Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_28_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses his “War and Inflation“speech at a 2008 Future of Freedom Foundation conference;” how central banking allows governments to fund wars and empire through money printing instead of direct taxation, keeping a lid on internal dissent; why deflation is a normal and desirable condition of productive economies; and why Keynesianism is best summarized as the economics of state power.

MP3 here. (22:08)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_22_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, discusses Ron Paul as an economic prophet of sorts (revered by devout followers, scorned by the majority); Woods’s personal transformation from party-line Republican to peace and liberty advocate; Paul’s paradigm shifting moment, where he stood up to Rudy Giuliani’s ignorant tirade about 9/11 in the 2008 Republican primaries; and how the college kids who are reading Mises instead of Keynes – thanks to Ron Paul – could change academia for a generation.

MP3 here. (20:15)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Ivan Eland

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_06_21_eland.mp3]

Ivan Eland, Senior Fellow at The Independent Institute and regular contributor to Antiwar.com, discusses his new book No War For Oil: U.S. Dependency and the Middle East; why it isn’t necessary to secure oil supplies with military force; how US meddling in the Middle East increases oil prices and destabilizes regional governments; why national energy independence is a foolish pursuit; his article “Smoke and Mirrors in Energy Policy;” and how sanctions on Iranian oil exports help China and India get a discount on their energy needs.

MP3 here. (21:44)

Ivan Eland is a senior fellow at the Independent Institute and author of Recarving Rushmore: Ranking the Presidents on Peace, Prosperity, and Liberty.

Robert P. Murphy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_05_22_murphy.mp3]

Robert P. Murphy, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, discusses his article “Who Needs War for Oil;” why the US military doesn’t need to intervene in the Middle East to “secure” supplies of oil; how embargoes hurt oil exporting countries more than their customers (shown by the US-supported embargo on Iran); and the contrarian theory that oil scarcity and higher prices are the true US policy goals.

MP3 here. (20:13)

Robert P. Murphy is an adjunct scholar of the Mises Institute, where he teaches at the Mises Academy. He runs the blog Free Advice and is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal, and his newest book, Lessons for the Young Economist.

Eric Phillips

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/12_03_07_phillips.mp3]

Eric Phillips, writer and graduate student in economic history, discusses his article “Military Spending and Bastiat’s ‘Unseen;'” the opportunity costs (in terms of dollars and innovation) when money is taken from the private sector and spent on national defense; why frightened Americans support enormous military budgets far in excess of what’s needed for defensive purposes; Obama’s defense “cuts” that are just reducing the rate of increase; and the high unemployment rate for young veterans, despite election year jobs programs targeted specifically for them.

MP3 here. (20:15)

Eric Phillips is a writer from Philadelphia, currently studying economic history in graduate school. He is the founder of the blog Notes & Observations. His articles have been featured on Mises.org, LewRockwell.com, EconomicPolicyJournal.com, and in Taki’s Magazine.

Robert P. Murphy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_18_murphy.mp3]

Robert P. Murphy, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, discusses his article “The Economics of War;” how open markets and free trade make expansionist states and war unnecessary; a cost/benefit analysis of empire and “war for oil;” and the $15 trillion US debt (a trillion here, a trillion there, and soon you’re talking real money).

MP3 here. (22:47)

Robert P. Murphy is an adjunct scholar of the Mises Institute, where he teaches at the Mises Academy. He runs the blog Free Advice and is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal, and his newest book, Lessons for the Young Economist.

Andrew Bacevich

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_11_14_bacevich.mp3]

Andrew Bacevich, Professor of International Relations at Boston University and author of The Short American Century: A Postmortem, discusses his article “The Passing of the Postwar Era;” the major factors leading to a “transformative” decline in US power and prestige on the world stage; the American political elites who are driving the country into a ditch; the redundancy or counter-productivity of overseas bases (excepting the Asia Pacific region); and the lack of “prudent” decision making in Washington D.C.

MP3 here. (10:18)

Andrew J. Bacevich is Professor of International Relations and History at Boston University. A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, he received his PhD in American Diplomatic History from Princeton University. Before joining the faculty of Boston University, he taught at West Point and Johns Hopkins.

Bacevich is the author of Washington Rules: America’s Path to Permanent War (2010).  His previous books include The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism (2008);  The Long War: A New History of US National Security Policy since World War II (2007) (editor); The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War (2005); and American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U. S. Diplomacy (2002). His essays and reviews have appeared in a variety of scholarly and general interest publications including The Wilson Quarterly, The National Interest, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, The Nation, and The New Republic. His op-eds have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Boston Globe, and Los Angeles Times, among other newspapers.

In 2004, Dr. Bacevich was a Berlin Prize Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. He has also held fellowships at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_10_31_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio host and author of the upcoming new book Red and Blue and Broke All Over: Restoring America’s Free Economy, discusses why America’s economic and political problems can’t be solved until the red-blue paradigm is rejected; irreconcilable economic headlines where consumer spending is up while income drops – and nobody asks why; why the demand (Keynes) and supply-siders (Friedman) are two sides of the same government monetary intervention coin; a summary of the global debt crisis and European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF); the other PIIGS countries teetering on insolvency while Greek rescue plans founder; how “military Keynesianism” has bankrupted the US; the intertwined fates of US empire and the dollar; and why Americans prefer a stern father-figure for president, even one as clueless as Herman Cain.

MP3 here. (34:08)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.)

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_28_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses why the American Dream is collapsing; the dollar’s rapid decline since leaving the (partial) gold standard in 1971; keeping the fiat currency game going by waging war – the biggest public works/jobs stimulus program imaginable; how the dollar’s reserve currency status, solidified by dollar denominated oil sales, has let the US expand its empire far beyond sustainability; and why economic troubles often prompt people to scapegoat minorities, rather than directing their anger toward the actual causes.

MP3 here. (25:52)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_19_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, author and former Antiwar Radio co-contributor, discusses his upcoming new book Red and Blue and Broke All Over: Restoring America’s Free Economy; the “cocaine theory” of economic stimulus; why the bond market bubble – the biggest one yet – has to pop someday; how the US dollar’s weakness is masked by the simultaneous devaluation of all the world’s fiat currencies; why the first major country to institute a gold-backed currency will dominate global finance; why it’s no coincidence the most innovative, cost-competitive industries have the least government intervention; and why economic central planning in a country of 300+ million people is doomed to failure.

MP3 here. (32:45)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_09_09_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses his article “9/11 and the National Security Scam;” why top government officials must know their policies provoke more terrorist attacks, rather than prevent them; hearty cheers at the GOP debate for Rick Perry’s record-setting execution pace as Texas Governor; the cynical use of 9/11 casualties to justify an increasingly ruthless foreign policy; why “macro measures” like GNP and the unemployment rate are poor measures of national wealth and success; and why we must press the fight against the common perception that war is good for the economy.

MP3 here. (41:45)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_07_07_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses the consistently excellent moral and political record of Ron Paul throughout the years; why a foreign policy “Golden Rule” works best; the wisdom of cutting war spending before domestic entitlements during an economic crisis; the essentially (soft) fascistic US economic system of today; and whether or not public office can be the mechanism to reign in government excesses (in case of a successful 2012 Ron Paul presidential run).

MP3 here. (20:11)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Gareth Porter

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_24_porter.mp3]

Gareth Porter, independent historian and journalist for IPS News, discusses his article “Obama Leaves Door Open to Long-Term US Afghan Combat;” the “lunatic warmonger” Republicans who reversed course after hearing the “end the wars” demands of their constituents; how Obama essentially traded the domestic Democratic political agenda for the Afghan surge; how, despite the minimal drawdown, David Petraeus got almost everything he wanted; the hubris of Robert Gates, who had no idea the US national security state could be subject to economic limits; and why US strategy in Afghanistan is best described as praying for a miracle.

MP3 here. (20:06)

Gareth Porter is an independent historian and journalist. He is the author of Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to War in Vietnam. His articles appear on Counterpunch, Huffington Post, Inter Press Service News Agency and Antiwar.com.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_13_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses his LRC article “Obama Gets it Half Right,” the diminishing returns of government “stimulus” deficit spending, Bernanke’s additional job duty: juice up the stock market, why we need higher interest rates (but the decision and power to do so should not be centrally planned), the Fed as last buyer of Treasury debt, and now the largest holder, and the foreign policy implications of bad economic policy: increased militarism by desperate politicians trying to distract the public from the actual problems.

MP3 here. (19:56)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Robert Higgs

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_07_higgs.mp3]

Robert Higgs, senior fellow at the Independent Institute and author of Crisis and Leviathan, discusses his cherished yet under-appreciated chapter 3 in Crisis and Leviathan, about the rational ideological motivation of collective action; beating back the pervasive myth that war stimulates and improves the economy; how the increase in US GDP following massive post-WWII cuts in government spending undermines Keynesian economic theory; and why there is no such thing as free money: government spending is either derived from direct taxation or by debasing the dollar.

MP3 here. (18:37)

Robert Higgs is Senior Fellow in Political Economy for The Independent Institute and Editor of the Institute’s quarterly journal The Independent Review. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, and he has taught at the University of Washington, Lafayette College, Seattle University, and the University of Economics, Prague. He has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University and Stanford University, and a fellow for the Hoover Institution and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Higgs is the editor of The Independent Institute books Opposing the Crusader State, The Challenge of Liberty, Re-Thinking Green, Hazardous to Our Health? and Arms, Politics, and the Economy, plus the volume Emergence of the Modern Political Economy.

His authored books include Neither Liberty Nor Safety, Depression, War, and Cold War, Politická ekonomie strachu (The Political Economy of Fear, in Czech), Resurgence of the Warfare State, Against Leviathan, The Transformation of the American Economy 1865-1914, Competition and Coercion, and Crisis and Leviathan. A contributor to numerous scholarly volumes, he is the author of more than 100 articles and reviews in academic journals.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_03_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses the two competing bills on Libya – Dennis Kucinich’s legally binding demand for withdrawal and John Boehner’s nonbinding suggestion that Obama seek Congress’s approval, eventually; the rising antiwar sentiment among Americans, reflected but not necessarily shared by their representatives in Congress; why the new 2011 National Intelligence Estimate on Iran should be declassified; the unyielding US foothold in Iraq; and the Fed bailout money that went to foreign banks, plus more shenanigans blacked out in the Fed’s document dump.

MP3 here. (10:47)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of Liberty Defined: 50 Essential Issues That Affect Our Freedom, The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and End the Fed. His archived columns for Antiwar.com are here.

Anthony Gregory

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_06_02_gregory.mp3]

Anthony Gregory, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, discusses Murray Rothbard’s book Wall Street, Banks, and American Foreign Policy (with an introduction by Anthony Gregory); banks and the war machine, closely collaborating since the 1800s; shattering the left-right paradigm and finding the intersection of corporate power and public corruption; why the US economic system is not now, and has never been, based on unfettered free market capitalism; and how the state apparatus attracts those seeking power and privilege, putting the lie to the Marxist theory of capturing government to “help the little guy.”

MP3 here. (19:40)

Anthony Gregory is a research analyst at the Independent Institute, Editor in Chief of Campaign for Liberty, moderator of the Beacon, policy adviser to the Future of Freedom Foundation and columnist for LewRockwell.com. He guest edits Strike the Root. His writing has appeared in such places as the Christian Science Monitor San Diego Union Tribune, Antiwar.com, the Journal of Libertarian Studies, Counterpunch, the American Conservative, Liberty Magazine, the Mises Institute blog, the Stress Blog, The Libertarian Enterprise and Liberty and Power, as well as in textbooks, journals and other outlets, and has been translated in several languages.

He wrote for Michael Badnarik’s 2004 campaign. He got his B.A. in history at UC Berkeley in 2003, where he wrote his thesis on the 1993 Waco disaster. He sings and plays in a rock band, the Melatones, and is an Eagle Scout. He gives talks frequently and is now writing an Independent Institute book on habeas corpus, detention policy and individual liberty.

Joshua Holland

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_05_31_holland.mp3]

Joshua Holland, editor and senior writer at AlterNet, discusses his article “Five Eye-Opening Facts About Our Bloated Post-9/11 ‘Defense’ Spending;” how the “Medicare gap” pales in comparison to the defense spending increase since 9/11; the significant but unknown costs of war, including long term care for severely wounded soldiers; the common ideological ground shared by leftists and Ron Paul libertarians; what your tax dollars buy, in terms of guns and butter; and how defense spending accounts for the vast majority of public debt – and should be the first target of budget cuts.

MP3 here. (19:48)

Joshua Holland is an editor and senior writer at AlterNet. He is the author of The 15 Biggest Lies About the Economy (and Everything else the Right Doesn’t Want You to Know About Taxes, Jobs and Corporate America).

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_21_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses the grossly inadequate spending cut plans from Democrats and Republicans alike; how the narrow partisan debate on economic issues ignores the fact that both guns and butter are off the table; how the dollar is dying, squeezed from without and within; Congressional Republicans who won’t cut the Pentagon budget for fear of losing defense contracts in their districts; and why the University of Texas endowment fund’s decision to take physical delivery of its gold is a seminal event.

MP3 here. (21:31)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_19_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, discusses the pivotal events (Quebec Act, the “shot heard ’round the world“) preceding the Revolutionary War; the persistent myths surrounding the Civil War, southern secession and slavery; how the Union victory transformed the country into a “nation” with a strong central government and budding imperialist ambitions; and the antiwar case for a gold standard monetary system.

MP3 here. (19:17)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

 

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_15_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses his article, “Uncle Sam’s big plans for your hard-earned tax dollars;” the two-party “consensus of rascals” on US foreign policy; the “best and brightest” government policymakers who are blinded by arrogance, tunnel vision and echo chambers; and the confusion about whether disastrous foreign policy decisions are made by design, incompetence, or some combination thereof.

MP3 here. (20:12)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

 

Robert P. Murphy

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_04_13_murphy.mp3]

Robert P. Murphy, author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, discusses why the old adage “war is good for the economy” is simply not true; the hidden costs in “trickle down” benefits from large government and military expenditures (like the highway system and communications infrastructure); the Obama administration’s inconsistent policy on large government deficits; and how US money creation prompts other countries to follow suit, debasing currencies around the world and leading to speculative bubbles.

MP3 here. (21:01)

Robert P. Murphy is an adjunct scholar of the Mises Institute, where he teaches at the Mises Academy. He runs the blog Free Advice and is the author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism, The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Great Depression and the New Deal, and his newest book, Lessons for the Young Economist.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_29_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, discusses the actual constitutional war-making powers of the president; why UN mandates do not override the sovereignty of national governments; the “imminent attack” exception to a congressional authorization of war (though somehow FDR found the time after Pearl Harbor to ask for and receive a formal declaration); why the US Constitution is better off in the junk yard than the repair shop; and the cynical American priorities responsible for shutting off the streetlights on Main Street before taking away a dime from the empire.

MP3 here. (19:53)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

George Donnelly

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_25_donnelly.mp3]

Libertarian activist George Donnelly discusses the libertarian online streaming video Agorist Unconference this weekend, March 25-27; working to establish a free market and alternate currencies outside the bounds of state control; and a sample of unconference speakers, ranging from whole milk farmers to pirate radio operators to New Hampshire free-staters. Scott Horton and Antiwar Radio producer Angela Keaton are also schedule to speak.

MP3 here. (19:51)

George Donnelly is a libertarian activist, radio host and blogger. He organized the We Won’t Fly campaign and the Agorist Unconference.

Rep. Walter Jones

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_17_jones.mp3]

Rep. Walter Jones, eight term Congressman from North Carolina, discusses the talk of a 2014, instead of 2011, Afghanistan withdrawal deadline; the Kucinich-Jones cosponsored bill requiring Obama to get the troops out by year’s end; the elusive definition of “winning” the war (possibly meaning building roads and schools in Afghanistan while US infrastructure crumbles); why the US can’t continue as the world’s policeman while borrowing the money to do so; using smarter tactics (more bombs, fewer troops) in fighting the war on terrorism; and how a renewed military draft will serve as a forceful reminder to Americans that there are indeed wars going on.

MP3 here. (19:49)

Walter Jones was first sworn in to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1995, after serving 10 years as an elected member of the North Carolina General Assembly. Currently serving his 8th term in Congress, Congressman Jones is a member of the House Committees on Armed Services and Financial Services.

Robert Higgs

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_02_higgs.mp3]

Robert Higgs, senior fellow at the Independent Institute and author of Crisis and Leviathan, discusses the theory that Islamic terrorists and other “outsiders brought about the 2008 financial crisis, rather than loose monetary policy and securitization run amok; how to make a quick buck by pitching ridiculous reports to the Pentagon; the government’s post-9/11 spending binge that permeated throughout government, not just in the Pentagon; why wars are financed with deficits instead of direct taxation; the weak alternatives to the US dollar as world reserve currency; and an economic forecast of 1970s style stagflation.

MP3 here. (21:22)

Robert Higgs is Senior Fellow in Political Economy for The Independent Institute and Editor of the Institute’s quarterly journal The Independent Review. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, and he has taught at the University of Washington, Lafayette College, Seattle University, and the University of Economics, Prague. He has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University and Stanford University, and a fellow for the Hoover Institution and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Higgs is the editor of The Independent Institute books Opposing the Crusader State, The Challenge of Liberty, Re-Thinking Green, Hazardous to Our Health? and Arms, Politics, and the Economy, plus the volume Emergence of the Modern Political Economy.

His authored books include Neither Liberty Nor Safety, Depression, War, and Cold War, Politická ekonomie strachu (The Political Economy of Fear, in Czech), Resurgence of the Warfare State, Against Leviathan, The Transformation of the American Economy 1865-1914, Competition and Coercion, and Crisis and Leviathan. A contributor to numerous scholarly volumes, he is the author of more than 100 articles and reviews in academic journals.

Ara Sanjian and Dennis Marburger

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_02_sanjian_marburger.mp3]

Ara Sanjian, Associate Professor in Armenian and Middle Eastern History, discusses the Armenian demonstrations that are somewhat inspired by Egypt et al, but are of a different character; discontent about lack of political reform and economic opportunity; conflicts arising from border disputes with Azerbaijan; how the Soviet dissolution left the Armenian economy in the hands of oligarchs; and the few bright spots: an educated populace and affordable internet access and mobile phones.

MP3 here. (15:35)

Ara Sanjian is Associate Professor in Armenian and Middle Eastern History at the University of Michigan – Dearborn.

Dennis Marburger is a friend of Antiwar Radio.

Chris Hellman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_03_01_hellman.mp3]

Chris Hellman, Communications and Budget Analyst for the National Priorities Project, discusses the $1.2 trillion national security budget; how government secrecy and over-classification of documents hides wasteful programs and prevents Congressional oversight; huge projected increases in health care and pensions for veterans and retired military; and the bloated Homeland Security, intelligence and State Department budgets.

MP3 here. (20:17)

Chris Hellman is Communications and Budget Analyst for the National Priorities Project.

Chris joined NPP after serving as a military policy analyst for the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation where his work focused on national security spending, military planning and policy, base closures, major weapons systems, trends in the defense industry, global military spending, and homeland security. Prior to joining the Center, Chris spent six years as a Senior Research Analyst at the Center for Defense Information. He also worked for two years as a military budget specialist at Physicians for Social Responsibility. Previously, Chris spent ten years on Capitol Hill as a congressional staffer working on national security and foreign policy issues. He is a frequent media commentator on military planning, policy, and budgetary issues and is the author of numerous reports and articles. He holds a Bachelors Degree from Middlebury College in Vermont

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_25_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses his article, “Too Late! The Government Already Did Do Something” at lewrockwell.com; how government-imposed wage and price controls lead to shortages and eventually black markets; the producer pricing pressures that are overlooked when limits are set on the price of finished consumer goods; and Ludwig von Mises’s reminder to keep the monetary system out of government hands.

MP3 here. (20:30)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_24_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses why Congress and the White House won’t be able to resist the temptation of military intervention in Libya and Saudi Arabia (should the uprisings spread there); how the US exports inflation, since commodities are priced in dollars; Ben Bernanke’s opinion that central banks are always the solution to, not the cause of, the world’s economic problems; the dollar’s devaluation reflected in the price of gold; and why, legalized or not, competing currencies will be used in times of economic collapse.

MP3 here. (13:43)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and Freedom Under Siege. His archived columns for Antiwar.com are here.

Will Grigg

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_21_grigg.mp3]

Will Grigg, blogger and author of Liberty in Eclipse, discusses the connection between Federal Reserve monetary policy and increased food prices around the world; the unprecedented scope of US empire (and the correspondingly large payroll); the Jeffersonian, rather than jihadist, nature of protests in Egypt and beyond; the future of militarist oligarchic government, previewed in Madison, Wisconsin; and why all government unions should be abolished, starting with the police.

MP3 here. (18:56)

Will Grigg writes the blog Pro Libertate and is the author of Liberty in Eclipse. Archives of his Pro Libertate Radio show on the Liberty News Radio Network can be found here.

Tom Engelhardt

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_09_engelhardt.mp3]

Tom Engelhardt, creator of Tomdispatch.com and author of The American Way of War: How Bush’s Wars Became Obama’s, discusses why the Cold War only ended for the Soviets in 1991, as the lone remaining superpower traded the “peace dividend” for 20 years of economic and military unilateralism; Chase Madar’s impassioned mock opening statement for the defense of Bradley Manning, featured at Tomdispatch; the death knell sounding for Pax Americana and US exceptionalism, as client states come under siege and US influence wanes; and the self righteous media commentary on Afghan financial corruption, with few willing to concede similarities to the US system of unprecedented fraud and nonexistent prosecutions.

MP3 here. (18:09)

Tom Engelhardt created and runs the Tomdispatch.com website, a project of The Nation Institute where he is a Fellow. He is the author of a highly praised history of American triumphalism in the Cold War, The End of Victory Culture, and of a novel, The Last Days of Publishing, as well as a collection of his Tomdispatch interviews, Mission Unaccomplished. Each spring he is a Teaching Fellow at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. His newest book is The American Way of War: How Bush’s Wars Became Obama’s.

Jacob Hornberger

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_08_hornberger.mp3]

Jacob Hornberger, founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses how Washington’s mixed messages on Egypt are exposing the US government’s preference for dictatorships over democracies when they suit policy goals; why the US isn’t quite ready to join Chile and other countries willing to look back and examine previous government misdeeds; and why abandoning empire doesn’t presage military defeat and economic ruin.

MP3 here. (17:43)

Jacob G. Hornberger is founder and president of The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is a regular writer for The Future of Freedom Foundation’s publication, Freedom Daily, and is a co-editor or contributor to the eight books that have been published by the Foundation.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_07_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses the heartening Egyptian fight for liberty and freedom from government oppression; why the real threat of global domination comes from the US empire, not some Islamic caliphate; how crop subsidies and Fed monetary policy contribute to food riots in the third world; the close cooperation of Egyptian Christians and Muslims in their mutual defense; and why, even if the US isn’t quite ready for revolution, economic imperatives may force the issue.

MP3 here. (21:02)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_03_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses why opponents of state power are naturally against war; Murray Rothbard’s foreign policy litmus test for assessing devotion to liberty; the history of  left-libertarianism and the conceptual left-right political spectrum, from the post-French Revolution era onward; and why across-the-board deregulation is not a free market cure-all, especially while state privileges like bailouts, FDIC insurance and government guarantees remain in place.

MP3 here. (20:05)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/11_02_03_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Rollback: Repealing Big Government Before the Coming Fiscal Collapse, discusses why the trillion dollar military budget is the most deserving candidate for federal spending cuts; why the military’s aging weapons and vehicles, and the shrunken Air Force and Navy, should make us wonder where all the money is going; how an increase in interest rates would end the charade that US debt levels are sustainable; and some creative ideas on reducing the rolls of social security.

MP3 here. (22:03)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_21_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, author of The Left, The Right and The State, discusses the life and work of Ludwig von Mises, who integrated business cycle theory into a comprehensive Austrian School of economics; how Murray N. Rothbard helped make opposition to war a core principle of libertarianism; and why Ron Paul’s appointment as Chairman of the Domestic Monetary Policy Subcommittee should make for some interesting conflicts with the Fed and Wall Street banks.

MP3 here. (18:50)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_15_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Nullification: How to Resist Federal Tyranny in the 21st Century, discusses the few Leftists and many libertarians working to shift the balance of power away from Washington and toward local control; why it’s still hard to shake the nearly 150-year old misconception that secessionists are slavery sympathizers; why an ignorant population is much more likely to inherit an authoritarian state than a libertarian paradise following a government and economic collapse; and polls that show a large majority of Americans prefer unchecked government secrecy and have no interest in maintaining a free press.

MP3 here. (19:19)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

William Buppert

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_09_buppert.mp3]

Bill Buppert, retired US Army officer and blogger, discusses the near-revolt of junior officers in the US armed forces over the bogus reasons given for war in Iraq and Afghanistan; COIN‘s failure against Islamic insurgencies dating back to WWII; how the immature antics of young soldiers deployed abroad make winning “hearts and minds” all but impossible; fascism in the form of the American Protective League during the Woodrow Wilson administration; the danger an unforeseen “black swan” event will suddenly collapse the US empire and economy; and how a single state seceding from the US will rapidly accelerate the nation’s dissolution.

MP3 here. (18:05)

Bill Buppert is a retired officer from the US Army living in the high desert of the American Southwest with his wife and home-schooled family. He has been a writer for a number of publications to include www.lewrockwell.com. He is particularly interested in the issues of liberty, survival, shooting and military history.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_12_07_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses Ben Bernanke’s 60 Minutes interview where he declares (with lip-quivering certitude) a “100 percent confidence” the Fed can control inflation; how the Fed filled up on bad assets full of “mystery meat” in their quantitative easing program(s); Republican deficit reduction plans that will be decimated from even a minuscule increase in interest rates; the crisis in fiat money as most of the world’s currencies are debased relative to hard assets; and why Americans are still asleep at the switch while their government actively destroys the economy.

MP3 here. (37:57)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Thomas E. Woods and Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_11_02_woods_goyette.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods and Charles Goyette, authors of Meltdown and The Dollar Meltdown (respectively), discuss Washington Post writer David Broder’s assertion that a war with Iran would save Obama’s legacy and the economy, why it’s still important to fight against the myth that WWII caused the end of the Great Depression, how surging commodity prices and a falling dollar signal serious consumer price inflation by next year, the post-9/11 economic sugar high engineered by Alan “Maestro” Greenspan’s interest rate cuts, the insignificant spending cuts in the GOP’s “Pledge to America” and why Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign will be a barn-burner.

MP3 here. (40:27)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Thomas Harrington

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_10_28_harrington.mp3]

Thomas Harrington, Associate professor of Hispanic Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, discusses the history and ongoing changes of South American politics, waning US regional influence evidenced by the almost complete disappearance of puppet dictators, ethnic-European dominance of the social hierarchy, economic recovery in Argentina following the rejection of IMF dictates and how – despite high profile failures – there can be mutually beneficial free trade agreements.

MP3 here. (20:51)

Thomas Harrington is Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies at Trinity College in Hartford where he teaches courses on 20th and 21th Century Spanish Cultural History, Literature and Film. His areas of research expertise include modern Iberian nationalist movements, Contemporary Catalonia, and the history of migration between the peninsular “periphery” (Catalonia, Galicia, Portugal and the Basque Country) and the societies of the Caribbean and the Southern Cone. He has lived and worked in Madrid, Barcelona, Lisbon, Santiago de Compostela and Montevideo, Uruguay and speaks Spanish, Catalan, Galician and Portuguese. He is currently on leave and living in Uruguay.

Dilip Hiro

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_24_hiro.mp3]

Dilip Hiro, author of After Empire: The Birth of a Multipolar World, discusses the terminal decline of the still-mighty U.S. empire, the frequent defeat of American strong-arm tactics in foreign affairs and the rise of competing powers in the BRIC countries.

MP3 here. (17:34)

Born in the Indian sub-continent, Dilip Hiro was educated in India, Britain and America, where he received a master’s degree at Virginia Polytechnic & State University. He then settled in London in the mid-1960s, and became a full-time writer, journalist and commentator. He has published many books, the latest of which is After Empire: The Birth of a Multipolar World.

Karen Kwiatkowski

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_22_kwiatkowski.mp3]

Karen Kwiatkowski, columnist at lewrockwell.com and retired USAF lieutenant colonel, discusses the unauthorized hit squad of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan, why those who complain about “tying the hands” of the military are really asking for a free pass to murder civilians, how the high military suicide rate indicates government-approval for killing doesn’t lessen individual guilt caused by immoral actions and why an economic embargo against Washington is long overdue.

MP3 here. (19:10)

Karen Kwiatkowski, Ph.D., is a retired USAF Lieutenant Colonel, who spent her final years in uniform working at the Pentagon’s Near East/South Asia bureau (NESA). Her assignment was to work on policy papers for the Secretary of Defense and other top brass at the Pentagon. Shortly thereafter, she was assigned to a newly-formed bureau inside the Pentagon called the Office of Special Plans, which was created to help the Pentagon deal with issues in Iraq.

Deeply frustrated and alarmed, Kwiatkowski, still on active duty, took the unusual step of penning an anonymous column of internal Pentagon dissent that was posted on the Internet by former Colonel David Hackworth, America’s most decorated veteran. She lives with her freedom-loving family in the Shenandoah Valley, and among other things, writes for lewrockwell.com.

Winslow T. Wheeler

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_09_07_wheeler.mp3]

Winslow T. Wheeler, Director of the Straus Military Reform Project, discusses the Pentagon’s trillion dollar budget, rapidly increasing costs that have delayed much-needed repairs/replacements of aging military equipment, the post-9/11 rejuvenation of incompetent Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and how construction of new Virginia-class submarines is spread out in the interest of inefficiency and Congressional pork.

MP3 here. (20:23)

Winslow T. Wheeler writes regularly for Counterpunch.org. He spent 31 years working on Capitol Hill with senators from both political parties and the Government Accountability Office, specializing in national security affairs. Currently, he directs the Straus Military Reform Project of the Center for Defense Information in Washington. He is author of Wastrels of Defense: How Congress Sabotages U.S. Security and the editor of a new anthology: America’s Defense Meltdown: Pentagon Reform for President Obama and the New Congress.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_31_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses how central banks print fiat money to pay for world wars that would otherwise be impossible to finance, the enormous resources at the U.S. government’s disposal to delay an economic reckoning, why WalMart is a net gain to society, the division between those who live off the state and those who support it (albeit unwillingly) and why more super-rich dynastic families are needed to compete for power with the state.

MP3 here. (43:20)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He is the author of The Left, The Right and The State and served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Fred Branfman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_30_branfman.mp3]

Fred Branfman, author of the Alternet article “Mass Assassinations Lie at the Heart of America’s Military Strategy in the Muslim World,” discusses several common-sense reasons “why they hate us” (it isn’t our freedom), how the “McChrystal ratio” exposes the bankruptcy of COIN strategy, the incredibly broad scope – both in number of forces employed and geographic space – of U.S. assassination policy, why (unlike CIA ops) these killings don’t require Presidential approval or reports to Congress, how Petraeus’s strategy seems focused on his short term career goals, why taking on 1.3 billion Muslims is national suicide and how the upcoming Republican midterm election sweep will hasten U.S. economic and societal collapse.

Here is the 3 minute video of John Pilger interviewing former CIA officer Duane Clarridge, who is presently advising CIA assassination efforts in Pakistan.

MP3 here. (51:34)

Fred Branfman is a writer and longtime activist who directed the Indochina Resource Center during the war in Indochina. He edited “Voices From the Plain of Jars: Life Under an Air War” (Harper & Row, 1972), that exposed the U.S. secret air war in Laos. Visit his Web site.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_08_27_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses his article “Mosque Demagoguery Is Bipartisan” and the linkage between property rights and First Amendment rights, why the abandonment of the dollar will lead to an inflationary depression and why Dennis Kucinich’s anti-assassination bill is a redundancy (but deserving of support nonetheless).

MP3 here. (13:00)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and Freedom Under Siege. His archived columns for Antiwar.com are here.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_07_27_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former Antiwar Radio co-contributor and author of The Dollar Meltdown : Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses the sacrifice of social programs to preserve the sacrosanct Pentagon budget, how American insularity breeds ignorance, the worthless 2300-page financial reform bill passed by Congress, how alternate systems of money and commerce will bypass Fed control and why oil and gold will hold their value against a declining dollar.

MP3 here. (39:38)

Charles Goyette was a longtime award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_07_29_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses the FBI’s flagrant abuse of national security letters that apparently entitles them to even more eavesdropping power, the lawsuits and sabotage efforts likely heading WikiLeaks’ way, how media sycophancy enables the know-nothing Congress and why Bob Barr’s 2008 Presidential Committee needs help paying its bills.

MP3 here. (20:23) Transcript below.

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

—————————–

Transcript – Scott Horton interviews James Bovard July 30, 2010

Scott Horton: All right y’all, welcome back to the show. It’s Antiwar Radio. I’m Scott Horton. I’m joined on the phone by my friend Jim Bovard. He’s the author of The Farm Fiasco and The Fair Trade Fraud and Feeling Your Pain and Freedom in Chains, Terrorism and Tyranny, The Bush Betrayal, and Attention Deficit Democracy is so good – it’s a couple of years old now, but still – man what an awesome book, Attention Deficit Democracy. I’m sure I’ve left half of them off the list there, but that’s Jim Bovard’s work. He is the most accomplished libertarian journalist in history and of course he’s a fellow over at the Future of Freedom Foundation as well. Hey Jim, how’s it going man?

James Bovard: Hey, Scott, thanks for having me on the air.

Horton: Well I appreciate you joining us again on the show today.

Bovard: Hey, it was a really great interview that you did yesterday with Julian Assange. It’s great that you guys are putting the transcripts online. You know, I’ve been hearing a lot of stuff in the Washington press corps and the Washington Post about kind of telling you that the release a couple of days ago wasn’t as big as the Pentagon Papers. It’s nice to see from your interview there’s a whole lot more coming, and you know this game is only starting and it’s getting better all the time.

Horton: Well, thanks very much. Two things there: First of all, Angela Keaton gets the credit for producing this show and getting all the guests lined up, like you right now, but like Julian yesterday as well – she gets all the credit for that. And then, secondly, the transcripts are thanks to a small group of volunteers I’ve been able to put together. I think at least some of them have told me not to say their names or whatever, so I guess I won’t say their names, but anyway there are about five people who are working together to put together the transcriptions and then go over them and get them in final draft form for me, and then, as you mentioned, they got that Julian Assange interview transcript together, ready to post in real time with the archive of the audio last night. So I’m very thankful to all of them for that. It’s really something having the transcripts up.

Bovard: Yeah, and it’s so helpful for folks who might not want to listen or folks who are more print oriented, kind of like geezers like myself.

Horton: Well and it’s a matter of time too, you know.

Bovard: That’s true. That’s true.

Horton: You listen to a half-hour interview, you can read it in four minutes, you know?

Bovard: That’s true, and something which is nice about being able to read it is that you can annotate it.

Horton: Right, yeah, copy, paste.

Bovard: And there are certain quotes – like the thing a half an hour ago, I did a blog on your interview, and it was nice to be able to pull out a couple of sentences from his comments and just pop them right in there, so…

Horton: Right, well and you think about some of the things I get, former CIA agents and former National Security Council staffers and other people who will say on the show – a lot of those things could be news stories themselves, and I think now that we’re getting them in print, and especially fast like this, maybe we can get to building some news releases around them. You know, because Flynt Leverett on this show, the things that he says – that’s a news story itself, that this guy Flynt Leverett told this guy Scott Horton X and such.

Bovard: Well, yeah, but the downside to all this is it means you’re going to have more trouble with groupies.

Horton: Yeah! Well that’s always been a real problem around here, believe me.

Bovard: Well, I saw it happen at that Future of Freedom conference. My goodness, you know, it was dangerous standing close to you. You know? I felt like I had to do my middle-linebacker, you know, always be on defense.

Horton: Well, it’s nice to know you have my back, Jim.

Bovard: All right.

Horton: Hey, by the way, when are they doing another one of those Future of Freedom Foundation conferences? That thing was awesome, man.

Bovard: Good question. Don’t know. That’s a good question for Bumper [Future of Freedom Foundation president Jacob Hornberger] next time you talk to him. They’ve been cooking some other stuff up, so I don’t know.

Horton: You know, people go on the YouTube and look – that was in 2007, right?

Bovard: There was one in 2007. There was one in 2008.

Horton: Okay. Well maybe that was the 2008 one. Or maybe – I don’t know. Yeah, I guess that was 2008. So, anyway, go and look at the YouTube y’all, and there are excellent speeches by Ron Paul, and Stephen Kinzer, and Andrew Bacevich, and you’re one of them too, aren’t you?

Bovard: I was one of them. There was Glenn Greenwald…

Horton: Karen Kwiatkowski. Yeah, Greenwald. Anthony Gregory gave a great speech about why it’s immoral to drop high explosives on peoples’ heads from your airplane. Yeah, it was awesome – always is. And of course Jacob’s speech was great too.

Bovard: Yeah, he’s a first-class hell raiser.

Horton: All right. Well, so, we got to cover some news or something important or something, so let’s talk about this WikiLeaks thing. That’s kind of where we started here with the Julian Assange. I’m trying to be hopeful that – and this was going to be one of my questions for him before I ran out of time yesterday, and I don’t know, he doesn’t have any inside information on this, I guess. But what I’m hopeful about, Jimand I wonder whether you think that this will be the case, is that WikiLeaks will inspire competition, and more people, more computer geniuses with encryption skills and whatever are going to figure out ways to do their own little separate WikiLeaks.

Bovard: That would be great. I mean, as long as there’s some type of quality control. Because I would assume at some point that people inside of the government are going to be trying to feed false information through the different people that are sending information to the various –

Horton: Well, the more the merrier, right?

Bovard: Absolutely.

Horton: I mean that’s where we get our checks and balances in the market. And, well look, as we’ve been discussing, as I think you brought up – yeah, because you’re talking about the Washington Post there and the way that they treat this thing – we have to come up with our own journalism. Ray McGovern yesterday called it the “Fifth Estate”“the Ether”and the establishment can’t do nothing about it. It’s the Internet. It’s CampaignForLiberty.com (I’m looking at your article, “The Fraud of ‘Big-Picture’ Thinking” right now). It’s Antiwar.com. It’s WikiLeaks.org and Salon.com/Opinion/Greenwald. And this is the future of journalism in the world.

Bovard: I hope you’re right. I’m not entirely confident the government cannot find some way to sabotage it. I would also – I will be curious to see what they try to do as far as lawsuits; I wouldn’t be surprised if someone in Congress tries to pass a law that would somehow attach liability to people who pass on government confidential documents. I mean, there’s all kinds of peril laying out there, and it was surprising to see some of these liberal mainstream journalists prior to this most recent leak kind of taking shots at WikiLeaks. I mean, it’s almost as if some of the liberals thought that they should be a team player, and I’m thinking, you know, it doesn’t make sense to trust the government to tell us the truth because the government’s had plenty of opportunities and it hasn’t done it.

Horton: Yeah, well, we’re doomed.

Bovard: Well, I don’t know that we’re doomed, but I expect that there’ll be a lot of surprises and tussles coming up here. But it’s very encouraging to hear that those folks have got a lot more surprises in the pipeline, and you know, the thing that’s shocking to a degree is how much the established mediayou know, there have been individual journalists who have done a great job in Afghanistan – people like Carlotta Gall for the New York Times and some other folks, but so much of the mainstream press coverage – well, it’s been government-fed, which is why that Rolling Stone story was such a shock. It’s like the evidence was out there, but it was almost as if some of the journalists were bending over backwards not to connect the dots.

Horton: Yeah, well and you’re right. I mean, you do have Carlotta Gall and a lot of other good reporters at the Times and even at the Post and other places, but it’s the narrative that sticks, you know? No matter how many times Carlotta Gall reports about, I don’t know, Pakistani help for the Taliban, or whatever, and it’s the kind of thing that people who are paying attention already know – the narrative really never changes from, whatever, “It’s hard work but we’re making progressall we got to do is surge some more troops in there and everything will end up going our way.”

Bovard: Well, yeah. I mean there is a fair amount of that. The interesting thing about Gall is she had the first bombshell story on the U.S. use of torture after 9/11, using it there in Afghanistan, but if memory serves, the New York Times editors basically sat on the article for a long time and then kind of buried it in the middle of the A section or the front section, and did not give it anywhere near the play. And if the New York Times had not flinched on that, it might have been more difficult for the Bush administration to make an institution of torture in so many different places around the world. And it’s surprising to me that Carlotta Gall has not gotten a lot more credit for what she’s done, because – well, anyhow, that’s another story.

Horton: Well you know when you talk about the Democrats turning on WikiLeaks. I was just looking at Greg Sargent’s blog, actually at the Washington PostGlenn Greenwald had a link over to it – and it’s this Jason Chaffetz, a Republican congressman who voted against the Afghan war funding, is being attacked for betraying the troops by his Democratic opponent. And on down the chain of BS we go, just switching roles back and forth between these two stupid parties.

All right, y’all, it’s Jim Bovard the genius on the show, on the line. We’ll be right back after this.

* * * * *

Horton: All right, y’all. Welcome back to the show, it’s Antiwar Radio, I’m on the phone with former Kelly Girl typist Jim Bovard.

Bovard: [laughs]

Horton: He’s the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, it’s really a great book, you guys really ought to read it. I know I sit here and I tell you about all these books you got to read all the time. I can’t even read all the books I got to read, and that’s my job. But this is one that you actually go and get and read, not just hear about: Attention Deficit Democracy. And, yeah, he knows it’s not supposed to be a democracy, it’s just a stupid title.

Bovard: [laughs] Oh thanks, that’s a great plug.

Horton: Yeah, yeah, quote that one on the back of the next one, you know?

Bovard: Sounds good to me.

Horton: All right, so let’s talk about –

Bovard: – Bob Barr has a blurb, but go ahead.

Horton: Oh, yeah, yeah, no doubt. Hey, by the way, did that guy ever give you the money he owed you? Ok, nevermind.

Bovard: Oh, now there’s a question. Things are proceeding on the litigation front.

Horton: Well the guy is a former federal prosecutor, so I don’t expect him to have any honor or anything, but I guess we’ll see how that goes. Well, yeah, and speaking of that, I want to pick on the FBI.

Bovard: Go for it.

Horton: I know they’re one of your favorite government agencies to pick on. These guys – well, two things. First of all, it says that they want to just be able to seize whatever information they want from any ISP in the country without any warrant. But I thought they could already do that, because of the Patriot Act, because of the National Security Letters and administrative subpoenas and so forth, so I was hoping you’d set me straight as to exactly how that works. And then the second thing is, all the cops were cheating on the test about when you’re allowed to seize what – to see whether they’re allowed to be cops in the first place.

Bovard: Well this is – yeah, the second story, the FBI agents probably apparently cheated en masse as far as being able to answer the question about when they’re allowed to do these – seize people’s private information without a warrant, but that’s a harmless error because it works out well for the government. And the second one – front page of the Washington Post today – the Obama administration is pushing to allow the FBI to seize far more personal information about people’s computer use without using a warrant. This is basically a change in the standard which the National Security Letters would be used for.

National Security letters have already been a complete disaster. The FBI has used those to put the Fourth Amendment through a shredder. We have no idea how many innocent people’s privacy has been violated by that, because there have been some very good inspector general reports, but the actual damage to privacy is far greater, and the government leaves out all the details, so we don’t know what the government did with the information it got. And so the folks in the Obama White House think the answer is to give the FBI a much bigger vacuum cleaner and basically change the law to make it much clearer that the FBI is entitled to far more sweeping information on people’s Internet use, the times and dates they sent email, the subject lines, and also possibly a person’s browser history. So if someone out there clicks on Antiwar.com, that could go on their permanent federal FBI record.

Horton: Well look, I think everybody ought to understand already that it does go on their permanent National Security Agency file forever, if not the FBI, at this point.

Bovard: Well, it’s really hard to know – well, you know, sometimes bureaucrats share, and we have no idea how much information is being passed back and forth.

Horton: Right, I mean, that’s the real concern, right? I mean, hell, Jim, if we left it up to the FBI to build the Cray supercomputer to enslave us all, we’ll be free forever, but that’s not the problem. The problem is that you change an “and” to a “to” in some legislation somewhere, and now the National Security Agency’s powers over all of us are available to the cops who actually can use these things in court against us, and the National Security Agency – I guess they could contract out a secret hit with the CIA to kill you or whatever, but they don’t have any police power over us here other than through the FBI.

Bovard: Well, the FBI or perhaps other federal agents or federal agencies, because we don’t really know how much else, how many other laws are being broken right now. It’s been a long time since federal law enforcement was on a leash, and we really don’t know who they’re ravaging. But it’s appalling to see the Obama Administration, “Mr. Constitutional Lawyer,” coming in there and just pushing these things, which are just one more wish list for law enforcement and the intelligence types and one more trampling of privacy. I mean, it is an outrage that these folks want to give more power to the government on this when they have not yet disclosed how the government abused the power it already had.

Horton: And even if you check out the Priest-Arkin version of the national security state in the Post, they’re saying, “It’s out of control.” I think that was the title of the first piece of that last week was “Out of control, National Security State” – no one’s in charge, certainly not elected representatives of anybody.

Bovard: Well and Congress is supposed to have oversight. I would wager heavily that probably less than a third of the members of Congress even read that Washington Post series. Because members of Congress almost never read. I mean, you know, it’s like – well, anyhow.

Horton: Well, you know I’m actually going to interview Barbara Lee later today.

Bovard: Oh good!

Horton: It was supposed to be at the beginning of the show, and that was going to be one of my questions for her, is, “How dim is the average member of Congress?” I mean not even in the sense of, “Do they disagree with me about X, Y or Z?” Lord knows Barbara Lee and I disagree about all kinds of things, I’m sure. But it seems to me like most of these members of congress, Jim – and I know you’ve covered most of them live there at the Capitolit seems like they don’t even care about stuff. They’re not even interested in what’s going on.

Bovard: Right. Yes. I mean, something that you might want to do with Barbara Lee is ask her what her assessment is of how much the average congressman knows about what the government is doing either in foreign policy or in the surveillance stuff. And ask her if her fellow members of Congress ever read anything about these things, because that might get a very interesting answer.

Horton: Yeah, I mean, I think it’s pretty obvious to listen to these people talk that they’re a tenth as informed as the average reader of Antiwar.com. You could even tell, in the Bush years, there were times where you could tell that George Bush actually knew less than the readers at Antiwar.com. Whatever it was they were telling him didn’t include a lot of the story.

Bovard: Scott, Scott, Scott, this is damning with faint praise as far as your readers –

Horton: Well, no, I don’t meanI mean what he’d even been briefed on.

Bovard: “Knows more than George W.” I mean, this is something to pat yourself on the back about. It’s like being a Rhodes Scholar these days.

Horton: No, no, you know what I mean, where he’s just talking about – I wish I had a good example, but, you know, going on about Iran and Iraq, and you can tell he really doesn’t know that he’s been fighting for Iran in Iraq for years on end. I mean, most of these guys knew they were lying when they said something like that. Nobody ever even told him, you know? All he had to do was get a laptop and start googling, he’d have found out a lot more than Condoleezza Rice ever let him know.

Bovard: Well, and the thing that’s unfortunate – it was so rare in an interview with Bush that some journalist would ask him a question that would actually test his factual knowledge, because that would tell us a lot more as far as whether he had any clue in Hades as far as what was going on. But the journalists almost never did that. There was a short little Irish lady who interviewed him in the summer of 2004 and Bush just had a snit because she was pushing him on torture, and the White House just about fell apart on that.

Horton: Right, yeah, how dare she? And you know, this is the symptom of the whole larger thingI hate to even bring this up. But I obviously don’t want to talk about the subject, but it’s an example/side-issue thing – is the upcoming marriage – apparently, I hadn’t read anything but a headline, can’t avoid them – the upcoming marriage of the daughter of two presidents ago. And this is like some kind of like the – when I was a kid and Lady Diana got married to Prince Charles or whatever. I mean, really, I’m supposed to care about Bill Clinton’s daughter? This is news? It’s like we do live in England with this kind of weird pseudoroyalty that they got from Arkansas.

Bovard: Well, yeah, and it’s similar to the British Royalty because it’s fairly inbred.

Horton: [laughs] Yeah, indeed. I always did think that – well, never mind, I’m not going to say it.

Bovard: [laughs] Okay.

Horton: I had something really funny I was going to say, but never mind.

Bovard: Okay, well, we’ll just try to keep up to you.

Horton: It would have been worth that laugh I got out of you.

Bovard: All right, well, you know I was waiting for a zinger.

Horton: Well, yeah, there was a zinger but I stifled it, man.

Bovard: A Bill Hicks cyber zinger – You know, I was looking for some Bill Hicks caliber right there.

Horton: Yeah, no. There’s nothing Bill Hicks caliber here, man. Anyway, we try. Well, so, hey, here’s this too, man, is the Iraq waryou think that’s ever going to end?

Bovard: Well, there’s still quite a few Iraqis alive, so um…

Horton: Yeah, I guess we still got a job to do.

Bovard: Well, and it’s fascinating how the mainstream American media has basically gone with this notion that the U.S. wonand it’s like a hell of a definition of victory.

Horton: And it really has worked – You know Biden here says the headline, “U.S. Troops Halted Chaos and Destruction in Iraq.” They really got away with that. We really live in a world upside down.

Bovard: Well, it almost makes you cynical.

Horton: Yeah, almostwell good thing you’re not yet. Everybody go look at JimBovard.com, would you? And thanks, Jim.

Bovard: Hey, thanks for having me on, Scott.

Horton: We’ll be back.

Sheldon Richman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_07_12_richman.mp3]

Sheldon Richman, senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation, discusses the unsustainable expense of US empire, the “political transaction costs” that shield government from scrutiny and protest, lack of emphasis on foreign policy at the Freedom Fest 2010 conference and why defense spending is the trillion pound gorilla in the (budget deficit) room.

MP3 here. (18:47)

Sheldon Richman is editor of The Freeman, published by The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York, and serves as senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of FFF’s award-winning book Separating School & State: How to Liberate America’s Families; Your Money or Your Life: Why We Must Abolish the Income Tax; and FFF’s newest book Tethered Citizens: Time to Repeal the Welfare State.

Calling for the abolition, not the reform, of public schooling. Separating School & State has become a landmark book in both libertarian and educational circles. In his column in the Financial Times, Michael Prowse wrote: “I recommend a subversive tract, Separating School & State by Sheldon Richman of the Cato Institute, a Washington think tank… . I also think that Mr. Richman is right to fear that state education undermines personal responsibility…”

Mr. Richman’s articles on population, federal disaster assistance, international trade, education, the environment, American history, foreign policy, privacy, computers, and the Middle East have appeared in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, American Scholar, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Washington Times, Insight, Cato Policy Report, Journal of Economic Development, The Freeman, The World & I, Reason, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Middle East Policy, Liberty magazine, and other publications. He is a contributor to the Fortune Encyclopedia of Economics.

A former newspaper reporter and former senior editor at the Cato Institute, Mr. Richman is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Robert Higgs

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_07_01_higgs.mp3]

Robert Higgs, senior fellow at the Independent Institute, discusses the tiresome rants of gloom and doom survivalists, why those who long for a government or economic collapse should be careful what they wish for, why federal spending can’t continue at the current level without a bond market revolt, the none-too-encouraging result of the Soviet Union’s collapse and why the US empire may face gradual cutbacks instead of outright abolition.

MP3 here. (28:55) Transcript below.

Robert Higgs is Senior Fellow in Political Economy for The Independent Institute and Editor of the Institute’s quarterly journal The Independent Review. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, and he has taught at the University of Washington, Lafayette College, Seattle University, and the University of Economics, Prague. He has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University and Stanford University, and a fellow for the Hoover Institution and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Higgs is the editor of The Independent Institute books Opposing the Crusader State, The Challenge of Liberty, Re-Thinking Green, Hazardous to Our Health? and Arms, Politics, and the Economy, plus the volume Emergence of the Modern Political Economy.

His authored books include Neither Liberty Nor Safety, Depression, War, and Cold War, Politická ekonomie strachu (The Political Economy of Fear, in Czech), Resurgence of the Warfare State, Against Leviathan, The Transformation of the American Economy 1865-1914, Competition and Coercion, and Crisis and Leviathan. A contributor to numerous scholarly volumes, he is the author of more than 100 articles and reviews in academic journals.

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Scott Horton interviews Robert Higgs, July 7, 2010

Scott Horton: Okay, y’all, welcome back to the show. It’s Antiwar Radio. I’m Scott Horton, and I’m joined on the line by the great Robert Higgs from The Independent Institute. Let me click on the right thing here so I can read you some of the books he wrote: Crisis and Leviathan, Depression, War, and Cold War, Against Leviathan, Resurgence of the Warfare State, Opposing the Crusader State, Neither Liberty Nor Safety, The Challenge Of Liberty, Arms, Politics, and the Economy… On and on like that it goes. He is the editor of The Independent Review. You can check out The Independent Institute at Independent.org, and, boy, this guy is more libertarian than all of y’all. He doesn’t even like it when the government does bad things to other government people, which makes him more libertarian than me, even. Welcome back to the show, Bob, how are you doing?

Robert Higgs: I’m doing fine, Scott.

Horton: Yeah, I think you’re the only libertarian I ever heard say: “I am absolutely opposed to Dick Cheney being tried for war crimes. There shouldn’t be any federal trials at all ever again for anyone.”

Higgs: Well, I don’t remember saying that, but I’d actually prefer that he were struck by lightning, and that could save us some expense, perhaps.

Horton: Well, I have a witness. It was Anthony Gregory, your colleague at The Independent Institute. He can verify this.

Higgs: I trust him more than I trust my own memory.

Horton: Yeah, well, and if you’re smart, more than you trust me too, so, we’ll double check with him. All right, now – and I know you’re smart because I read your stuff. Let’s talk about “Which End, If Any, is Near?” Which end, if any, is near, Bob?

Higgs: [laughs] I wish I knew, Scott. I assume you’re referring to a little piece I wrote recently which was a kind of a lament, I think, about the proliferation of doomsday forecasts or expectations or households or whatever they are that have appeared, particularly in the last year or so. They’re all over the web now, and on certain Websites you get hardly anything else. And some sites have more or less switched over from doing libertarian analysis to doing gloom and doom and survivalism and talking about which guns and ammo are better and so forth, so there’s been a lot of this stuff going on, and at some point I found it more than I could take, and so I had to express the opinion that I think most of it is extremely overwrought.

Horton: Well, I guess I hate to say this, but I’m sort of hopeful about an economic collapse. What Ron Paul always says is that, you know, these horrible policies, meaning the complete and total destruction of any semblance of the rule of law, especially at the national level, but really across the society in terms of at least the way it binds the power of the government (obviously it still applies to us) the endless warfare around the world, that this is only going to end, not because people listen to him but because the dollar’s going to break, because our empire’s going to fall apart like the Soviet Union. And I always figure that’s better than going out like the Germans or the Japanese.

Higgs: A lot of unfortunate things may happen. I’m not at all arguing against that. In fact I think some unfortunate things are virtually certain to happen. From one point of view they may not be unfortunate at all. For example, the government’s promises to pay benefits under Social Security, and particularly the Medicare part of Social Security, cannot be kept, so if you know arithmetic, you already know that at some point these programs are going to collapse in the sense that they will be unable to pay what they promise people and therefore in one way or another they will not make those payments. So, yes, that sort of thing is easy to not only imagine but actually to expect, and people would be well advised to plan for it, but there are a lot of other aspects of gloom and doom being discussed that are by no means sure things. Although I think the dollar conceivably might collapse at some point, I think the odds are strongly against it, and in history there have been many worse-managed currencies that managed to hang on for a very long time, and I won’t be surprised if the dollar turns out to be that way too. That doesn’t mean the dollar is going to hold its value. It almost certainly will continue to depreciate quicker or slower over time. And again that’s something that people should expect and plan for, but that’s a different matter from pell-mell abandonment of the dollar. I think, too, Scott that it’s worth recalling that when people long for a kind of overall collapse of the economy, they should think twice about that, because historically collapses like that are virtually never the occasions in which liberty comes out ahead at the end. In my work and in other people’s work that I’ve read about but not really participated in doing the research for, it seems to me that social collapses and particularly government collapses generally portend even greater totalitarianism.

Horton: Well, sure, and your book, Depression, War, and Cold War, as the mark of all of that.

Higgs: The tsarist regime was horrible. But the Bolsheviks were worse. The Weimar German regime was horrible. But the Nazis were worse. The people should think twice when they hope for collapse.

Horton: Yeah, no, I’m with you, and especially when, you know, the American people are so detached from reality in so many ways now and you can see somebody like Glenn Beck take a perfectly Ron Paulian argument that, “All we’ve got to do is not be afraid and just start doing the right thing,” and then he turns the right thing into, “Let’s persecute the poor and the brown and the powerless,” instead of “Let’s end the war and shore up the dollar and reinstate the Bill of Rights,” which is how Ron finishes the sentence, you know. But, but you take a Glenn Beck, and if economic times got much worse, that whole side of the Tea Party movement could be a real kind of fascist thing, I think. It scares me.

Higgs: I share your view in that regard. I think we need to remember that when there is some kind of revolution or thorough-going collapse of the political order, what happens next really depends heavily on the kind of ideological stance that people have and what kinds of preparation and schemes have been made by activists as well. There are sometimes little groups like the Bolsheviks in old Russia. They didn’t amount to much, you know, their numbers were trivial, but they were more or less prepared to do something and take action when an opportunity arose, and so they managed to leverage that crisis into their domination of a huge society. So if we’ve got people out there who are laying their plans and are well prepared to be unscrupulous, then they have a much stronger chance of coming out on top of the heap at the end. But most of all what will happen depends on what people will be willing to tolerate. And in general when there’s some kind of collapse of society or economy, almost everybody becomes tremendously fearful and they look for salvation. And where they look for salvation and how they expect to find it hinges entirely on the dominant ideology those people hold at the time, and right now I’m afraid to say that the dominant ideology of the United States is anything but propitious for the cause of liberty.

Horton: Yeah.

Higgs: So, you know, I could easily see that if things fell apart, we’d come out of it in a few years even worse off than we are now.

Horton: I don’t know what propitious means, but it sounds right.

Higgs: [laughs]

Horton: I’ll tell you. Well, you know, the Soviet Union, that was certainly a benefit when the Soviet Union fell apart, and yet millions starved and the collapse of their system was absolutely devastating for the people of Russia and continues to be. And, hell, in America, we got FDR the last time we went through a real depression, so…

Higgs: Yeah, I think…

Horton: Hold it right there, Bob. I’m sorry, we’re going to have come back right after this break.

Horton: All right, y’all, welcome back to the show. It’s Antiwar Radio. I’m Scott Horton, and I’m so selfish, I’m sitting here pining for an economic collapse just because I’m sick and tired of talking about war all day, every day, and yet Robert Higgs is saying, “Be careful what you wish for, young man,” something along those lines. Now, and then I guess your real point, Bob, is that the American empire is not going to collapse anytime soon. It’s going to be just like when Harry Browne died when I die, 50-60 years from now or whatever, everything is still the Permanent Crisis.

Higgs: Well, I don’t think the empire’s on the verge of collapse, Scott, but I do think, again, that it’s likely that financial constraints will bring about some changes, and in this case, probably some retrenchment. The U.S. government in the last few years has been mismanaged so badly that it’s put itself in a position that it can’t maintain indefinitely. Now, the people who run the system, I think at least some of them understand this, and that’s why they’re busily getting together in Toronto and having active discussions all the time how to disengage from some of these measures they’ve taken in the past two years to stimulate, as they imagine, the economy in this financial debacle and the recession.

But even though some of them appreciate the need for them to retrench, particularly to stop adding so much debt every year until they reach the point where the capital markets rebel against them, that that will be the real constrain on them. Because at some point the people that buy these bonds will simply lose interest in buying any more of them and in fact will want to hold fewer of them, and when that turnaround comes, and I think we may be in the neighborhood of such a turnaround right now, these governments will not be able any longer to continue spending at the same rate that they’ve been spending without financing their expenditures in even more troublesome ways such as by outright inflation of the money stock. So, if they reach the point where the financial constraint really begins to bite, they’re going to have to reduce expenditures, and that will almost certainly have to include the enormous expenditures on maintenance of the U.S. empire.

So I think there’s some hope, reason for hope, that the empire will be diminished in future years. I don’t see, with my understanding of political realities of the world, that it’s going to be given up all at once, or easily, because a great many people are going to fight to keep it, but I think the fundamental forces that hold up these governments, the U.S. government and the other advanced ones in the world, are now running against them. And so those forces ultimately will probably produce some results in the direction of retrenchment. I think it will be easier, ultimately, for the U.S. government to reduce the size of the empire than it will be for the U.S. government to cut down on old people’s pensions and medical care and so forth, because that’s going to generate just tremendous opposition politically.

Horton: Well now, ironically speaking and so forth, what role does the empire of bases play in propping up the dollar in the sense of impressing upon foreign leaders how they probably ought to still want to buy American securities?

Higgs: I don’t think it plays much of a role, Scott. You know, there’s a certain amount of intimidation that is part and parcel of the U.S. empire, and so this so-called central bank cooperation, for example, is a reflection of the clout that the U.S. brings to the table whatever the issue happens to be, whether it’s financial cooperation or military cooperation or anything else, but most of the people who hold U.S. debt and the debt of other governments are private individuals and institutions, and I think these people are practically all living in a world of very mobile capital. They can, with a push of a button, move tremendous sums of money anywhere in the world very quickly, and I simply don’t think they’re going to be intimidated by how many bases the U.S. happens to be maintaining in Somewhereistan.

Horton: In other words, these [bases] are simply a gross and net loss. There’s no – you know, there’s a whole theory that part of the reason that America wanted to attack Iraq is because he wanted to start buying his oil in euros and that kind of thing, and here they wanted to spend trillions of dollars doing a regime change to, in essence, prop up the dollar. But you think that probably doesn’t hold water then?

Higgs: I’ve never thought there was much to that idea, frankly. First of all, the magnitudes are trivial, when you look at the amounts of money at stake.

Horton: There is the example, though, right?

Higgs: There might be an example, but again the U.S. can invade Iraq fairly readily compared to its ability to invade and wreak havoc in a lot of other parts of the world. So I think other factors lie much more strongly behind the U.S. invasion of Iraq. But in any event, I think the empire is and always has been for the U.S. a net loser, but it’s not maintained for its aggregated benefits and costs, it’s maintained for the benefits it brings to the people who run it or are cozy with those who run it. So, so, it’s a ripoff.. It’s like virtually everything the government does. It goes about under an umbrella of misrepresentation about national security and weapons of mass destruction la la la la la, but that’s just for the boobeoisie. The people who actually run the system are interested in much more definite things, and I think in most of the cases where it looks like a screw-up for U.S. foreign policy, or the empire in general, these people who run the system still come out smelling like roses.

Horton: Yeah, of course. You’re the one who takes the blame. I saw you on C-SPAN, you’re the guy who got us into this mess, you mean old man.

Higgs: [laughs]

Horton: Now, which by the way, I highly recommend Bob Higgs on C-SPAN, Robert Higgs on C-SPAN, the three-hour call-in episode, to anyone who feels like gut laughing all day. Or crying, whichever you prefer. But now here’s the thing, though, we run up against what you’re saying about when times get bad, rather than the people who run the state retrenching, it tends to be a “Crisis and Leviathan” situation. We go into the Great Depression, everybody blames Bob Higgs and the libertarian free market for causing the problem, and what we need is another New Deal and another New Deal. I’m looking at your article entitled, “Crisis and Leviathan” at the Independent Institute, which is also the name of your book, talking about the revolution within the form that we’re undergoing right now. While everybody’s watching the oil spill, there’s a revolution inside the White House and inside the Congress as we speak, Bob. And if it’s okay, I’d like to keep you one more segment and ask you about that.

Higgs: Okay.

Horton: Thanks. Hang tight. Antiwar Radio.

Horton: All right, y’all, welcome back to the show, Antiwar Radio, and lucky me, lucky you, we’ve got Robert Higgs to stay one more segment with us. He’s at The Independent Institute, that’s Independent.org, the author of Crisis and Leviathan, and, Bob, I guess this is where we get back to ideology. When a crisis comes, are we going to start rolling back some of our excesses, like, you know, all the money spent torturing people to death, or are we just going to have more of what it seems like we’re in the midst of right now, which when Garet Garrett talked about Franklin Roosevelt back in the ’30s, he called it a revolution within the form. He said, “All the revolutionaries are inside the White House and everybody else is outside the gate saying ‘Stop, stop.'” So, it seems like that’s where we’re already at. The dollar, if there’s a run on the dollar, like they say, I guess the crackup boom is the worse case scenario, then what do we get? Just military dictatorship?

Higgs: Well, I wouldn’t rule that out. They’ve certainly made preparation for that if they need it. Of course they would prefer not to have things get to that point, I’m sure, but I don’t think the people who control the U.S. government are going to just walk away from their power ever. I think they’ll do what they feel is necessary to retain their power, and I think they are unscrupulous people, and if they have to do horrible things, that’s what they’ll do. So, that’s the main reason I think why we all ought to be hoping that we don’t have any kind of a breakdown of the existing order because we’re likely to have a really fierce, terrible response to it from the government. And to make things work, a great many Americans will back the government when it takes these actions. As you know, governments always identify certain scapegoats and people to blame and hold responsible, and whether its economic royalists or communists or whatever it happens to be at the time, you identify the enemy, you start smearing everybody who gets in your way and putting people in prison right and left. So, I think our government is perfectly capable of reacting fiercely to the prospect of losing its grip on power. Now, that doesn’t mean they’ll never lose their grip, I simply think that when they do, and I think ultimately they probably will, it will be a much more gradual process of decay in which more and more people, as it were, simply walk away from them, refuse to cooperate any longer, withdraw their support, and eventually behave in such a noncooperative, evasive and sabotaging manner that the government can no longer accumulate resources and can no longer command enough allegiance to do its will.

Horton: Well, and that’s really what happened with the Soviet Union, right?

Higgs: I think so. In that case, it was also a revolution from the top, of course, even though many people in the lower levels of Soviet society were surely unhappy, and hardly anybody at that point believed in communism any longer as an ideological object or, you know, the loyalty to communism had pretty much dissolved except amongst some of the very old people. But I think what the Soviet power elite realized at some point in the 1980s was that the system was doomed and that there was a way for them to come out on top as it went under. And so they did that. They snatched the state property they had controlled by various devices, and they created a lot of billionaires among themselves, and they retained a lot of control over what was worth something in the society, like the natural resource deposits and means of marketing, and they still pretty much run the system. They renamed the KGB, and they call the new system capitalism, and whoopee. But as you mentioned before, the mass of the people continue to be in very bad economic condition there. And I think there has been some improvement. I think things for the masses of the Russians are a little better than they were under communism, but certainly it’s been a top down kind of regime change that has much less substance than it appears to have.

Horton: Well now, it’s funny because, I’m looking back on this thing, and it seems like FDR had this massive failure of a New Deal for a decade or so, and then he got us into a war, because that’s what you do when all else fails is you start conscripting people, that’ll bring that unemployment rate down one way or another there, and, you know, just dump them en masse on machine gun nests on top of cliffs and stuff, that kind of thing. But we never stopped warring since 1941, in that war that FDR got us in, and now it’s brought us to this point, and we see that there’s a pseudo New Deal going on with the government intervening more than ever in terms of the markets and taking over companies and bossing them around and these kinds of things. But so does that mean that we have another major full-scale, you know, World War III coming up – I don’t know, Obama or the next guy’s only way out of the mess they’ve got us in so far – or are we at the end of this cycle?

Higgs: I think conditions are different this time, partly because the configuration of power in the world as a whole is different. The wars that we may get in now are wars like attacks on Iran. That’s a very different thing from the United States and its allies going to war against Germany, Japan and their allies in World War II.

Horton: Sure.

Higgs: But those were powerful nation states that could really put up a fight. The U.S. makes war now against people that it would appear it’s bound to defeat, and yet it can’t. That’s a kind of paradox of the U.S. empire, that it loses all of these wars of empire, because what it tries to do is impose its will on societies that don’t want to be subjects of the United States, and so they keep sabotaging U.S. control of their societies in one way or another until finally the political will wears down among the American political establishment and they give it up or make some kind of arrangement like the one in Korea. But it always ends. The shooting stops and life goes on. But these post World War II wars have all been – even though Korea and Vietnam were not negligible in any sense, but relative to World War II much smaller affairs and aimed at much different objectives, I think. This was not the same situation Roosevelt was confronting in 1939 at all, and I don’t think it will play out the same either. If, for example, the U.S. does go ahead with or without Israel to attack Iran, what I would expect is a massive outpouring all over the world of opposition to that, just as there was sooner or later great opposition to the U.S. attack on Iraq, and that will provide some constraint on what the U.S. does and some encouragement for it to back away. Again, I think that these little kind of palace wars that are dreamed up by neocon schemers for the most part, who have inside connections, are quite different from the world wars in so many ways that it’s hard to draw a parallel.

Horton: So you think that if it really did come to, I don’t know, record unemployment and a horrible 1930-style situation, that at that point that’s where they’ll have to realize and give the empire up rather than going crazy like FDR and expanding it.

Higgs: Not give it, but cut back on it I think.

Horton: Yeah. At least. Well, hopefully starting with Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iraq and Somalia, for their sakes. Thanks so much for your time, Bob, and your wisdom. Appreciate it.

Higgs: You’re welcome, Scott.

Horton: Everybody, that’s the great Bob Higgs, author of Crisis and Leviathan and Depression, War, and Cold War, Independent.org.

org.

Alan Grayson

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_06_04_grayson.mp3]

Florida Congressman Alan Grayson discusses his “War Is Making You Poor” bill that seeks to limit war spending and cut income taxes, how ending war spending on Afghanistan would free up enough money to eliminate federal taxes on income under 35k/year, why Israel’s blockade of Gaza is simply to keep Hamas from obtaining weapons.

MP3 here. (23:29)

Congressman Alan Grayson was born and grew up in the Bronx neighborhood of New York City. He graduated with high honors from Harvard College, worked as an economist, then returned to Harvard. In four years, Alan earned a J.D. with honors from Harvard Law School, a master’s degree from the Harvard School of Government, and finished all of the course work and passed the general exams for a Ph.D. in Government. His master’s thesis focuses on gerontology. He went on to be a founding member of the Alliance for Aging Research.

In the early 1990s Alan took leave from the practice of law and started a business. He was the first President of IDT Corp., a telecom/internet company, which is now a Fortune 1000 company, traded on the New York Stock Exchange.

Congressman Grayson was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2008, serving Florida’s 8th district.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_06_01_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, coauthor of We Who Dared to Say No to War: American Antiwar Writing from 1812 to Now, discusses Daniel Webster’s stirring speech against the War of 1812, the slaughter of retreating Iraqi soldiers in the 1991 Gulf War and how the institution of war has become the US civic religion.

MP3 here. (17:38)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of nine books. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_05_12_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses the pitfalls his “Audit the Fed” amendment faces during the legislative process, vastly increased public awareness of the Federal Reserve and central banking, gold’s increase in value relative the dollar and why the US empire would be impossible to maintain without the Fed’s ability to monetize debt.

MP3 here. (10:28)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and Freedom Under Siege. His archived columns for Antiwar.com appear at http://original.antiwar.com/paul

Mark Ames

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_04_29_ames.mp3]

Mark Ames, co-editor and writer for The eXiled, discusses the money-making business of war (for the politically connected few), why halfhearted government deregulation of the thoroughly rigged banking system does not create a free market, Alan Greenspan’s lucrative consulting business with the Paulson & Co. hedge fund and how the post-Cold War “peace dividend” was scuttled by the neocon-inspired “unipolar moment.”

MP3 here. (29:27)

Mark Ames is the founding editor of The eXile and co-editor of The eXiled. His articles have appeared in The Nation, Playboy, Daily Beast, Alternet, Radar, The New York Press, and elsewhere. He is the author of Going Postal: Rage, Murder and Rebellion from Reagan’s Workplaces to Clinton’s Columbine and Beyond which became the basis for the critically-acclaimed 90-minute BBC documentary film Going Postal.

Ames is co-author with Matt Taibbi of the book The eXile: Sex, Drugs and Libel in the New Russia. Ames has made guest appearances on MSNBC’s The Dylan Ratigan Show, Dylan Ratigan’s ABC radio program, Chuck Mertz’s “This Is Hell” show, Scott Horton’s Antiwar Radio show, Michelangelo Signorile’s radio show, KFPK radio, Air America and elsewhere. He is currently at work on a new book for Wiley.

Lew Rockwell

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_04_16_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses Ron Paul’s ability to explain and popularize libertarian ideas, the large number of Americans seething about the economy, how William F. Buckley, Jr. spearheaded the purging of antiwar rightists from the Conservative movement (and how Ron Paul is putting them back in) and how the hidden inflation tax allows the government to fund wars and avoid popular outrage.

MP3 here. (27:50)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and Chairman of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his podcast show here.

Jon Basil Utley

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_03_19_utley.mp3]

Jon Basil Utley, director of Americans Against World Empire, discusses the insular and ignorant world views of pro-Israel evangelical Americans, how the strong outward appearance of the US empire belies the rotten core, gerrymandering’s deleterious effects on representative government and how rising interest rates threaten the US government’s ability to finance debt.

MP3 here. (44:46)

Jon Basil Utley is associate publisher of The American Conservative. He was a foreign correspondent in South America for the Journal of Commerce and Knight Ridder newspapers and former associate editor of The Times of the Americas. He is a writer and adviser for Antiwar.com and edits a blog, The Military Industrial Congressional Complex.

John V. Walsh

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_03_18_walsh.mp3]

John V. Walsh, frequent contributor to Counterpunch.org, discusses Paul Krugman’s “economic chauvinism” regarding China’s currency valuation, provocative US military postures in Central and East Asia, China’s eons-long history of open trade and self defense and why the US should abandon the policy of “containing” China.

MP3 here. (30:36)

John V. Walsh is a scientist who lives in Cambridge, Mass. He is a frequent contributor to CounterPunch.org and Antiwar.com.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_03_04_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses the budgetary limitations that expansive U.S. foreign policy imposes on domestic programs, the Dennis Kucunich resolution (co-sponsored by Rep. Paul) that will require a House of Representatives debate on the war in Afghanistan, wrongheaded government action on the coming dollar crisis and why the peace and liberty movement is best served by setting a good example and avoiding the politics of personality.

MP3 here. (13:34)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and Freedom Under Siege. His archived columns for Antiwar.com appear at http://original.antiwar.com/paul

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_02_11_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, former co-contributor to Antiwar Radio and author of The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses the FED’s attempt to prevent inflation after creating trillions in new money, our dim future of resource scarcity and martial law, the hyperinflation tipping-point ratio of deficit to national budget reached by the US, the looming reality of US sovereign debt default and the delusion of US fiscal solvency that exists only in the minds of Americans.

MP3 here. (34:06)

Charles Goyette is an award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

James Bovard

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_22_bovard.mp3]

James Bovard, author of Attention Deficit Democracy, discusses the two-party conspiracy against justice since the Independent Counsel‘s expiration in 1999, the thousands of illegal FBI wiretaps excused as mere “technical violations” by apologists, the dumbing down of the Bill of Rights and the barriers to enforcing a police state in the US.

MP3 here. (37:30)

James Bovard is a contributor to The American Conservative magazine and policy advisor at The Future of Freedom Foundation. He is the author of Attention Deficit Democracy, The Bush Betrayal and many other books.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/10_01_21_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses his disinterest in political parties, the slippery slope from indefinitely detaining foreign terrorism suspects to designating domestic criminals “enemy combatants,” why the US empire is more likely to end from the dollar’s collapse than a reasoned decision to return to a republic, the diminishing returns from intelligence spending and why reestablishing gold and silver as currency is a good idea.

MP3 here. (29:49)

Part 2, Part 3

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and Freedom Under Siege. His archived columns for Antiwar.com appear at http://original.antiwar.com/paul

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_12_08_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, our long-lost former co-contributor to Antiwar Radio and author of The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses how the Iraq war went from “paying for itself” to costing trillions, the individuals responsible for the US financial crisis, the widespread use of accounting tricks and phony balance sheets to delay bankruptcy, the declining worth of all the world’s paper currencies, India’s landmark gold purchase, how the FED’s low interest rate policy discourages much-need saving and how alternative currencies could keep markets functioning should the US dollar collapse.

MP3 here. (1:12:38)

Charles Goyette is an award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Charles Goyette

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_10_28_goyette.mp3]

Charles Goyette, our long-lost former co-contributor to Antiwar Radio and author of The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments, discusses the enormous costs of maintaining a world empire – especially these last few wars, how the general public is mesmerized by CNBC and ignorant of economics, why keeping government out of the money creation business is essential to maintain liberty, the U.S. dollar’s weakening role as reserve currency despite decades of post-Bretton Woods hegemony, China’s attempt to limit exposure to U.S. government debt while stockpiling commodities and the danger that the endgame of the current U.S. monetary system could be a command economy.

MP3 here. (79:12)

Charles Goyette is an award winning morning drive-time radio host from Phoenix, AZ. He is a libertarian commentator, who is noted for his outspoken anti-war views, his opposition to the war in Iraq, and his economic commentary. He is the author of the book The Dollar Meltdown: Surviving the Impending Currency Crisis with Gold, Oil, and Other Unconventional Investments.

Donald Losman

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_10_21_losman.mp3]

Donald Losman, professor of economics at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, discusses the secondary role OPEC played in 1970s U.S. economic problems, U.S. government intervention in oil prices that encouraged poor consumer choices in the broader economy, the numerous real costs not included in a barrel of oil and why military coercion is not needed to spur international trade.

MP3 here. (28:13)

Donald Losman is a professor of economics at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National Defense University, Washington, D.C. He is the author of a 2001 policy analysis for the CATO Institute, “Economic Security: A National Security Folly?

Losman began teaching at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces (ICAF) in 1982 and also holds a diploma from ICAF. He has worked in senior professional military education since 1978, having taught at the U.S. Army War College and the National War College as well. Earlier, he was a civilian academic for 14 years. Dr. Losman holds a PhD in international economics from the University of Florida, with a minor in international politics. He has also served as a consultant to the Small Business Administration and the World Bank; he has worked in the Pentagon and for an economic consulting corporation. Dr. Losman is the author of four books, over 60 scholarly articles, and op-ed pieces in all our nation’s leading newspapers as well as in overseas publications. He has regional expertise in the Middle East and is recognized as an authority on economic sanctions. He also has expertise in defense industrial base issues and the electronics industries.

The views expressed are the author’s and do not represent the views of the National  Defense University or the Department of Defense.

Rep. Ron Paul

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_09_23_paul.mp3]

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses the overwhelming popular support for auditing the FED, the surreptitious method of funding wars through inflation instead of direct taxation, the case for withdrawing from Afghanistan and Ben Bernanke’s refusal to change course and acknowledge flaws in his economic theory.

MP3 here. (14:42)

Congressman Ron Paul represents Texas’s 14th district. He is the author of End the Fed, The Revolution: A Manifesto, A Foreign Policy of Freedom: Peace, Commerce, and Honest Friendship and Freedom Under Siege.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_08_18_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse, discusses the debt some progressive causes owe to states’ rights, vintage 1812 war propaganda that sounds alarmingly like the run-up to the war in Iraq, state nullification of unconstitutional federal laws and the undue respect given to the Supremacy Clause.

MP3 here. (36:05)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of nine books. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Thomas E. Woods

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/09_06_26_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, author of Meltdown: A Free-Market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and Government Bailouts Will Make Things Worse, discusses Seymour Melman‘s [.pdf] research into the societal repercussions of a military economy, the diversion of research scientists from the private sector to Cold War military programs, the transformation of the U.S. university system into a DOD jobs program and the corruption of defense contractors into companies that can’t compete in a free market.

MP3 here. (22:11)

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., is the New York Times bestselling author of nine books. A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Harvard and his master’s, M.Phil., and Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Frida Berrigan

War is Bad for the Economy

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/09_03_13_fberrigan.mp3]

Frida Berrigan, columnist for Foreign Policy in Focus, discusses the frantic U.S. defense contractors lobbying for stimulus money while promising job creation, the prospect of a militarized outer space, Lockheed Martin’s overpriced and unnecessary F-22 Raptor and why the commonly held assumption that World War II ended the Great Depression must be challenged.

MP3 here. (23:33)

Frida Berrigan is Senior Program Associate for the Arms and Security Initiative at the New America Foundation. She is a columnist for Foreign Policy in Focus and a contributing editor of In These Times magazine.

David R. Henderson

The Economics of Empire

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/09_02_26_henderson.mp3]

David R. Henderson, research fellow with the Hoover Institution, discusses the love-fest between Congressional Democrats and President Obama, the benefit of empire for a select few and the net loss for everyone else, the common misconceptions on what caused and worsened the 1973 oil crisis and the difficulty of communicating with people whose ideas and arguments are wrapped in insulating layers of emotion and patriotism.

MP3 here. (37:08)

David R. Henderson is a research fellow with the Hoover Institution and an associate professor of economics in the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy at the Naval Postgraduate School. He writes a regular column, “The Wartime Economist”, for Antiwar.com and is the author of The Joy of Freedom: An Economist’s Odyssey. His latest book is The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics.

Robert Higgs

Depression and War, Then and Now

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/09_02_20_23_higgs.mp3]

Robert Higgs, senior fellow at the Independent Institute and author of Depression, War and Cold War, discusses his thesis of “regime uncertainty” as a major factor of the Great Depression, the crash and recovery of 1921-22, the bubble created by the Fed in the later “roaring” twenties in order to prop up British interests, how World War II provided the certainty big business needed to start investing again – in arms, why the Cold War buildup was still cheap enough for the economy to continue under its weight, who really benefits from empire, who pays, the irrelevance of trade deficits, the roots of the financial crisis in Wall St.’s bogus financial models, congressional and Federal Reserve polices and the cartelized ratings business, the all-important intertwined policy of inflation and war, his view of the extent of the collapse and whether the empire will be dismantled, the danger of high price inflation, danger of nationalization, and why government regulation of the market is responsible for – not the solution to – its failures.

MP3 here. (1:16:17)

Robert Higgs is Senior Fellow in Political Economy for The Independent Institute and Editor of the Institute’s quarterly journal The Independent Review. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, and he has taught at the University of Washington, Lafayette College, Seattle University, and the University of Economics, Prague. He has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University and Stanford University, and a fellow for the Hoover Institution and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Higgs is the editor of The Independent Institute books Opposing the Crusader State, The Challenge of Liberty, Re-Thinking Green, Hazardous to Our Health? and Arms, Politics, and the Economy, plus the volume Emergence of the Modern Political Economy.

His authored books include Neither Liberty Nor Safety, Depression, War, and Cold War, Politická ekonomie strachu (The Political Economy of Fear, in Czech), Resurgence of the Warfare State, Against Leviathan, The Transformation of the American Economy 1865-1914, Competition and Coercion, and Crisis and Leviathan. A contributor to numerous scholarly volumes, he is the author of more than 100 articles and reviews in academic journals.

Alan Bock

Eye on the Empire

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/09_02_04_bock.mp3]

Alan Bock, senior editorial writer at the Orange Country Register, discusses how Alan Greenspan’s easy-money policy created a war bubble concurrent with the housing/consumer spending bubble, the unfortunate historical victory of Hamiltonian central banking over the Jeffersonian decentralized model, Afghanistan’s well-earned reputation as the graveyard of empires and the merits of a South Africa style truth and reconciliation commission for the Bush administration.

MP3 here. (52:21)

Alan Bock has a regular column, “Eye on the Empire”, on Antiwar.com. He is the senior editorial writer at the Orange County Register and author of Ambush at Ruby Ridge and Waiting to Inhale: the Politics of Medical Marijuana. His website and blog are at alanbock.com.

Justin Raimondo

Putin’s Warning to America

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/09_02_02_raimondo.mp3]

Justin Raimondo, editorial director for Antiwar.com, discusses Vladimir Putin’s red-baiting of Soviet America, the U.S. military’s use of old Soviet supply lines into Afghanistan, how the incredible U.S./Russia role reversal confirms the existence of Bizarro World, why the crumbling U.S. economy won’t stop an Afghanistan surge or prevent new interventions in Africa and how the use of logical deduction in figuring out U.S. foreign policy goals only leads to wild speculation.

MP3 here. (37:24)

Justin Raimondo is the author of Reclaiming the American Right: The Lost Legacy of the Conservative Movement and editorial director for Antiwar.com. His articles are archived at Antiwar.com/justin.

Thomas Woods

World War II Was Bad for the Economy

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/08_12_18_woods.mp3]

Thomas E. Woods, senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses the evidence that contradicts Paul Krugman’s opinion that war is good for the economy, the renewed skepticism on the cause-and-effect relationship between WWII production and U.S. economic recovery, the stifling of private investment during the Depression due to erratic governmental interventions, the centrality of managerial intransigence to current Big-3 automaker woes and the debate on the benefits of a global division of labor.

MP3 here. (38:15)

Thomas E. Woods. is a senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, co-editor with Murray Polner of We Who Dared to Say No to War: American Antiwar Writing from 1812 to Now, and author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History and Meltdown: A Free-market Look at Why the Stock Market Collapsed, the Economy Tanked, and the Government Bailout Will Make Things Worse.

Joseph Salerno

The Logic of War-Making

[audio:http://awr.dissentradio.com/08_12_09_salerno.mp3]

Joseph Salerno, senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses the praxeology of war-making, the difference between entrepreneurs and plutocrats, the unfortunate state of affairs that compels major U.S. businesses to employ Washington lobbyists, the geopolitics of Middle East oil and why foreign policy is war by another name.

MP3 here. (26:19)

Joseph Salerno is a senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, professor of economics at Pace University, and editor of the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics.

Chris Hedges

Confronting the Terrorist Within

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_12_02_hedges.mp3]

Chris Hedges, author of War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning, discusses the anti-occupation motives of terrorists, the similarities of extremists that transcend religion and culture, how a U.S. economic collapse could usher in a popular uprising of the Christian Right, the desperate and mostly ignored situation in the Gaza Strip and the terrible consequences of a war with Iran.

MP3 here. (36:03)

Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter, senior fellow at The Nation Institute, lecturer at Princeton University and the author of War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning and American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War On America.

Ron Paul

Against Empire

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_11_21_paul.mp3]

Representative Ron Paul (R-TX) discusses the expansion of the American empire after the collapse of the Soviet Union, how empires lead to the loss of liberty, security and wealth, and long term prospects of the current financial downturn.

MP3 here. (23:43)

Representative Ron Paul (R-TX) is a former Republican presidential candidate. He is the author of The Revolution: A Manifesto, Pillars of Prosperity and Freedom Under Siege.

Robert Prechter

Predicting Wars With Charts

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_11_18_prechter.mp3]

Robert R. Prechter, Jr., Executive Director of the Socionomics Institute, discusses how Elliott Wave market trend analysis is predictive not only of stock markets but also human social behavior, the societal mood as a leading indicator of economic trends and warfare, the correlation between bull markets and bright mini skirts and how the bailouts encourage recklessness on Wall St. by encouraging moral hazard.

MP3 here. (34:08)

Robert R. Prechter, Jr. is president of Elliott Wave International, which publishes analysis of global stock, bond, currency, metals and energy markets. He is also Executive Director of the Socionomics Institute. Mr. Prechter is author, co-author and/or editor of 13 books, including Elliott Wave Principle – Key to Market Behavior , Socionomics: The Science of History and Social Prediction, and Conquer the Crash.

Mark Ames

US vs. Russia, Reason

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_28_ames.mp3]

Mark Ames, author of “The Cold War that Wasn’t” in The Nation, discusses the dominant narrative and ideological underpinnings in the U.S. press regarding the recent Georgian attack on South Ossetia and subsequent Russian counterattack on Georgia, the attempt to portray Russia as the aggressor by floating the idea of a first-strike cyber war despite the lack of any evidence, the alleged poisoning of Ukraine’s Victor Yushchenko and the current dispute between Yushchenko and Yulia Timoshenko over her reaction to the Georgia war, the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko, NATO expansion into Eastern Europe, the precedent set by U.S. intervention in Kosovo, the danger of putting “defensive” missiles in Eastern Europe while the U.S. foreign policy establishment contemplates first strike capability, U.S. NED support for the Russian National Bolsheviks, the “shock therapy” robbery of Russian resources under Yeltsin’s autocracy in the 1990s and the consequences.

MP3 here. (64:25)

Mark Ames is a journalist who has written for several publications including the New York Press, The Nation and GQ Russia and is the founding editor and regular contributor of the Moscow-based newspaper The eXile. He is the author of Going Postal: Rage, Murder and Rebellion From Reagan’s Workplaces to Clinton’s Columbine and Beyond and The eXile: Sex, Drugs and Libel in the New Russia.

Steve Clemons

Iran, Palestine, Pakistan

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_09_clemons.mp3]

Steve Clemons, director of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation and author of the blog TheWashingtonNote, discusses Joe Biden’s threat to remove Bush and Cheney from power if they bombed Iran in early 2007, the Annapolis peace negotiations between Israel and Palestine, the challenges of a stable settlement, the influence of the evangelical Christian wing of the Israel lobby, the police state in Palestine and the fragile and dangerous situation in Pakistan.

MP3 here. (43:19)

Steven Clemons directs the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, which aims to promote a new American internationalism that combines a tough-minded realism about America’s interests in the world with a pragmatic idealism about the kind of world order best suited to America’s democratic way of life. He is also a Senior Fellow at New America, and previously served as Executive Vice President.

Publisher of the popular political blog The Washington Note, Mr. Clemons is a long-term policy practitioner and entrepreneur in Washington, D.C. He has served as Executive Vice President of the Economic Strategy Institute, Senior Policy Advisor on Economic and International Affairs to Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) and was the first Executive Director of the Nixon Center.

Declan McCullagh

Bailout Law’s Police State Powers

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_09_mccullagh.mp3]

Declan McCullagh, chief political correspondent for CNET, discusses the current financial crisis, the cost of the bailouts to Americans, newly permanent IRS undercover operations powers, the many data bases tracking us, the last minute additional terms to the final bailout package and the broad power given to the Treasury Secretary.

MP3 here. (33:54)

Declan McCullagh is an award-winning journalist for CNET’s News.com who often writes about computer security and privacy issues while serving as CNET’s chief political correspondent.

Richard Maybury

End of the Empire?

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_08_maybury.mp3]

Richard Maybury, author of the U.S. and World Early Warning Report, discusses the evolution of common law, the American Revolutionary revolt for natural rights, the “divine right” of the majority, the importance of self-defense to a society’s freedom, the imbalanced offensive/defensive cost ratio, Osama Bin Laden’s strategy of bankrupting the American empire, how to profit from a libertarian understanding of money and power, the emerging second Cold War with Russia, the moral questions around investing in government-tied businesses, the corruption of political power, the two-party system hoax and the coming second American Revolution.

MP3 here. (44:25)

Richard Maybury is the author of the investment newsletter, U.S. and World Early Warning Report and the Uncle Eric books.

Jon Basil Utley

Costs of Soldiers in Iraq

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_10_06_utley.mp3]

Jon Basil Utley, director of Americans Against World Empire, discusses the true costs of the war and staggering defense budget, the many hidden earmarks Congress rewards itself, the role of the empire in the financial meltdown, the many new enemies being created around the world, Americans’ love of war and the end of the empire.

MP3 here. (41:31)

Jon Basil Utley is associate publisher of The American Conservative and Robert A. Taft Fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute. A former correspondent for Knight Ridder in South America, Utley has written for the Harvard Business Review on foreign nationalism and was for 17 years a commentator on the Voice of America. He is director of Americans Against World Empire.

Lew Rockwell

Banking, Bailouts and War in US History

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_09_25_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, president of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses Thomas Jefferson’s theory of inflationary money and the business cycle, the history of fiat money in America and around the world from Marco Polo’s adventures through Massachusetts Bay Colony, the Revolutionary War, 1812-14, Andrew Jackson’s battle with Biddle, Lincoln’s greenbacks, the Gilded Age, progressive era tyranny of Woodrow Wilson, passage of the Federal Reserve Act, the World Wars, Great Depression, Cold War, Terror War, the multi-trillion dollar bailout, end of the empire, and the heroic Ron Paul.

MP3 here. (57:33)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and President of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his new podcast show here.

Lew Rockwell

Smash the Warfare State!

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_08_26_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell, founder and President of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, discusses his new podcast interview program, Joe Biden’s long term and central role in promoting the warfare state, demagoguery and omission at the Democratic convention, the reality of America’s empire and the elective emperor who rules it, the important new book We Who Dared to Say No to War: American Antiwar Writing from 1812 to Now, why murder is still murder even if a government employee does it, the big lie of government provided safety and myth of a peace loving American population, why its fun to oppose evil, the growing militarism of the domestic police state, the terrible danger in “privatizing” the state’s police powers such as tax collections and prisons, the possibility that the Georgian crisis was deliberately precipitated in order to boost the Republicans’ fortunes in the November election, the bogus nature of the first Cold War and now the second, the sanity of the old imperial establishment only as compared to the new, Democracy as subservience to the U.S. government, how the state can always use its own failures as the excuse to increase its power as it is doing now in the financial markets and the need for a realignment toward peace and freedom.

MP3 here. (52:18)

Lew Rockwell is the founder and President of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982. Check out his new podcast show here.

Robert Higgs

Philip Dru in Power

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_08_20_higgs.mp3]

Robert Higgs, senior fellow at the Independent Institute and author of Crisis and Leviathan: Critical Episodes in the Growth of American Government, discusses the legacy of Woodrow Wilson’s Cheney, Edward Mandell House, House’s rise to power and links to big money men, Philip Dru Administrator: A Story of Tomorrow – the blueprint for a fascist America written by House in 1910-11, how House took advantage of Wilson’s narcissism to get America into World War I, the consequences of American intervention in that war, the concept of the “ratchet effect” of government expansion explained in Crisis and Leviathan, why most perceived governmental “failures” are really successes if you understand the intentions, the true character and beneficiaries of the American empire, the economics of the world’s oil market and the buried truth that all of state power is rooted in fear.

MP3 here. (54:05)

Robert Higgs is Senior Fellow in Political Economy for The Independent Institute and Editor of the Institute’s quarterly journal The Independent Review. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, and he has taught at the University of Washington, Lafayette College, Seattle University, and the University of Economics, Prague. He has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University and Stanford University, and a fellow for the Hoover Institution and the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Higgs is the editor of The Independent Institute books Opposing the Crusader State, The Challenge of Liberty, Re-Thinking Green, Hazardous to Our Health? and Arms, Politics, and the Economy, plus the volume Emergence of the Modern Political Economy.

His authored books include Neither Liberty Nor Safety, Depression, War, and Cold War, Politická ekonomie strachu (The Political Economy of Fear, in Czech), Resurgence of the Warfare State, Against Leviathan, The Transformation of the American Economy 1865-1914, Competition and Coercion, and Crisis and Leviathan. A contributor to numerous scholarly volumes, he is the author of more than 100 articles and reviews in academic journals.

Lew Rockwell

The Central Bank and Its Corpses

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_06_12_rockwell.mp3]

Lew Rockwell discusses his recent talk at the Future of Freedom Foundation conference about modern wars’ dependence on inflation by the Federal Reserve, how the Fed fueled WWI to help the Morgan empire, why governments prefer to debase a currency rather than tax or borrow, how the Fed not only inflates the currency but redistributes wealth from the poor to the politically-connected rich, creates the booms and busts of the business cycle, and makes the warfare state possible, the government’s corruption of language to hide it’s crimes, importance of Austrian economic thought and how all acts committed by the state would be crimes if carried out by regular citizens.

MP3 here. (44:04)

YouTube here.

Lew Rockwell is the founder and President of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, Vice President of the Center for Libertarian Studies in Burlingame, California, and publisher of the political Web site LewRockwell.com. He served as Ron Paul’s congressional chief of staff between 1978 and 1982.

Greg Grandin

The Good Neighbor

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_06_12_grandin.mp3]

Greg Grandin discusses his recent article “Losing Latin America, What Will The Obama Doctrine Be Like?” about U.S. intervention in Latin America dating back to the Monroe Doctrine, the lessons learned by the War Party from Iran-Contra, how American domination under the guise of “free-trade” has turned many against capitalism, and the status of Chavez in Latin America.

MP3 here. (34:42)

Greg Grandin teaches history at New York University. He is the author of Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, the United States, and the Rise of the New Imperialism and The Last Colonial Massacre: Latin America in the Cold War.

Rep. Ron Paul

Peace and Liberty

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/charles/awrpaul052808.mp3]

Ron Paul, Republican congressman from Texas and current presidential candidate, discusses his new book, The Revolution: A Manifesto, the issues discussed in his book, the revelations of former press secretary Scott McClellan regarding the Bush administration’s propaganda campaign in the run-up to war, the Asia Times article on the proposed attack of Iran by the Bush administration by August, the status of his presidential campaign, the enthusiasm of his supporters, the reach of the campaign and the message, the status of the GOP delegates won by Ron Paul during the campaign, the rumor that Ron Paul is negotiating to speak at the Republican National Convention, the rally planned, Bob Barr’s nomination as the Libertarian presidential nominee, the status of the Iraq War and whether or not Congress will stop it, the status and the future of the U.S. dollar, the possible consequences of attacking Iran on the oil market and the U.S. dollar and the need for dissolution of the Federal Reserve.

MP3 here. (20:23)

YouTube here.

Ron Paul is a Republican United States Congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a physician, a bestselling author, and a 2008 U.S. presidential candidate for the Republican presidential nomination. Ron Paul was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in a 1976 special election. He won his first full term to the U.S. House in 1978. In 1988, Ron Paul ran for president of the United States in the Libertarian Party and won the presidential nomination that year. Paul’s new book is The Revolution: A Manifesto.

Christopher Coyne

“Exporting Democracy” Cannot Work

[audio:http://dissentradio.com/radio/08_05_23_coyne.mp3]

Christopher Coyne, author of After War: The Political Economy of Exporting Democracy, discusses the economics of American empire, the true motivations behind the slogan of “spreading democracy,” the domestic problems of intervention including bloated budgets, bureaucracies and lost liberty, how politicians, bureaucrats, and government contractors’ incentives are the opposite of private business – success is punished and failure is rewarded, leading to increased budgets, more employees and more power, the thoroughly bipartisan crony capitalism in Washington DC, the reasons why Germany and Japan were “successful” interventions and the urgent need for renewed skepticism towards the government among the American population.

MP3 here. (32:30)

Christopher Coyne is an assistant professor of economics at West Virginia University. He is also the North American Editor of The Review of Austrian Economics and a Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center. He contributes to the blog, The Austrian Economists. His book, After War: The Political Economy of Exporting Democracy, published by Stanford University Press, is now available.