texas and the Israeli companies who make the software that runs the Big Brother database.

MP3 here. (49:51)

Update: The MP3 became broken somehow, but should now work fine.

James Bamford is the author of The Puzzle Palace: A Report on NSA, America’s Most Secret Agency. Published in 1982, it was the first book ever written about the National Security Agency and it became an immediate bestseller. He spent nearly a decade as the Washington Investigative Producer for ABC’s World News Tonight with Peter Jennings where he won a number of journalism awards for his coverage national security issues. In 1997, as the media profession began turning away from international news coverage and focusing almost exclusively on Monica Lewinsky and other domestic political scandals, Bamford left ABC to work on Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency. Initially published in April 2001 to rave reviews, it also became a national bestseller. His book A Pretext for War: 9/11, Iraq and the Abuse of America’s Intelligence Agencies remains one of the best resources on how the Cheney/Neocon cabal lied this country to war in Iraq. Bamford’s articles have appeared in dozens of publications, including cover stories for the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post Magazine, and the Los Angeles Times Magazine. His newest book is The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America.

Douglas Valentine

The Phoenix Program

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_16_valentine.mp3]

Douglas Valentine, author of The Phoenix Program, discusses the CIA’s Phoenix program targeting civilians during the Vietnam war, the similarities between the Phoenix program, the Nazis in France in World War II and the “War on Terror,” the vast difference between policy and operational realities, the tragedy of our support for, and murder of Diem, CIA “black propaganda,” the lies that initiate all American wars, the CIA’s criminal involvement in the drug trade, the corruption of the U.S. Congress and pessimism about the ability of the American people to put government power in check.

MP3 here. (40:31)

Douglas Valentine is the author of several books including The Strength of the Wolf: The Secret History of America’s War on Drugs and The Phoenix Program and a frequent contributor to the biweekly newsletter CounterPunch.

Lawrence Wilkerson

The Cheney Cabal’s Lies and Torture

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_13_wilkerson.mp3]

Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, (US Army Ret.), former chief of staff for Secretary of State Colin Powell, discusses the coalition of Oil and Israeli interests in pushing the invasion of Iraq, all the reasons that everyone should have known that the WMD and terrorism pretexts were just that, the disgrace he felt during Powell’s UN speech and his surprise at the positive coverage, the status of Anar al-Islam in Kurdistan before the war, the after the fact creation of al Qaeda in Iraq by Zarqawi and his allies, how he came to understand how the Cheney-Neocon cabal operated – too late, the continued polarization of American politics, the responsibility of David Addington, Jim Haynes, Doug Feith, Jay Bybee, John Yoo, Timothy Flanigan and Alberto Gonzales for the torture policy adopted after 9/11, its consequences, John McCain’s pro-torture Detainee Treatment Act, how the administration killed the Iranian peace offer of 2003 and how the administration let Osama bin Laden escape from Afghanistan in 2001.

MP3 here. (52:44)

Colonel Lawrence B. Wilkerson, U.S. Army (Ret.), was chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell from 2002 to 2005. He is now the Pamela Harriman Visiting Professor of Government and Public Policy at the College of William and Mary.

Gareth Porter

Iran Laptop Fraud; Hands Off Pakistan!

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_09_16_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and reporter for IPS News, discusses the probable MEK-NCRI/Israeli origins of the supposed “Smoking Laptop“; origin of all contemporary “outstanding questions” related to Iran’s nuclear program, some reasons why the accusations based around it do not stand up to scrutiny, and the National Intelligence Council’s warning to the White House against the ratcheting up of the war inside Pakistan.

MP3 here. (35:19)

Dr. Gareth Porter is an investigative historian and journalist on U.S. national security policy who has been independent since a brief period of university teaching in the 1980s. Dr. Porter is the author of four books, the latest of which is Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam (University of California Press, 2005). He has written regularly for Inter Press Service on U.S. policy toward Iraq and Iran since 2005.

Joe Lauria

For Sale: West’s Nuclear Secrets

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_08_08_lauria.mp3]

Investigative reporter Joe Lauria discusses the series he co-wrote for the London Times about the Sibel Edmonds case, including the 30 year Washington connection to the A.Q. Kahn nuclear black-market operation, the difficulty in corroborating stories about such a secretive subject, the inability of American mainstream media to diverge from the status quo, how the Tinner family fits into the story and the history of the military-industrial-congressional complex as told in the new book he’s co-authored with former senator Mike Gravel, A Political Odyssey.

MP3 here. (50:50)

Joe Lauria is a New York-based investigative journalist. A freelance member of the Sunday Times of London Insight team, he has also worked on investigations for the Boston Globe and Bloomberg News. Joe’s articles have additionally appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Mail, The Guardian, The Montreal Gazette, The Johannesburg Star, The Washington Times, New York Magazine, ARTnews and other publications.He is the author with former U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Mike Gravel of A Political Odyssey: The Rise of American Militarism and One Man’s Fight to Stop It, published by Seven Stories Press, with a foreword by Daniel Ellsberg.

Larry Velvel

Pushing for War Crimes Trials

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_07_31_velvel.mp3]

Larry Velvel, dean of the Massachusetts School of Law and sponsor of the upcoming Justice Robert Jackson Conference On The Planning For Prosecution Of High Level American War Criminals, featuring Francis Boyle, Vincent Bugliosi, Philippe Sands and others, discusses the many crimes of the Bush administration, the history of unaccountability of our leaders, the legal gymnastics perpetrated by the Bush regime lawyers, the immunity clauses of the Military Commission Act and how they might effect potential foreign prosecutions of American war criminals.

MP3 here. (34:20)

Lawrence R. Velvel is the Dean of Massachusetts School of Law and a professor of law. Mr. Velvel is a 1960 graduate of the University of Michigan and a 1963 graduate of the University of Michigan Law School, where he served on the law review and was elected to the Order of the Coif. He was a law professor from 1966-1978, first at the University of Kansas and then at Catholic University . He has been a partner in major law firms in Washington , D.C. , and was the first chief counsel of an organization established to write United States Supreme Court briefs in support of state and local governments. He has been active in Supreme Court litigation, constitutional law, antitrust law and complex litigation. He is the author of a book dealing with constitutional aspects of the Vietnam war, of seventeen law review articles and of twenty-three articles for legal and daily newspapers. He has written thirty-three United States Supreme Court briefs and is editor of the MSLAW journal called The Long Term View.

Philip Giraldi

Beware False Flag Attack In Iraq

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_07_28_giraldi.mp3]

Philip Giraldi, former CIA counter-terrorism officer and columnist for Antiwar.com, discusses the possibility of and precedents for an Israeli “False Flag” operation in Iraq to frame Iran and draw the U.S. into attacking, the conflicts within the administration over Iran policy, the likely catastrophic consequences of any attack, U.S. covert operations within Iran, America’s support of the Iranian Islamic Revolution back in 1979, how real conservative principles apply to foreign policy, the extensive databases of “dangerous” Americans kept by the government, total lack of accountability in Washington, provocative stance toward Russia and demented neocon view of the world.

MP3 here. (39:41)

Philip Giraldi is a former DIA and CIA officer, partner at Cannistraro Associates, Francis Walsingham Fellow for the American Conservative Defense Alliance, contributing editor at the American Conservative magazine and columnist at Antiwar.com.

Robert Parry

25 Year War Against Journalism

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_07_02_parry.mp3]

Robert Parry, proprietor of ConsortiumNews.com and author of Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush, discusses his new revelations on the Iran-Contra scandal how the Reagan administration used the CIA for a propaganda campaign against the American population, Iran-Contra was the pilot program for the neocon hijacking of the government, the legal black-hole of the Vice President’s office and the slippery semantics of the War Party, the history of covert tactics the right-wing uses to control the corporate media and its enemies, and the War Party’s view of the President’s total power.

MP3 here. (54:41)

YouTube here.

Robert Parry, who broke many of the Iran-Contra stories in the 1980s for the Associated Press and Newsweek, runs ConsortiumNews.com, and is the author of Secrecy & Privilege: Rise of the Bush Dynasty from Watergate to Iraq and the brand new Neck Deep: The Disastrous Presidency of George W. Bush.

Melvin Goodman

Failure of Intelligence

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_06_23_goodman.mp3]

Melvin Goodman, author of Failure of Intelligence: The Rise and Fall of the CIA, discusses problems with the CIA, how the serial intelligence manipulator Robert Gates was brought in to replace Rumsfeld only after Rumsfeld started talking about withdrawal, the history of distorting intelligence to fit the policy, how the military runs the intelligence apparatus, Congress’s indifference to the Constitutional crisis and our inevitable failures in Iraq and the militarily-led war on terror.

MP3 here. (34:44)

YouTube here.

Mel Goodman was a senior analyst in Soviet affairs at the Central Intelligence Agency, where he worked for two decades (1966-1986). He later served as a Soviet analyst at the State Department, and he currently is professor of international studies at the National War College and a senior fellow at the Center for International Policy. He is the author of three books on Soviet and Russian Affairs: Gorbachev’s Retreat: The End of Superpower Rivalry in the Third World, The Wars of Eduard Shevardnadze, and The End of the Cold War.

Scott Horton

The Law vs. The Torture Regime

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_06_19_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton, heroic international human rights lawyer, journalist for Harper’s magazine and steadfast opponent of torture, discusses his new article for The New Republic, “Travel Advisory,” the Supreme Court’s reversal of the War Party’s end-run around habeas corpus, how Bush continually ignores Supreme Court decisions, the many war crimes committed by the Bush administration principals and their lawyers, how prosecution might proceed in foreign states, how “the war council” plotted the whole torture regime, the many people who have been killed under U.S. custody, the charade of the military tribunal system, how our policy of torture is the terrorists best recruiting tool and the danger of a total police state.

MP3 here. (44:18)

The Other Scott Horton is a contributing editor at Harper’s magazine and pens the blog No Comment. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union. He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Philip Giraldi

Israeli Espionage In America

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_06_12_giraldi.mp3]

Philip Giraldi discusses his recent article “The Spy Who Loves Us: Israeli Espionage In America” about the extensive Israeli spy network inside America and their surveillance of the 9/11 hijackers, the corroboration of their spying by U.S. intelligence agencies, the case of spy Jonathan Pollard and how Israel passes it’s stolen intel on to many enemies of America, the still secret identity of Israeli very top level asset “Mega,” the spy for Israel, Ben-Ami Kadish, and his treasonous crimes, the Israeli and Iranian influence in the run-up to the Iraq invasion, the White House/Iranian “negotiation” charade, and the planning for and consequences of an attack against Iran – including the possible use of nuclear weapons.

MP3 here. (40:04)

YouTube here.

Philip Giraldi is a former DIA and CIA officer, partner at Cannistraro Associates, Francis Walsingham Fellow for the American Conservative Defense Alliance, contributing editor at the American Conservative magazine and columnist at Antiwar.com.

Scott Horton

FBI ‘War Crimes File’ Coverup

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_05_21_horton.mp3]

The Other Scott Horton (no relation), heroic international human rights lawyer, journalist for Harper’s magazine and steadfast opponent of torture, discusses the new Department of Justice Inspector General report revealing the “War Crimes File” kept by FBI agents stationed at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the dropping of the charges against alleged “20th hijacker” Mohammed al Qatani, a military judge’s recent dismissal of one of the members of the prosecution team after he pushed to have the “sexiest” cases timed to go to “trial” during the presidential election season, the coverup of the war crimes file by DoJ higherups, likely Alice Fischer and Michael Chertoff (now the head of the DHS), the participation of the very highest authorities in the Bush administration, the torture of Abu Zubaydah, John Yoo and Doug Feith’s war against the Geneva conventions, the convergence of America and China’s criminal justice systems, the CIA “ghost prisons,” Iraqi and Afghan jails and renditions to Ethiopia, Morocco, Jordan, Thailand, etc. and the holes in the various recent bans on torture.

MP3 here. (31:46)

YouTube here.

The Other Scott Horton is a contributing editor at Harper’s magazine and pens the blog No Comment. A New York attorney known for his work in emerging markets and international law, especially human rights law and the law of armed conflict, Horton lectures at Columbia Law School. A life-long human rights advocate, Scott served as counsel to Andrei Sakharov and Elena Bonner, among other activists in the former Soviet Union. He is a co-founder of the American University in Central Asia, and has been involved in some of the most significant foreign investment projects in the Central Eurasian region. Scott recently led a number of studies of abuse issues associated with the conduct of the war on terror for the New York City Bar Association, where he has chaired several committees, including, most recently, the Committee on International Law. He is also a member of the board of the National Institute of Military Justice, the Andrei Sakharov Foundation, the EurasiaGroup and the American Branch of the International Law Association.

Bruce Gagnon

Every Great Empire Needs a Death Star

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_04_28_gagnon.mp3]

Bruce Gagnon, coordinator of the Global Network Against Weapons and Nuclear Power in Space, discusses the hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars being spent to weaponize space, the 1997 blueprint to control space, “Vision 2020,” how the corporations are our overlords and control society, the proposed mining of Mars by Halliburton, how the military will control who can or can’t travel in space, the economic fascism of socializing costs while privatizing profits, how “Operation Paper Clip” brought 1500 top Nazis to America to start our space program; the CIA; and the MK Ultra mind control experiments, how the Downlink Listening Stations, controlled by STRATCOM, spy on Americans, the danger of the United Command, the future war between the U.S. and China for the world’s resources, the arms race that America has caused by threatening China and Russia, how the “economic draft” will supply endless soldiers for endless war, Rods from God and the necessity of dismantling the military industrial complex.

MP3 here. (37:42)

Bruce Gagnon, a Young Republican turned peace activist during the Vietnam War, is director of the Global Network Against Weapons and Nuclear Power in Space.

Michael Scheuer

Bad Tidings in the Terror Wars

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_04_15_scheuer.mp3]

Michael Scheuer, former chief of the CIA’s bin Laden unit and author of Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraq, discusses his view that the U.S. betrayal of loyal dictator Musharraf is terrible for Pakistan and U.S. interests in the region, the rising hatred of U.S. foreign policy in the Muslim World, the detrimental effect of the U.S. government’s Israel-centric foreign policy, Ron Paul’s effort to explain to the American people why al Qaeda attacked us on 9/11, why a Ron Paul-style foreign policy would be the worst thing for them, energy independence, future war for oil in Nigeria, Cheney’s argument that al Qaeda in Iraq could ever take over that land, the failure of the media to challenge politicians on this point, his view that Obama, McCain and Clinton – due to their Israel-first stances – will stay in Iraq for at least the next four years, the danger to Israel posed by the neocons’ stupid policies, the extraordinary rendition program and his role in creating it, the necessity of figuring out a way to apply the rule of law to those detained in the terror war, torture, al Libbi’s tortured accusations of ties between Saddam and Osama, his CIA team’s proving that there were no such ties before the war, the strategy behind the September 11th attacks, the fact that Osama has explained exactly what that strategy is for 10 years, and a brief sketch of his new book.

MP3 here. (40:42)

Michael Scheuer is a 22-year veteran of the CIA and the author of Through Our Enemies Eyes: Osama bin Laden, Radical Islam, and the Future of America, Marching Toward Hell: America and Islam After Iraqand Imperial Hubris: Why the West Is Losing the War on Terror.

Ray McGovern

It’s Against the Law to Torture People

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/aw041108raymcgovern.mp3]

Ray McGovern, veteran intelligence analyst for the CIA, joins Charles in studio to discuss George Bush’s criminal “authorization” of the torture of human beings, the arrogance of those who hold unlimited power, the details of the conspiracy between Bush, Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, Alberto Gonzales, David Addington, Condoleezza Rice, and George Tenet to get it done, the Democrats’ refusal to do a thing about it, how the retroactive immunity in and the Military Commissions Act of 2006 makes it easier for foreign courts to indict these war criminals, the difference between the analytical and “Gestapo” side of the CIA, the recent ABC News torture conspiracy revelations, the question of retroactive immunity in the torture and NSA domestic spying cases, the supreme war crime and “accumulated evils” of aggressive war, the urgency of impeachment as a preventive measure against war with Iran, John McCain’s insane neocon crew and their desire for war with Iran, Elliot Abrams dangerous role in Iran policy and the centrality of Israel to the neocon agenda, the lies about Iran’s role in Iraq and his giving back of his commendation medal given to him by George H.W. Bush.

MP3 here. (58:23)

Ray McGovern was a CIA analyst for 27 years – from the John F. Kennedy administration to that of George H. W. Bush. He is a co-founder of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity.